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Archive For: Georgia – News1 – Savannah River to Savannah

  • LNM: Coast Guard closes the port of Savannah, Brunswick

    Coast Guard sets port condition Zulu, closes the port of Savannah, Brunswick

    CHARLESTON, S.C. — Effective 12 a.m. Sunday, the Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) set port condition Zulu for the Ports of Savannah and Brunswick and all other terminals and facilities due to the expectation of sustained gale force winds of generated by Hurricane Irma that may arrive within 12 hours.

    Sustained winds between 39 and 54 mph are possible within 12 hours. Mariners are reminded there are no safe havens in these facilities, and ports are safest when the inventory of vessels is at a minimum.

    While port condition Zulu is in place no vessels may enter or transit within these ports without permission of the COTP. All vessel movements are prohibited at this time, and all ship-to-shore operations must cease.

  • LNM: Coast Guard sets port condition Yankee in Savannah, Brunswick

    Coast Guard sets port condition Yankee in Savannah, Brunswick

    CHARLESTON, S.C. — Effective 12 p.m. Saturday, the Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) set port condition Yankee for the Ports of Savannah and Brunswick and all other terminals and facilities due to the expectation of sustained gale force winds generated by Hurricane Irma that may arrive within 24 hours.

    These ports and facilities are currently closed to all commercial traffic and all transfer operations while Yankee remains in effect.

  • Dive Into Gray’s Reef, National Marine Sanctuary, Savannah, GA

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.


    CLICK HERE FOR Dive Into Gray's Reef!

     
     
     
     
     

     

    Volunteer to be a steward of your sanctuary!

    GRNMS Header
    Earth Is Blue Logo

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects a vibrant hard-bottom reef habitat in the Atlantic Ocean just off the Georgia Coast. This 22-square-mile protected area is teeming with numerous species of fish, such as black sea bass, groupers, and mackerels. Loggerhead sea turtles forage and rest year-round at Gray’s Reef, and the sanctuary is within the critical habitat of the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale.

    Learn more by visiting:


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    Are You Ready to Make A Deeper Dive into Gray’s Reef?

    Volunteers are integral to the success of Gray’s Reef operations. If you’d like to dive deeper into your local marine sanctuary, please consider the following opportunities to join our outstanding team of volunteers.

    Top banner photos: Greg McFall/NOAA


    Alli

    Speakers Bureau

    If you would like to share your enthusiasm about Gray’s Reef with organizations throughout the region, consider joining our speakers bureau. We will schedule the presentations and supply you with a comprehensive slide kit and the training you’ll need to get started. Our speakers are in high demand for K-12 education, recreation and general audiences. This is a great opportunity for retired professionals and recent grads looking for public speaking experience. Register your interest here. Or, if you are interested in booking a presentation for your organization, please complete our online request form.


    Survey Clipboard

    Social Science Internship

    Gray’s Reef has a number of internships available throughout the year. We are currently looking for an intern to assist us in conducting a socioeconomic survey in our local area (Jan-Mar). For more information about this project, please click here. Candidates interested in this part-time, unpaid internship can submit their cover letter and resumes here through 12/1/17 for consideration. 


    GRFF 2

    Public Events Team

    Would you like a front-row seat to the Gray’s Reef Film Festival? Want to march in Savannah’s famed St. Patrick’s Day Parade? How about a fish-eyed view of our underwater robotics competition? We need you and a few friends to help us bring the remote reef to the street through rolling art installations, creature features and education simulations. Volunteers are needed at these and other events coming up this fall, like Coastfest and Skidaway Marine Science Day. Register your interest here.


    SAC

    Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Welcome to Monique Gordon who now serves as the K-12 Education representative on the Gray’s Reef Advisory Council, and welcome back Dr. Peter Auster who serves as the Living Resources Research representative. This all-volunteer advisory group consists of individuals from various user groups, government agencies and the public-at-large and provides advice on the operation and management of the sanctuary. 

    Learn more about the Gray’s Reef Advisory Council by joining us for the next meeting on September 22, 2017 at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography library auditorium. 


    VOY Mandy Harvey

    2017 Volunteer of the Year

    Each year we recognize one outstanding volunteer as our Volunteer of the Year. Our honoree, recognized for her extraordinary efforts in 2016, is Mandy Harvey. 

    “I really enjoy volunteering at Gray’s Reef because it gives me the opportunity to use my existing skills in news ways to support an organization devoted to something I care deeply about—the health of our oceans. And, I get to have a great time doing it!” 

    Mandy’s dedication, along with that of the honorees from the other 14 marine sanctuaries and monuments, was recognized by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and National Marine Sanctuaries Foundation during Capitol Hill Ocean Week in Washington, DC this past June. 

    Congratulations and Thank you, Mandy!


    For more information please visit:

    graysreef.noaa.gov

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary                                

    10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, GA 31411                     912-598-2345

    Volunteer Inquires: jody.patterson@noaa.gov 

  • News from Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Savannah, GA

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.


    CLICK HERE FOR Savor Summer in Savannah!

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    GRNMS Header
    Earth Is Blue Logo

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects a vibrant hard-bottom reef habitat in the Atlantic Ocean just off the Georgia Coast. This 22-square-mile protected area is teeming with numerous species of fish, such as black sea bass, groupers, and mackerels. Loggerhead sea turtles forage and rest year-round at Gray’s Reef, and the sanctuary is within the critical habitat of the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale.

    Learn more by visiting GRNMS here:


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    Savor Summer in Savannah

    Summer may be winding down, but we’re just warming up! We hope you will join the staff and friends of Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary at these exciting upcoming events.

