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    • ICW Alternate Route Anchorages

      ICW Alternate Route Anchorages
      Statute Mile: 686
      Lat/Lon:
      31 01.396 North/081 29.401 West (anchorage on Umbrella Creek, west, northwest of unlighted daybeacon #A4)
      31 01.002 North/081 28.569 West (anchorage on Umbrella creek, east and south of unlighted daybeacon #A2
      30 59.932 North/081 29.421 West (anchorage on Dover Creek, south of unlighted daybeacon #A10)
      Location: Northern entrance to the Alternate ICW/Umbrella Creek route cuts south from the Little Satilla River, at flashing daybeacon #1A; Southern entrnace to the Alternate ICW/Umbrella Creek route strikes west, northwest at the ICW’s flashing daybeacon #40
      Minimum Depth: 4 ½ feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 36 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Fair to Poor

      Rating:

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    • Floyd Creek Anchorage

      Floyd Creek Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 695.5
      Lat/Lon: 30 55.464 North/081 28.195 West
      Location: just inside the southeasterly mouth of Floyd Creek, west, northwest of the ICW’s unlighted daybeacon #40
      Minimum Depth: 11 feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 38 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Good, but open to strong southeastern and northwestern winds

      Rating:

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    • Waterway Anchorage

      Waterway Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 693
      Lat/Lon: near 30 56.424 North/081 25.960 West
      Location: on the charted patch of deep water north and east of flashing daybeacon #37
      Minimum Depth: 7-feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 50 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Poor; fair weather anchorage ONLY

      Rating:

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      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Claiborne -  July 22, 2009 - 11:57 am

        Subject: Cumberland Island anchorage ICS SM 694
        Cruising News: Anchored on 8/17/08 in the waterway anchorage adjacent to Cumberland Island at FL G 37. Had a difficult time setting our hook (35 # delta) in 10 feet of water with 7:1 scope. Bottom very hard. Grounded briefly the next morning at low tide. Chart soundings are very liberal! We bounced like a cork with moderate west winds. I\’d suggest bypassing this anchorage for one of several within 5 miles further south.
        Chuck Taylor
        aboard S/V Music

        Reply to Claiborne
    • Brickhill River Northern Anchorage

      Brickhill River Northern Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 696 (northern entrance from the ICW)
      Lat/Lon: 30 53.191 North/081 27.726 West
      Location: Brickhill River runs southeast between the Waterway’s unlighted daybeacon #40 and flashing daybeacon #41
      Minimum Depth: sufficient room for vessels as large as 36 feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels up to 50 feet on anchorage between the creek’s southeasterly mouth, and the charted split moving upstream, and up to 42 feet on southwestern fork anchorage
      Foul Weather Shelter: Good, except open to western, and southwestern winds

      Rating:

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      Comments from Cruisers (7)

      1. John Winter -  July 15, 2013 - 10:56 am

        We just came thru here and took the Brickhill all the way thru after docking at the Plum Orchard pier for a couple of hours, and agree with this posting. Go slow and your depth finder will tell you which way to go. The Brickhill was easy all the way using normal navigation techniques (chart watching and outside of curves)
        John Winter

        Reply to John
      2. Sonny Reeves -  May 29, 2013 - 2:55 pm

        Anchored in the Brickhill river around the bend from the primitive campsites. No cell service, no internet. Lots of green flies. Ran off the solar panels and inverter with no problems. Towed the dink. Caught bait and fished but only caught small sharks, Walked to beach saw alligators and an armadillo. Very nice would like to spend a few weeks at the different anchorages in cooler weather. Had a strong south breeze all week. Saw more horses than people.
        Sonny Reeves

        Reply to Sonny
      3. s/v Skye -  April 23, 2013 - 3:52 pm

        Anchored the night of 4/14/13 in northern end, entering between #40 and #41. Two boats anchored about a mile upstream near the wreckage noted. Very stormy night with winds of 30-40 kns. Both kept swinging 180 degrees for about 2 hours. Disconcerting but both held with no problems. Have previously anchored around the big bend in 15′ and had good night in fair weather. Will use this river again.
        s/v Skye

