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Jeykyll Harbor Marina... a Cool Place to Beat the HeatLocated directly on the Intracoastal Waterway, Skidaway River at Mile 590, Marker 46-A, Latitude:   N  31o 58.78' , Longitude: W 081o 03.35' 2-354-8187Adventure Sailing - Authorized Amsoil Dealer and DistributorAmelia Island Yacht Basin - Marina and Boat Yard - Amelia Island FloridaRiviera Dunes Marina Just off Tampa Bay Owned and Operated by BoatersThe Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!Boca Grande Marina, Gasparilla Island, FloridaPort of Call, St. Augustine
Regatta Pointe MarinaThe FROLI System, developed in Germany has made a big hit with the USA  recreation and leisure travel market. Nickle Atlantic will be at the Annapolis Sail Boat Show, October 8 - 12, in Booth FULL MARINE SERVICE ON SITE TRANSIENT DOCKAGE WELCOMEBridge Pointe Marina, New Bern, NC Panoramic View of the Sunbury Harbor  Relaxed Laid-Back Atmosphere Fresh Steamed Blue Crabs caught Daily Homemade Crab Cakes and Crab StewRestaurant offers a Full-Service BarSunday Home-Cooking LunchDockside Cafe - Marathon, Florida on Boot Key Harbor

Archive For: Georgia – News1 – Savannah River to Savannah

  • A Tour of the Area around ICW/Savannah River Junction, AICW Statute Mile 575

    Captain Jim Healy

    Captain Jim Healy

    Most of our postings dealing with Savannah speak of cruising west from the Waterway, up the Savannah to downtown Savannah, certainly a delightful sidetrip. SSECN Contributing Editor, Captain Jim Healy, gives an account of the areas around the Savannah River/ICW junction, including Thunderbolt and Tybee Island. Thank you Jim – definitely a good read!

    savannah
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    Sail Harbor Marina is on Wilmington Island, GA. Their website is: www.sailharbormarina.com/

    Enjoyed reading this post by Capt. Jim. We always enjoy visiting Savannah by boat. Bought our last boat @ Sail Harbor and had the yard haul and do some work after the survey. The bottom Job is still good now nearly 3 years later. Exceptional service and came in under estimate which is always good. Highly recommend their staff for repairs and service.
    Sonny

  • Ice Cream Shop Recommendation in Savannah, GA, Savannah River off the AICW

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    Savannah Waterfront – Click for Chartview

    Ice cream is often the most sought after commodity whenever going ashore, regardless the time of day. When in Savannah, enjoy the recommendation offered by Skipper Susan Landry, co-owner of Beach House Publications, publishers of “The Great Book of Anchorages,” (http://www.tgboa.com)

    It is well worth the trip up the Savannah River to sample Leopold’s Ice Cream. They have been in business for almost 100 years and all of the ice cream is made on the premises from their own secret recipes. A short walk down Abercorn to Broughton Street from the waterfront will have you there in no time. This place is a feast for the eyes and ears as well with 10 cent jukebox and original décor.
    Susan Landry

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Waterfront

  • Good Words for River Street Market Place Dock, Savannah River, Savannah, GA

    Savannah Waterfront - Click for Chartview

    Here are good words for River Street Market Place Dock as originally posted on Trawler Forum, http://www.trawlerforum.com/. River Street Market Place Dock is located on the Savannah River in downtown Savannah.

    If you want to be downtown, the River Street waterfront is best. Just fender up, put away, lockup and enjoy. You will not lack for activity both on the water and in town.
    Don on “Moonstruck”

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Waterfront

  • The Case For Cruising Upstream on Savannah River to Savannah, GA

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!Whenever I get together with a group of cruisers interested in exploring Georgia’s coastal waters, the topic always seems to arise about whether it’s better to berth at one of the several transient friendly marinas in Thunderbolt, GA, and then take a taxi into the Savannah Historic District, or cruise upstream to Savannah, and spend some time at SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, Savannah Hyatt Docks, or one of the other downtown Savannah facilities. A part of these discussions the possibility is almost always raised at to whether your vessel will be jostled by the wake of a passing freighter or other ocean going vessel. Happily, Captain Tom reports below that he did not encounter any such problems during his visit.