        Reply to s/v
      4. John Winter -  April 23, 2013 - 10:28 am

        We did the entire river and depths are still as reported, including entering the river. However, one must use common sense as they cruise the river as there are shallow spots in obvious places (stay on outside of turns, etc). Beautiful run and anchorages.
        John Winter

        Reply to John
      5. Sonny -  January 10, 2012 - 6:57 am

        Anchored in Mumford Creek (10ft at low tide, lots of room.), off Brickhill river. Very quiet. Entered Brickhill at Dividings with shallow water. Jan 7, 2012.
        Sonny

        Reply to Sonny
      6. Jean Thomason -  October 9, 2009 - 10:24 am

        The Park Service runs a tour to Plum Orchard by ferry on the 2nd and 4th Sundays, I believe in the afternoon. If you get there some other way, you can still go through the house. The latest news is that the Park Service has a plan to run a north island tour using ground transportation. There will probably be an extra charge for the tour. They plan to take 15 people daily to visit Plum Orchard, Stafford, the chimneys and the Settlement (the first African Baptist Church and a settlement home which will be a museum/ restrooms). The planning has been done; now they are waiting on the vehicles. They spent $6 million renovating and preserving Plum Orchard last year.
        Jean Thomason (DOVEKIE)

        Reply to Jean
      7. Randy Tyson -  October 2, 2009 - 2:41 pm

        Subject: Brickhill River, GA
        Cruising News: There are several anchorages in the Brickhill River that are very well protected and have fair to good holding. Our favorite is off Plum Orchard. The river is wide enough for a 45-50 footer to swing although if you get too close to the marsh side the falling tide can ground you in the mud. Since the current can be fairly swift best to make sure to back down and set your anchor well. You can leave your dink at the floating dock while you go ashore, just don’t block the South end where the rangers, ferry etc dock. We’ve been told the house is open on the 2nd and 4th weekend of each month, but I can’t confirm that. There is MUCH less pedestrian traffic here compared to the Sea Camp dock at the Southern end of the island and usually you’ll have it to yourself. The hike across to the beach is about 2 miles and at places the trail in covered in fallen trees, but you will probally find the beach deserted.
        Randy Tyson
        Second Star

        Reply to Randy
    • Shellbine Creek Anchorages

      Shellbine Creek Anchorages
      Statute Mile: 698
      Lat/Lon:
      30 54.673 North/081 29.550 West (anchorage between the creek’s southeasterly mouth, and the charted split moving upstream)
      30 54.679 North/081 29.830 West (anchorage on southwestern fork of Shellbine Creek)
      Location: Shellbine Creek cuts into the Waterway’s mainland (northwesterly) shoreline north of flashing daybeacon #43
      Minimum Depth: 7-feet, but a GPS chartplotter would be ever so useful in bypassing a large, unmarked shoal flanking the entrance’s western entrance point
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels up to 50 feet on anchorage between the creek’s southeasterly mouth, and the charted split moving upstream, and up to 42 feet on southwestern fork anchorage
      Foul Weather Shelter: Fair on anchorage between the creek’s southeasterly mouth, and the charted split moving upstream, and Very Good on southwestern fork anchorage

      Rating:

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    • Delaroche Creek Anchorage

      Delaroche Creek Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 702
      Lat/Lon: near 30 51.588 North/081 30.208 West
      Location: northwest of the Waterway’s flashing daybeacon #58), just east of the charted split in Delaroche Creek
      Minimum Depth: 11-feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 38 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Good

      Rating:

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      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Jean Thomason (DOVEKIE) -  April 7, 2010 - 10:17 pm

        Anchored here 4-7-10 with SE wind so went a little farther than indicated on chart above. By dropping the hook just beyond the split we had plenty of room to be blown to the north west and shallower depths. Dropped the hook at N30 51.653, W081 30.308 in 12.5 ft at high tide but boat was in 15.5 ft. Easy to get in and close to the waterway.

        Reply to Jean
    • Brickhill River Southern Anchorage


      Brickhill River Southern Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 704
      Lat/Lon: 30 51.576 North/081 28.051 West
      Location: southern mouth of Brickhill River cuts into the eastern flank of the AICW south of marker #60
      Depth: 9+ feet (Be SURE to read “Navigational Detail” below to maintain these depths)
      Navigation Detail: Click Here For Navigational Detail of this Anchorage
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 45 feet
      Holding Ground Evaluation: excellent
      Foul Weather Shelter: excellent, only unusually strong northwesterly winds might be a problem
      Dinghy Dock Access: small US Park Service dock and beach near Plum Orchard Plantation can serve as a dinghy landing
      Pet Friendly: pets can be taken ashore at dinghy dock or small beach near Plum Orchard Plantation

      Rating:

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      Comments from Cruisers (6)

      1. John Winter -  July 15, 2013 - 11:36 am

        We just came thru here and took the Brickhill all the way thru after docking at the Plum Orchard pier for a couple of hours, and agree with this posting. Go slow and your depth finder will tell you which way to go. The Brickhill was easy all the way using normal navigation techniques (chart watching and outside of curves)
        John Winter

        Reply to John
      2. Greg and Donna -  April 25, 2013 - 9:11 am

        Stayed here 4 17 13 easy in and out. Goood depths, not much wind protection , Good holding.
        Greg and Donna
        on Lady in Red.

        Reply to Greg
      3. Rod Busbee -  April 24, 2013 - 8:09 am

        We recently very much enjoyed a night at the south end of the Brickhill River and did visit Plum Orchard. We entered the river from the south and after passing the shoaling to the west at the opening found 20+ feet around the bend to the protected water. Beyond the bend it shallows to about 10 – 12 feet at low tide. This is a most enjoyable anchorage protected from the wind, gentle tidal flows, beautiful scenery and dingy access to the island. While at the dock, you need to be mindful that ferry’s and supply boats do tie up here and make sure you are not in their way. There is a $4/person “on your honor” box at the dock along with envelopes and a pen.
        To summarize, it is one of the best anchorages on our recent trip from N. Myrtle Beach to Fernandina. The persistent winds had made other anchorages less comfortable. Our pet on board insists on trips to shore and the protection along with the accessibility made this one stand out.
        Rod Busbee

        Reply to Rod
      4. John Winter -  April 23, 2013 - 10:29 am

        Still a great stop and still has courtesy car. Price could be cheaper, but given they have a pool, car, etc, then the price is ok. Restaurant is still there and good. Water depths thru Jekyll Creek still shallow, but we see 5′ draft boats going thru threre at dead low tide. We did it at dead low tide in our 4′ draft and were nervous, but did fine (saw nothing less than 5′)
        John Winter

        Reply to John
      5. Pat Kenefick -  April 23, 2013 - 9:23 am

        It has been 2 yrs. ago, but I did enter at this marker unfortunately. When entering in center the water depth was good; stayed in center and water dropped out to 5 ft. and less and yes I went aground; All charts indicated 14 ft. of water at MLLW, but obviously very incorrect; it took Boat U.S. over 2 hrs. to get me off; deeper water was actually almost on Northern shore – 10 ft. Would not go in here again not trusting what is correct with charting etc.
        Pat Kenefick