    For years, I have read how rough the wakes are on the Savannah River, right downtown; but pleaded with myself to give it a personal try. It was actually fine. The big freighters which pass on average once an hour do not kick up the water that much, the tugs and ferries some more but still not uncomfortable. The only major wake maker was a Coast Guard vessel making a non-emergency run so fast that he was sending water over the top of his boat too.
    Savannah has so much to offer in history and culinary delight. Patsy and I have not had so much excellent Southern cooking in our memory, even the grits were always done properly. A history buff could stay on the River forever and still learn new things.
    Then, there is the River itself. TV could not hold a candle to the entertainment of seeing the River activity with so many boats coming and going or people just walking the river side.
    The dockage rates are high but well worth the experience. Include Savannah in your cruising plans.
    Stay safe,
    Tom

    We are on the Savannah River docks right now. We always stop here going N and S. Take the visitors center elevator to town level and walk up Bull St. You see all the best squares of the town. It is not too bad wake wise. Huge container ships come and go all night. Last night though I awoke to a very loud blast that in my sleep sounded like my alarm clock. It was a freighters horn which lasted over a minute right outside the boat.
    At least on this stop the trumpet player looking for tips, who repeated “the Saints ” incessantly and badly played, was missing. It’s all part of the experience.
    Greg Han

    I, too recommend a trip up the river to Savannah. Most of the time you are fine, but the occasional heavy wake does mean you should take some extra care tieing up and put out your biggest fenders. You are right in the middle of Savannah, so it is great for enjoying the restaurants, strolling, and the night life. It is one of the most walkable cities on the ICW, though there is no large grocery store nearby–enjoy the many great eateries. One night I heard a loud saxophone playing and stuck my head out of the hatch to find out we were the scenic backdrop for a live musician performing before a large crowd.
    John Kettlewell

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah Hyatt Docks

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Westin Savannah Harbor

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah City Recreational Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Hyatt Docks and the Downtown Savannah Waterfront

  • Excellent Cruising Advice from Brunswick, GA to Thunderbolt, GA.

    Thanks to our good friend, Captain Jim Healy, for this summary of cruising tips and recommendations covering the long trek north or south on the AICW between Brunswick and Thunderbolt, Georgia. Captain Jim’s excellent article below is reprinted from the AGCLA Forum (http://www.greatloop.org).

    Brunswick (Morningstar’s Golden Isles Marina) to Thunderbolt (Thunderbolt Marina) is 93.9 StM miles, which we do, nominally, in 10-11 hrs, depending on tides. Not too bad in July, with longer hours of daylight. Requires planning in November, with shorter hours of daylight. It would be around 100 StM miles from Brunswick Landing Marina in downtown Brunswick to Thunderbolt.
    This stretch has some of the shallowest water on the entire US East Coast at low tide. The tidal range in the region is 6 – 7 feet. At 4-1/2 ft, you won’t have a problem, but it would be most desirable for you to make the transit with high tide at mid-day. That way, you depart on a rising tide, travel with good water, and arrive before low tide. Said another way, avoid the Little Mud River +/- 2 hours of “neap,” low tide, and +/- 3 hours of “spring” low tide; in English, that’d be +/- 3 hrs around new moon/full moon.
    There are many, many exquisite anchorage options along that route, including the Duplin River, Crescent River and Walburg Island. There are just a few marina choices. Marina reviews are all fair-to-good, but navigation for a larger boat, particularly near low tide, *may* be tricky, so call ahead to whichever on you select if marinas are your thing. Just north of Brunswick is Hidden Harbor on Troup Creek. Across the Ogeechee R. as you come through Hell Gate, northbound, is Delegal Creek with Delegal Marina (pronounced: deli-gal). There is a sandbar at the entrance of Delegal Creek, and Delegal Marina will send a boat out to meet you and guide you in. At approx MM613 is Kilkenny Creek with Kilkenny Creek Marina. Kilkenny has a reputation for being a particularly “quaint” stop in rural outback Georgia. And just 45 min-to-an-hour south of Thunderbolt is Isle of Hope Marina. There are several Marinas in Thunderbolt; we use
    Thunderbolt Marina for easy access, good facilities and daily Crispy Creme donuts delivered to the boat in the morning by 07h00. Both Isle of Hope and Thunderbolt Marina are good places to stop longer for a visit to the City of Savannah. THERE IS A LOT TO SEE AND DO IN SAVANNAH. DO NOT SKIP SAVANNAH! My admiral prefers the Thunderbolt locale to the Savannah City docks, which she feels are too public, although I prefer the City Dock for excellent convenience to downtown. (As I said, we stay at Thunderbolt Marina. Admirals outrank Captains except when the ship is under way on the water.)
    Hope this is useful.
    Peg and Jim Healy aboard Sanctuary

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Morningstar Golden Isles Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Anchorage Directory Listing For Duplin River Anchorage

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Anchorage Directory Listing For Crescent River Anchorage

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Anchorage Directory Listing For Walburg Creek Anchorage

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Brunswick Landing Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Hidden Harbor Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Delegal Creek Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Kilkenny Creek Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Isle of Hope Marina

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Thunderbolt Marine

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Savannah City Docks

  • Up the Savannah River to Savannah, GA (near St. M. 575.5)

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!On 4/22/13, as part of a NE Florida – Georgia Wish List, we posed the following question:

    Statute Mile 575.5 – Who has cruised upstream on Savannah River, and spent a night or two along the downtown Savannah Waterfront? Where did you stay – the city dock, the Westin or River Street Market? Did you have trouble being jostled by the wake of passing, larger, ocean going freighters or tankers? How did you enjoy downtown Savannah?