        Reply to Pat
      6. Captains Mark & Diana Doyle -  August 9, 2012 - 3:38 pm

        Cruisers hear that Brickhill River is “mis-charted” and has a “really shallow entrance” … but, “once inside, has excellent depths.”
        What does that really mean? Do you just “feel your way in” and hope for the best? That might turn out to be a disaster and is almost certainly not worth the stress. So you pass on the anchorage and move on.
        But wait! Brickhill River is a real gem of an anchorage, particularly for active boaters who enjoy hiking in national parks.
        Thus Brickhill River (South) anchorage turns out to be one of the better examples of the value of our new AnchorGuides with their digital breadcrumb tracks.
        Look at the depth-annotated survey track on the page [below]. You can see the entrance surveyed as low as 10 feet (at 7.0 feet above MLLW) along the southern shore. The northern shore had much more water, with depths consistently in the teens. Now the “shallow entrance” anecdotal report can be confirmed and visualized as an extension of shoaling from the southern bank, with a natural channel running along the northern bank.
        And now you can see the true ICW path, EAST of the red navaids, right over the non-existent “mis-charted” shoal and island!
        Once you’re safely in Brickhill River, you’ll enjoy a beautiful anchorage with all-around protection off Cumberland Island National Park. Cumberland Island is one of the largest undeveloped barrier islands along the Atlantic coast, home to a national seashore and one of the largest maritime forests in the U.S.
        You can access the national park at a small park dock or adjacent tiny beach, both for a nominal day-use fee. Nearby shore amenities include picnic tables, trails, and restrooms.
        For a hi-res detailed map of the island, visit http://1.usa.gov/NZMHsW
        Brickhill River (South) anchorage is located just off “Plum Orchard” on the map.
        Best and see you On the Water,
        Captains Mark & Diana Doyle

        Reply to Captains
    • Northern Crooked River Anchorage

      Northern Crooked River Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 704
      Lat/Lon: 30 50.641 North/081 29.593 West
      Location: Northern branch of Crooked River lies west of flashing daybeacon #63A
      Minimum Depth: 7-feet, but use of a GPS chartplotter is STRONGLY recommended to avoid unmarked shoals along the river’s path
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 40 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Fair to poor; open to eastern and western winds

      Rating:

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    • Southern Crooked River Anchorage

      Southern Crooked River Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 706
      Lat/Lon: 30 49.511 North/081 30.094 West
      Location: southern section of Crooked River intersects the ICW south of unlighted daybeacon #70
      Minimum Depth: 12 feet, but use of a GPS chartplotter is strongly recommended to avoid unmarked shoals flanking the rivers’ southeasterly entrance
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 55 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Fair’ open to southeastern and northwestern winds

      Rating:

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    • Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage

      Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage
      Statute Mile: 711.5
      Lat/Lon: 30 46.235 North/081 28.240 West
      Location: on the wide channel running west of Cumberland Island, northeast of the ICW’s flashing buoy #34
      Minimum Depth: 8-feet
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 55 feet
      Foul Weather Shelter: Fair; open to northern southern and southwestern winds

      Rating:

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      Comments from Cruisers (14)

      1. Steve Lancaster -  March 25, 2014 - 3:46 pm

        A well protected anchorage. Tide is about 6 ft. Seacamp dock is the most popular, but further N is quieter. Park entry is $4 for seven consecutive days.
        Steve Lancaster

        Reply to Steve
      2. Marc and Shelley Colby -  April 25, 2013 - 10:00 am

        We spent a night at this anchorage. We went up the channel past the Park Services dock and opposite the next private dock further north. We anchored in firm mud of 8 ft. It was peaceful and quiet. The next morning we dinghied over to the Park Services dock and walked across the island to the beach. The oak tree forest was spectacular. We were there at 9:00 am and had the entire beach as far north or south as we could see all to ourselves. It was beautiful. We walked the beach south to the path that takes you to the ruins of the Carniege home. After walking the grounds we walked back north on the central road back to our dinghy. It was a pleasant morning and well worth the
        trip.
        Marc and Shelley Colby
        M/V Rock Chalk
        Endeavour 44 Trawlercat

        Reply to Marc
      3. Jack Pholeric -  April 24, 2013 - 8:33 am

        We anchored in 14 feet of water close to low tide. Dingyed to shore and tide up. We walked over to the ocean and then along the parrell trails. It is still beautiful. Consider a life time National Park pass if over 62. It covers the fee. We did not have time go to the museum.
        Jack Pholeric

        Reply to Jack
      4. Glen and Jill Moore -  October 29, 2012 - 10:44 am

        Cumberland Island has always been one of our favorite destinations and anchorages. There is much history, nature and beauty to be enjoyed. Many of our cruising friends just sailed by Cumberland Island on their annual treks up and down the east coast. After convincing them to stop at Cumberland, they stayed 5 days, exploring many areas of the island. They now visit every year.
        Glen and Jill Moore
        DeFever 40* Last Dance*

        Reply to Glen
      5. Mike -  October 29, 2012 - 9:55 am

        We have camped on Cumberland and boated there many times. The last time we took our son, his wife and two granddaughters and our Golden Retriever Midas to the north end ocean side for some fun on the beach.
        Mike

        Reply to Mike
      6. Mike and Mary Dickens -  August 22, 2012 - 2:12 pm

        We recently took our trawler, the Patricia Ann, on a 4-day cruise over to Cumberland Island, our favorite anchorage. We wanted to look for the white deer and walk the deserted beaches at dawn. We saw the white deer several years ago…actually we just caught a brief glimpse of them in the distance. Ever since, we have gone in search of white deer! They are not albinos but real white deer.
        We were up at 5 AM each morning as usual; the coffee was just beginning to brew and the aroma was delightful. And just a little while later, with coffee in hand, we watched from the flybridge as the sun began her climb over the horizon. A beautiful day was beginning with not a cloud in the sky.
        As we began our day with showers and breakfast, it dawned on us just how fortunate live-aboard cruisers really are. We can leave the dock for days on end and truly understand the term “freedom” and “independence”.
        Read more of our exploration of this island wilderness………
        http://paradiseyachtsales.blogspot.com/2011/03/trawler-living-aboard-tip-exploration.html
        Mike and Mary Dickens
        Paradise Yachts

        Reply to Mike
      7. Leigh Hough -  November 30, 2010 - 4:15 pm

        We stayed here for three nights, November 18-20. We rate it as the best reason to deploy the dinghy anywere on the ICW. The holding was great, there was plenty of room – there were 15 sailboats plus multiple powerboats at one point during our stay – using many different parts of the anchorage. It would probably hold twice that many.
        Going ashore and walking to the beach with our picnic (honor charge, $4/person, worth every penny) was one of the highlights of our trip south.
        There is reasonable protection from the east, less so from the west, and relatively little from north and south, but if you are well set you would be okay.

        Reply to Leigh
      8. Dick Litchfield -  May 22, 2010 - 7:01 pm

        Great anchorage and spot to visit. We visited the island and would like to do it again on the next trip.
        Holding was good for us despite reports of problems by other cruisers. We experienced a calm anchoring, but the anchorage is exposed to just about all wind directions. Wind with opposing current could make for a bumpy time.

        Reply to Dick
      9. Capt Bill, s/v Kittiwake -  November 6, 2009 - 5:02 pm

        Kittiwake, a Cape Doty 28 with CQR #25, and 25 feet 3/8″ chain, had no problem holding there, with a little opposing tide/wind – the island off port bow gives some nice protection from N, and bugs can blow off as well. The Cumberland Island ferry was extremely polite, slowing down as she past, as did the hotel boat.