    Responses follow:

    My better half and I have stayed both at the Hyatt dock and at the Market Street dock. Both are accommodating but neither is what I would call a first class facility. Wifi and cable were “iffy” at best. And yes, to answer your question more specifically, the large boat traffic did keep us bouncing around some, and the clunk of tree limbs and other flotsam on its way to the ocean also created some anx. However, it is all worth it to visit and tour River Street and to take a horse and buggy ride through that beautiful city. Our favorite restaurants are “Vics on the River”, and just off the river, but within walking distance is the “Blue Safire” Restaurant. We would recommend the visit and these restaurants enthusiastically.
    Tom Wilson

    We stayed at the City Marina when we went to Savannah. The dock master was very helpful. Easy walk to the shops and all the restaurants. Ate at Paula Deans. Don’t let the line fool you. We only waited about twenty minutes. They have dining on multiple levels of the building. The two nights we were there we only remember a few ships coming by. They were in the middle of the night. The wake was not that bad.
    Rho-Jo

    We agree with the above posting. The only addition is that if you are tied to any of the docks on the River Street side (Hyatt, City docks) that you make sure your lines are not too tight and that they are long, meaning do not do a short tie from dock cleat to the boat cleat, since when you do get rocked by some of the large ships, your boat had room to “swing” and not tug on your lines too hard. IN fact, using a smaller diameter line is also better since it can stretch better than a large diameter. If you do not do this, you run the risk of pulling a cleat out of your boat. Use plenty of fenders too since one may “pop out” during the rocking. This is always good advice anyway in many situations, but especially here. You will see where some cleats are damaged on docks, I suppose from boats that did not heed this advice.
    John Winter

    Click Here To View the Eastern Florida Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah Hyatt Dock

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Hyatt Dock

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of River Street Market Place Dock

  • Westin Savannah Harbor – Savannah River, Across From Downtown Savannah Waterfront

    On 4/22/13, as part of a NE Florida – Georgia Wish List, we posed the following question:

    Statute Mile 575.5 – Who has cruised upstream on Savannah River, and spent a night or two along the downtown Savannah Waterfront? Where did you stay – the city dock, the Westin or River Street Market? Did you have trouble being jostled by the wake of passing, larger, ocean going freighters or tankers? How did you enjoy downtown Savannah?

    Responses follow:

    Claiborne,
    This is in response to your request for NE/FL wish list items and our response for Savannah Westin Resort/Marina:
    We spent two nights across from historic Savannah at the Westin Resort/Marina starting on April 7, 2013. It was our first visit to this city as we decided to get off the waterway and broaden our view a bit as we make our way north on our 37′ sailing vessel. Be cautious as you enter the river up to Savannah from northbound on the waterway as it is not easy to pick up even large commercial traffic until you are almost into the channel. We used the Shipfinder app on the iPhone here since we do not have onboard AIS and it allowed us to slow for an inbound container ship. Did the same thing on departure allowing us to follow a departing large commercial vessel we would not have seen until we had pulled away from the dock. There is room here on the sides for us little folks, but not a lot in some places.
    The Westin is a floating face dock about 250′ long, it is not a marina in that it has no fuel or pump out, and showers if you need them are a bit of a walk over to the golf club house. To reserve a spot you must call the hotel concierge who at least for us was hard to reach. You as well must leave a credit card to hold a spot. Upon arrival there are no dock staff or anyone on the VHF so you must again call the concierge. She dispatched the hotel “engineers”, but they arrived after we had already gotten ourselves tied up. We had timed our arrival and later departure to be near slack tide because there is significant current here and we expected no help here from reading other postings. The engineers did have keys to unlock the power pedestals and provided a 50A to 30A adapter since no direct 30A service was available. The price is currently $3.00 per foot which is high for what is provided. There is currently really only room for about 2-3
    transient vessels in the 40′ range because a beautiful historic sailing ship the Roseway(120′) is docked there for 6 weeks with daily river cruises. They need a lot more than their length to depart and return. Deploy all your largest bumpers when you tie up here or at the public docks across the way because you get some serious rocking from very large commercial ships going by 24/7. The escorting
    tugs run closer to the sides with even bigger wakes. The public rooms at the Westin are very nice, they have free bikes that you can use and the heated pool is great. Food was a bit pricey but very good for our one dinner.
    With that said we are very glad we stopped. A free ferry runs from the Westin across the river every 30 minutes with two convenient stops. The town is well worth visiting with good food, great historic sites and homes, and just fun to walk about. We are happy we picked the Westin over the town docks since all the waterfront tourists are walking right along side your vessel which is really not for us. If we visit Savannah again we would plan to stop at Thunderbolt or Isle of Palms and take the regular bus up to Savannah, but it would not be the same experience.
    Harry Burns
    S/V Two for the Roads

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Westin Savannah Harbor

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Westin Savannah Harbor

  • GREAT NEWS – Live Aboard Cruisers Now Welcome in Georgia Waters

    The message below comes to us from Charlie Waller, owner of Isle of Hope Marina (A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, and past president of the Georgia Marine Business Owners Association.  Charlie and his organization have been working tirelessly to get the archaic, often ignored, but still a threat, regulation limiting boat owners to a 30 day stay aboard, changed.  Congratulations to “GAMBA,” and everyone else who worked for this change.
    As Charlie explains below, now, by filling out a simple form, cruisers can stay aboard for up to a year in Georgia waters! Finally, a real victory for the cruising community!!!

    Claiborne,
    Good News!
    The State of Georgia has just modified the Live-Aboard rule so that it will be legal and practical to say on board your boat in Georgia for more than 30 days. A rule change will allow boaters to fill out a simple form to receive permission to be onboard for up to one year in Georgia so long as the boat is docked at a marina that meets the state’s minimum requirements for pump-out facilities. Isle of Hope Marina and just a couple of other marinas currently meet those standards, but I expect that other marinas will upgrade their facilities to take advantage of this rule change. I am heading a committee that will be working with the DNR to finalize the application form in the next few weeks. The rule change will be effective January 1, 2012.
    Charlie Waller
    Isle of Hope Marina

    Below, we present a wide cross section of responses from the cruising community to this change in Georgia’s live-aboard regulations, As you will see, some cruisers are very appreciative, others question why any regulation is needed and/or justified, and at least one fellow captain points out the process of applying to live aboard in Georgia waters for more than 30 days is not necessarily “simple.”

    We had a similar problem in Washington State years ago. The head of our DNR just flatly wanted no live aboards at all. We formed the Washington Live Aboards and fought and won. The big issues now is raw sewage being dumped and soap when washing your boat.
    The best advise I can give is get together with the marina owners and managers, develop rules dealing with sewage and pump outs. Be proactive and get in front of the issue. Getting teamed up with marinas gives you more credability and greater influnce.
    Final thought, don’t bad mouth the state and govermental officals its difficult to further your point of view if they’re pissed at you.
    We work closely with Seattle, Tacoma and Everett and they are all pro live aboards and help keep DNR in check.
    Detlev Willoughby
    President Tacoma Live Aboards, VP of the Washington Live Aboards

    The Seattle situation is still evolving, but it is shaping up to be about greywater. The City of Seattle has proposed limiting liveaboards (where marinas will accept them) to 25% of available slips. Current LABs will be allowed to stay, but once they leave the marina can’t rent to another LAB until they come below the 25% cap. The City has also proposed imposing a fee on marinas that accept LABs and additional administrative burdens. We all know that this will discourage private marina owners from renting to LABs and that the costs will flow downstream. My question re the Georgia situation is: what happens at the end of one year? That’s a good development for cruisers wanting to stay more than a month, but what’s the impact on full time residents of the state?
    Gail L.

    I think the title of this piece should be changed to “Liveaboards now tolerated at a few marinas in Georgia.” The word “welcome” does not come to mind. Like other long-term cruisers I prefer to anchor out, which means I won’t be living aboard in Georgia waters any time in the near future. By the way, I still highly recommend the beautiful ICW waters of Georgia for those who like to anchor and get away from it all–just don’t stay in one place for more than 30 days.
    John Kettlewell

    THANKS FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL CRUISERS
    Bill

    Thanks Charlie!!!
    Betsy Basch

    Oh Goddie! The awful is now only bad.
    Why should I need a States permission to live on my boat? And why should I be forced to pay for dockage to do so?
    I use a composting head and had have no need for pump-out facilities. My water and electric needs are also self met. I much prefer to live on the hook.
    Bad precedent to set or accept. My opinion is that Georgia is still a place to pass through until this law is totally abandoned.
    Philip

    Charlie has done a great job along with many other people to help the liveaboard community.
    We & MANY others each year just go off shore to avoid Georgia since they still JUST DON’T get it. They need to make their portion of the ICW navigatible at ALL tide levels. Our money their loss!
    We feel sorry for all the businesses that are struggling, but until Georgia catches up with the rest of the world we & many others will just go off shore & NOT put up with the hassel!
    Mike M/V Elan