        Reply to Capt
      10. Randy Pickelmann -  July 23, 2009 - 11:27 am

        Cumberland Island is a “must see”. There is a good anchorage there and you can take your pick of Park Service docks to tie up and go ashore. Truly an exceptional spot. Also, if the opportunity presents itself, anchor off Ft. Frederica for a night and go ashore for a look around.
        Regards,
        Randy Pickelmann
        Hard Aground in Clearwater
        MORNING STAR

        Reply to Randy
      11. Mike and Pat Sullivan -  July 23, 2009 - 11:23 am

        Don’t miss Cumberland Island just across the GA border at mile 711. Jeff and Susie Parker on “Idyll Time” suggested it, and we stopped here yesterday. The anchoage just off shore is perfect, and the island is spectacular. There are trees and other vegetation that is breathtaking, a beach that is nearly deserted and stretches for miles, old homes to see, endless hiking trails, and so on. It’s beautiful. Thanks Jeff and Susie.
        Mike and Pat Sullivan
        Aboard Irish Ayes – Gulfstar 44
        Anchored off Cumberland Island

        We definately second the second recommendation. Cumberland Island is truly spectacular. The wild horses let us get quite close for good photos as did the armadillos. It would be a crime not to stop and go ashore to explore this gem of an island.
        Melanie and John Wood
        m/v Diamond Lil

        Reply to Mike
      12. John & Pat Rodgers -  July 22, 2009 - 11:39 am

        Subject: Cumberland Island Anchorage
        Cruising News: I was surprised to read the posting about poor holding at Cumberland. We anchored Summertime just off the Sea Camp Dock over the New Year’s holiday as we have done many times in the past. Using a 35# CQR and 100 feet of chain in 20 feet, we were indeed secure even with 30 knot gusts on the first. True, the anchorage is open to the SW, but in any other wind, it is OK. Don’t miss the chance to anchor here and dingy ashore to explore one of the most interesting and beautiful islands in the SE.
        John & Pat Rodgers

        Reply to John
    • North River Anchorages

      North River Anchorages
      Statute Mile: 712.5
      Lat/Lon:
      30 43.937 North/081 31.353 West (anchorage in body of hairpin turn to the west)
      30 44.323 North/081 32.369 West (anchorage north of pulp mill)
      Location: North River divides the northern shores of the St. Marys River, north of flashing daybeacon #3
      Minimum Depth: 8-feet, but use of a GPS chartplotter is recommended to help avoid uncharted shoals shelving out from North River’s shoreline
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 34 feet in the anchorage in body of hairpin turn to the west and enough room for vessels up to 36 feet in the anchorage north of pulp mill
      Foul Weather Shelter: Good, particularly for the more upstream anchorage

      Rating:

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    • St. Marys River Anchorages

      St. Marys River Anchorages
      Statute Mile: 712.5
      Lat/Lon:
      30 42.427 North/081 32.273 West (anchorage southwest of flashing daybeacon #10)
      30 43.172 North/081 32.881 West (anchorage abeam of St. Marys (village) waterfront
      Location: located along the length of St. Marys River between flashing daybeacon #10 and the St. Marys village waterfront
      Minimum Depth: 11-feet
      Special Comment: Those making use of the anchorage southwest of flashing daybeacon #10 should be sure to anchor south of the channel’s centerline, AND show a bright anchor light!
      Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 50 to 55 feet depending on the particular anchorage chosen
      Foul Weather Shelter: Poor for anchorage southwest of flashing daybeacon #10, and Fair for anchorage abeam of St. Marys (village) waterfront

      Rating:   (downstream anchorage)
         (anchorage abeam of St. Marys village waterfront)

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      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Chris -  December 6, 2011 - 9:17 am

        We anchored off of st Marys town dock in march 2011. We chose a spot towards the south shore across the harbor from the main dock. After we anchored a guy in another boat came over and suggested we actually spend the night at the town dock as the current was so strong in that area. This sounded nice but I did not believe that was allowed by the town and chose to stay at anchor. The current through there was really unbelievable. Very fast. The sound of debris hitting the boat as it passed by and under us kept me up all night. Things going bump in the night. Our dingy has no engine. It rows very well but I did not dare leave the boat with it. I estimate 5 knots of current at times. The morning found wind and tide giving us a very slow drag to the west. I would not anchor here again. The downstream anchorage shown is where I would go. At least if you drag there is no one to hit and a soft landing. You need a motorized dingy though to safely get to and from town.
        Chris

        Reply to Chris
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