    Actually it is a little more complicated than just “filling out a simple form”. The 30 day law has not changed, now you must file for an extension of the 30day rule. You have to file for the extension to the Commissioner of the Georgia DNR. The commissioner, in his or her sole discretion, may grant or deny any request for an extension of time to occupy a live-aboard.
    Again it is not just a simple form you must meet the following Eligibility requirements:
    1. No live-aboard may be occupied in Georgia coastal waters subject to the jurisdiction of the CMPA for more than 30 days during any calendar year unless the live-aboard owner has been granted an extension of time in writing by the Commissioner.
    2. The applicant shall submit a written request for an extension to the Commissioner.
    3. The Commissioner shall promptly consider any written request that meet the following requirements.
    a. The applicant submits the request on the application form provided by the Department to the Commissioner, c/o the Coastal Resources Division, One Conservation Way, Brunswick, Georgia 31520.
    b. The Coastal Resources Division receives the request at least 15 calendar days prior to the requested extension start date.
    c. The applicant certifies that the live-aboard has a secured mechanism to prevent discharge of treated and untreated sewage.
    Examples of secured mechanisms considered to be effective at preventing discharge include, but are not limited to, closing the seacock and padlocking, using a non-releasable wire tie, or removing the seacock handle (with the seacock closed).
    d. The applicant certifies that they will not discharge any sewage, treated or untreated, into Georgia coastal waters subject to the jurisdiction of the CMPA.
    e. The applicant certifies that the live-aboard is capable of being used as a means of transportation on the water and is capable of safe, mechanically-propelled, navigation under average Georgia coastal wind and current conditions.
    f. The applicant identifies the eligible marina at which the live-aboard operator will moor the live-aboard.
    g. The applicant provides written documentation of a slip rental agreement with an eligible marina.
    h. The applicant states the reasons for requesting the extension and the period of time for which the extension is requested.
    Doesn’t seem that simple to me! Is working with the government ever simple? When you give them all that information you have given them all they need to through you out of the state and band you from ever entering the state on your way to Florida.
    What about the fines when you break one of their laws?
    There is no fee or tax this first year!
    What other state do you have to go before a Commissioner to live in that state?
    Kevin R. Quinn

    I don’t see this as a victory for cruisers at all. It is a victory for the marinas. Many of us anchor whenever possible and stay away from marina life and all its distractions and expense. Trust me, I will continue to go outside and bypass Georgia altogether. My dollars are much better spent elsewhere.
    Jerry Simpson

    At long last. Thanks to all who brought this about. It makes sense.
    Diana Prentice

    I have to agree with the other posters–the title of this blog entry is complete propaganda. Shame on you for trying to spin this as some great win/win situation for boaters. As if we are too stupid to figure out for ourselves what the real facts are! Pathetic.
    That form is the opposite of simple, INO. And way too intrusive, asking too many questions that have zero to do with the idea of living for a while in Georgia waters.
    The sad thing is, that with this guy ‘fighting’ for us boaters, we can expect that the status quo for Georgia to boaters will continue for the foreseeable future. The Georgia ‘solution’ isn’t a solution at all, as obviously made note of ad nauseum above by most boaters responding. So I agree, we will continue to avoid lingering in Georgia waters. I can’t imagine how much money the marinas lose in Georgia because of the attitude of the State.
    Alan Avante

    Go to the bahamas instead. I was going to cruise North for a change, but with Georgias new regs and St. Augustines new 10 day anchoring limits upcoming why should I spend my money and time where I am not wanted. Please do not spend money in any places that are not cruiser friendly.
    Dave C.

  • Cruising Upstream on Savannah River to Savannah, GA

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!We certainly agree with Captains Tammy and Michael that a trip upstream on Savannah River to its like named city is well worth your while, with the understanding that your vessel might (or might not) be severely rocked by the bow wave of a passing freighter. However, with all the negative comments here on the Cruisers’ Net about the Savannah City Dock, we strongly suggest you coil your lines at SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, the Savannah Hyatt Docks.

    I would save the visit to the historic section of savannah by taking the boat to the downtown city dock. You get an occasional wake but nothing horrible. The beauty is you are right in the center of the district with no need to deal with cars. If you do want to do some grocery shopping, they used to have a free bus that did a loop and stopped at a kroger grocery store.
    Savannah is a great stop.
    Tammy & Michael

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah Hyatt Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Downtown Savannah Waterfront and the Savannah Hyatt Docks

  • Captain Ted Jones Visits Savannah, GA on the Savannah River off the AICW

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!Savannah Hyatt Dock flanks the southern banks of Savannah River, just west of the Savannah City Docks.

    I suggested to Malla that it would be a shame to be so close to Savannah, Georgia to miss the opportunity to visit this historic and architypical southern city. It is 20 miles or so out of the way to go up the Savannah River to the city, but we agreed to do it as, if our plans for the future are followed, we will not be back this way again.
    I checked out the three facilities on the river which offer transient accommodations and called the municipal dock. The dockmaster cut me off as he was in the midst of assisting a 75 footer, promising to return my call within the hour. We were put off by this facility as it offered no showers, so I wasn’t terribly disappointed when my call was not returned.
    Instead, I called the Hyatt, which is located next to City Hall and has 414 feet of dock on the river. I expected the dock to be full of 100 foot megayachts, but Jennifer, the dockmaster, said there was plenty of room and even a 30 amp outlet she could put us near (they advertise 50 and 100 amp service only). We went for that even at the price of $3/foot. The advertised ammenities seemed worth it at only 50-cents more than the other dock. The third facility is at an even more splendiferous hotel than the Hyatt, but it is on the South Carolina side of the river. Even though they offered free ferry
    service to the Savannah waterfront, we decided not to go there. We would rather have the old port a step off O.G’s deck.
    While we were there, several very large container ships passed by, blocking our view of the opposite shoreline, and so close you could almost reach out and touch them. The ships appear to be longer than the river is wide, and there’s a bend in the river right where we were docked. The pilots must really be on their toes here, yet on more than one ship I saw several officers on wing bridges, taking photographs of the historic riverfront as unconcerned as the gawking tourists who took pictures of the passing ships. The Savannah waterfront is very photogenic, and we took our share of pictures.
    We had an fair tidal current when we got back on the ICW but it was not far to the Savannah River where the ebb was flowing vigorously. The current was strong, and we made good less than 4 knots pushing upstream. There is a short cut behind Elba Island, but a 30 foot clearance bridge blocked our passage, costing us several miles going around the long way. Jennifer met us and helped us tie up, giving us the lowdown on what to do, how to do it, and how to find it. I asked
    about staying longer than the noon check out time, and she said she was in no hurry to see us leave, suggesting we take the historic bus tour before we departed.
    We checked in at the hotel’s front desk and were given a card to display on the boat to indicate that we were paid guests. I listed the date we had arrived and the departure date, and the desk clerk quoted a price double the single night fee. I pointed out that we were only staying one night, and the clerk seemed to be correcting the entry he had made in the computer. Malla didn’t look at the amount and we didn’t discover until we had left that we had been charged for one and a half nights. Jennifer will hear about this on Monday.*
    The shower (only one, but very sumptuous) was in the exercise room by the pool. One needed a room key to A) get into the hotel, B) work the elevator, and C) get into the fitness center. No big deal, but it meant taking turns to use the shower, etc.
    Savannah’s is a fascinating waterfront, kinda like Newport on steroids. The old cotton warehouses line River Street, complete with a railroad spur and cobblestones from sailing ship’s ballast. The warehouses are three story affairs, now housing shops and restaurants, the top floor connected to the adjacent square, at a higher level, by metal walkways. We climbed up the cobblestones to the park above, and walked to the historic district a few blocks away. Almost everything is pristine and authentic from colonial times.
    We were both tired from a busy day on the water, so returned to O.G. before dark after sampling the fare at a Greek restaurant.
    We took the 0900 bus tour to learn about historic Savannah. The driver was uninspired. I suppose it is difficult to be inspiring and witty at 0900 on Saturday morning, but I would have preferred a canned schpiel. It didn’t help that those in the back of the bus continued to talk amongst themselves instead of listening to the driver. I was very disappointed. I was annoyed that the bus spent more time in the business district and sped through the residential streets making it
    difficult to appreciate Savannah’s architectural splendor which is really what I wanted to see and hear about.
    We had an early, unremarkable lunch on River Street, and made a brief visit to the tall ship docked nearby offering “Free Tours.” I couldn’t find out much about her except that she was built in Brazil, a barkentine (look it up on Wikopedia as I did but only to confirm what I thought it was). The hull and rig were unimpressive, but she was nicely finished inside. Then we were gone down river, with the current, by 1300.
    Captain Ted Jones

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah Hyatt Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah Hyatt Dock

  • Bureaucracy Woes at Savannah City Docks, Savannah, GA (Savannah River, off the AICW)

    It’s unfortunate when communications get crossed up which can easily be the case when municipal services are involved. Despite any limitations, Savannah City Docks has…LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! We’re glad Jeff survived his run-in with bureaucracy with a sense of humor!

    Don’t waste your valuable time heading for this dock. I called a week ago asked for a reservation, I was told it was 1st come 1st served. NOT TRUE. After tying up (and surviving a divorce) got all set and headed off to pay, we were ready for a little nightlife after many nights up the icw on the hook. Well we phoned a lady by the name of Shawn, we were told we could not stay as there were boats coming in with RESERVATIONS! I told Shawn that we were the only boat, 42′ at the end of the 250 foot dock. She did not seem to care and suggested a dock further up river at $3.50 per foot. It is now 8 PM, five hours later, we had dinner across from the city dock and the dock is still completely empty. Now I need a divorce lawyer.
    Skipper Jeff

    I think it sounds like a scam to send business elsewhere and a call should be made to the city with a complaint about this.
    Susan Dawson

    We had a similar problem last year on Memorial Day. We were run off as well. We were told first come-first serve and when you get there there is a number to call. Nobody answered, and next thing you know a police officer came by and made us all leave.
    Sea Huddle

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah City Docks

  • Hyatt Dock, River Street, Savannah, GA, off the AICW

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!Savannah Hyatt Dock flanks the southern banks of Savannah River, just west of the Savannah City Docks.

    Cruising News*: The Hyatt Docks on the Savannah River have been updated and are open to boats 25 ft and up. 416 ft of docks offer electric, water and cable included in the rental fee. The Hyatt also has BoatUS and other seasonal discounts. The Hyatt is right in the middle of the Historic district and everything is close by. The Hyatt also offers many services not offered anywhere else on the river. Jennifer Crovatt runs the docks and is very helpful with questions and local resources. If you are heading to Savannah this is by far the best option. Cheers.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah Hyatt Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah Hyatt Dock

  • How to Pay at Savannah City Docks, off the AICW on the Savannah River (downtown Savannah, GA)

    Many have expressed frustration over the payment process at these well-located docks on the waterfront in Savannah. Now we have step-by-step directions!

    Stayed at the Savannah City docks for one night on Nov 18th. There is a sign on the docks but for some reason it doesn’t tell you how to pay! To pay ($1.50/ft incl elect and water) you need to go up the alley and two blocks in towards the center of town between two hotels to the parking garage and pay there. Very friendly and helpful folks.
    Captain Dick Turner

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah City Docks

  • Savannah City Docks No Longer Free, off the AICW in Savannah, GA

    The Savannah City Docks flank the Savannah River’s southerly banks, in the heart of downtown Savannah and had been free to boaters for many years. We have JUST updated our info on the Savannah City Docks in our “Georgia Marina Directory’ section. It took forever to actually get a responsible person on the telephone who could answer questions. The short version is these docks are no longer free.

    Has anyone stopped at the River St docks in Savannah recently? Have they started any new policies of charging and enforcement?
    Captains Greg and Susan Han aboard Allegria

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah City Docks

  • A Preference for River Street Market Place Dock, Savannah, GA

    The River Street Market Place is the southernmost of the three marinas along Savannah’s historic waterfront and is adjacent to the Savannah City Docks. The downstream current here can be swift, but the floating face docks allow manageable tie-ups.

    I agree with Pascal. If you want to be in downtown Savannah, this is a good place to be. We walked by the city dock and the power pedestals were covered with trash bags. Somehow, you’re supposed to pay at the parking garage. Also, they don’t take reservations, The River Street Market Place Dock does. It should be noted that this is a “dock”, little more. There are no showers and the restrooms are shared with customers of the River Street Market Place and are locked at night. You do have power and water at no extra charge. No ice either although Chaz volunteered to go get us some. The wakes from ships are not bad, but an occasional private boat or the ferry may produce a wake bigger than you might like. If we return to Savannah, this is where we’ll stay.
    Captain Ron

    The River Street docks are the place to be and Chaz is ultra helpful. There is a lot of shipping traffic (it’s the second busiest port on the east coast) and we enjoyed watching the big ships go by. You can go to the marinetraffic.com website and see the ships moving up and down the Savannah River and get terrific information about each ship. You can also turn the radio to channels 16 and 13 and listen to the ships and tugs. Savannah is a great city to visit.
    Captain Ted Williams

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For River Street Market Place Dock

  • Savannah City Dock Is Open (Downtown Savannah – Savannah River)

    The report below, which originally appeared on the MTOA List-Serve, was in response to earlier reports here on the Cruisers’ Net and other nautical lists, which reported the Savannah City Docks were going to be closed for some time to come on Mondays through Wednesdays for maintenance work. Then, we saw reports that these closures were a thing of the past, so I removed the earlier posting here on the Net. From what Captain Feller says below, sounds like you’d better call ahead to make sure. Follow the link below for a telephone number.
    Also, you could always moor at the River Street Market Place Dock, just a tad farther downstream. This facility is also within easy walking distance of Savannah’s wonderful historic district, and its many, many dining attractions.

    The phone said it would be closed Mon-Wed, we got here today (Thu) and the worker said it was CLOSED! But not to worry, they got what they needed done and opened the docks this evening….there will b work being done in the next couple of weeks so b sure to call ahead…..ps we found out if u pull into the hyatt dock, u can stay for up to 4 hrs if u buy something in there lounge….cokes count….fyi.
    Bill Feller
    Knot Tide Down

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah City Docks

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For River Street Market Place Dock

  • Savannah City Dock Now Charging Overnight Dockage Fees (Savannah River)

    So much for free dockage in downtown Savannah! With these new fees, cruisers may want to seriously consider tying their lines at River Street Market Place Dock, just a touch farther downstream, or making use of a marina at nearby Thunderbolt or Isle of Hope. From these latter facilities, it’s only a quick taxi ride into the Savannah Historic and Downtown Business District.

    The City of Savannah is preparing to once again charge for docking at the Riverfront Plaza facilities. Per a phone conversation with Shawn Emerson of the Mobility and Parking Services Department, the policy will be in place by the end of May. Bottom line is the fee will be $1.50/ft for 24 hours. Tieing up for less than 3 hours is free. Complete information may be found on the Waterway Guide or City of Savannah websites.
    Ted Stehle
    Waterway Guide/Skipper Bob Publications

    It will be interesting to see how the boating market responds to this. Even though the location is excellent my experience is that the free nature is the main draw of the site. The hotels docks nearby charge around double the 1.50/ft but you have some services especially water and real electricity not the 15amp service (on GFI sockets that do not work with my boat) and that sometimes work and sometimes not. Water bibs are in bad repair and only a few for the whole dock.
    I have made this a regular stop but will now have to re-evaluate stopping at Thunderbolt instead. This will free up space for the locals who come to enjoy and afternoon and do not stay overnight and who were probably complaining about all the freeloaders who stayed for days and took all the space.
    Aw I will probably stop there again in the fall and pay the freight and remember the good ol days.
    Greg and Susan Han
    Key Biscayne, FL
    Allegria — Krogen Whaleback #16

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah City Docks

  • Captain Arnold Reports on Cruising the Georgia AICW

    There is a passel of useful cruising news in Captain Arnold’s long posting below. Pay particulary attention to his description of visiting downtown Savannah. Wish I could join our “made Englishmen” at “Abes” for a drink of Mount Gay Rum tonight (see below)!

    Subject: Cruising Georgia
    Cruising News: After (officially) the coldest winter ever in Florida, it’s a relief to again have warmer climes while slowly cruising north “as the azealas bloom”.
    Some comments possibly of interest to “snowbirds” enjoying the ICW in Georgia.
    1) Bad shoaling to report in the Little Mud River – I registered around 5 ft mid tide and mid channel. At one point the mud blocked up my knotmeter (yet again).
    2) A delightful mooring for sure is the Wahoo River at Mile 630. 15ft or so of water and not too bad a current with good solid anchor holding.
    3) The infamous Hell Gate cut (Mile 602) has recently been dredged and showed no problems except fairly substantial cross currents. Stay in mid channel and you should be OK.
    4) Following irreverent tradition I was able to quaff a gin and tonic and under a full moon armed with such moonshine I managed to moon the Moon River. There are not many people can make such a claim with any degree of authentication.
    5) Kilkenny Marina offers a low overnight transient fee, lower than normal diesel cost, and rustic surroundings of bygone days. Watch out for those no see ‘ums however.
    6) A pleasant mooring just south of Isle of Hope Marina and you can either dinghy in for general facilities at a sight fee – or dock at everage rate. Very friendly and worth a stroll ashore.
    7) Pick an incoming tide to go up-river to Savannah which offers one of the best Free City Docks on the ICW – even including free power and water! You’re right downtown in the Historic District and while touristy it does offer some delightful strolls in the many parks covered in azaleas. Churchills Pub now alas only opens after 5pm but a great little local bar is ‘Abes’ on Lincoln Street very close to the dock. Avoid the costly tour buses but at any normal bus stop the Free Shuttle arrives every half hour to take you to Kroegers grocery store and others. Riverside Park can get a bit noisy at night (it was Spring Break for me) but people walking by constantly seemed to get more enjoyment watching my cat than the variety of guitar players and break dancers. Once a week the City Dock is cleared to allow an American Cruise boat to dock – so check with the Visitors Centre. Overall I would say – Savannah is a MUST. Thank heavens Sherman left it standing!
    Soon , fully provisioned and all systems GO, I will set off slowly for Charleston where, as yet, I have failed to find any free dock -or even any marina with low transient rates. If anyone knows of such, please let me know.
    Happy Cruising to one and to all.
    Cap’n Arnold

  • Pink House Restaurant – Downtown Savannah, Georgia

    Captain Arnold’s photo is of the Pink House Restaurant in Savannah, Georgia. He’s quite right. It IS one of our favorites, and pretty much everyone else’s favorite for that matter. Don’t miss it!!!
    Cruisers berthing in Thunderbolt or Isle of Hope, can easily take a taxi to and from the Pink House!

    And here I am in Savannah – here’s a favourite restaurant of yours I believe. Sunshine and azaleas – Spring has sprung at last
    Best
    Cap’n Arnold

    One of the South’s top restaurants. Have dined here many times. Highly reco’d.
    Capt Dave

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