    Top banner photos: Greg McFall/NOAA


    Tybee Post Alternative

    August 1 – Gray’s Reef Tuesdays on Tybee

    The summer film series continues this Tuesdayat Tybee Post Theaterwith the inspiring, real-life story of Winter, the Dolphin That Can. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7:00 p.m.

    With our apologies for postponing Shifting Baselines, we have rescheduled the screening for August 8, 7:00 p.m. at the Tybee Post Theater. The movie tells a story of Georgia’s coast as told by her commercial fishing families, scientists, and chefs. Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation’s Founding Chair, Cathy Sakas, is the executive producer bringing this film to life.


    Get Into Your Sanctuary Day Logo

    August 12 – Get Into Your Sanctuary Day

    Experience a 360-degree virtual diveof Gray’s Reef when you visit the Islands Library branch of Live Oak Public Libraries on August 12, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Library guests can explore the sanctuary using Virtual Reality goggles and an interactive exhibit, Q&A with our staff, and take home some fun giveaways!  

    In addition, the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries is sponsoring a photo contest until August 12. We encourage you to Get Into Your Sanctuary and share the fun nationwide! 


    AFA

    September 22 – A Fishy Affair 

    Join us and the Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation for an evening of fun at this malicious, but delicious lionfish-focused Chef’s challenge featuring four talented local chefs preparing their own unique lionfish dishes. 

    A Fishy Affair attendees will enjoy over 350 pounds of Atlantic-harvested lionfish to bring awareness to the invasive species and in support of sustainable seafood in area restaurants.  A raffle, live auction, short film, and signature cocktail will be offered at the entertaining and educational evening benefitting Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. Tickets are on sale now!


    Catherine K

    Welcome Dr. Catherine Dunn Kostilnik!

    We are delighted to introduce you to Catherine Dunn Kostilnik, PhD., the new Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation Executive Director! 

    Please join us in welcoming Catherine who can be reached by emailing catherine@marinesanctuary.org.


    For more information please visit:

    graysreef.noaa.gov

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary 

    10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, GA 31411

    912-598-2345

  • Special Sneak Peek! Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Savannah, GA

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.


    CLICK HERE FOR SNEAK PREVIEW

    Exclusive Preview from GPB at Tybee Tuesday

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    At our next “Gray’s Reef Tuesday” on July 11, we have a treat from Georgia Public Broadcasting: a sneak peek of their upcoming 3-part television special called RARE—Creatures of the Photo Ark.  RARE is a project of renowned National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore. Throughout the show, scientists and naturalists reveal surprising information about the world’s rare and at-risk animals. The preview will also include footage from right here in Georgia, with video from Georgia Outdoors naturalist Sharon Collins. 

    We will be joined by special guest Emmalee Hackshaw from GBP who will introduce us to this wonderful experience, followed by our feature film Ocean Frontiers. Meet us at the Tybee Post Theater every Tuesday evening through August 1 for this salty, sea-loving film series!


  • Summer News and Events from Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Savannah, GA

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.

    CLICK HERE FOR COMING EVENTS
    GRNMS Header
    GRNMS Logo - White

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects a vibrant hard-bottom reef habitat in the Atlantic Ocean just off the Georgia Coast. This 22 square mile area is teeming with numerous species of fish, such as black sea bass, groupers, and snappers. Loggerhead sea turtles forage and rest year-round at Gray’s Reef, and the sanctuary is within the only known winter calving grounds for the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale.


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    Photos: Greg McFall, NOAA

    It’s Summertime by the Sea!

    Join us at Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary as we celebrate summer on the beautiful and bountiful Georgia coast.


    Tybee Post  

    June 27 to August 1 – Gray’s Reef Tuesdays at Tybee Post Theatre

    Our summer film series continues each Tuesday through August 1 with lots of new ocean movies! Doors open at 6:30pm and movies begin at 7:00pm


    August 12 – Get Into Your Sanctuary Day

    Experience a 360-degree virtual dive at Gray’s Reef when you visit the Islands Library during Get Into Your Sanctuary Day on August 12. You can also view our exhibit, meet members of our staff, and take home some fun giveaways! In addition, the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries is sponsoring a photo contestJuly 1 – August 12. We encourage you to take photos while out at Gray’s Reef and join the fun nationwide! 

      Get Into Your Sanctuary Day Logo

    AFA  

    September 22 – 3rd Annual A Fishy Affair 

    Join us and the Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation for an evening of fun at this malicious, but delicious lionfish-focused Chef’s challenge featuring four talented local chefs preparing their own unique lionfish dishes. 


    Gray’s Reef Research Cruise

    The 2017 Gray’s Reef research cruise aboard the NOAA ship Nancy Foster culminated with a well-attended open house while she was docked along River Street in Savannah. Read all about the exciting research projects that were conducted during the cruise on the “ships log” blog and take a peek at life on board in this video segment from our friends at WSAV.

      nancy foster at river street

    For more information please visit

    graysreef.noaa.gov

  • Live Exploration of Gray’s Reef, May 10, 2017, 10:00 a.m. EDT

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.

    LIVE EXPLORATION OF GRAY'S REEF

    Diver at Gray’s Reef

    LIVE EXPLORATION OF GRAY’S REEF

    MAY 10, 2017, 10:00 a.m. EDT

    We are partnering with Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) for a “Live Exploration” that will unfold the wonders of ​the sanctuary in a​n extraordinary​ livestreaming event targeted toward elementary and middle school students. Working with experts from G​PB’s education division and the University of Georgia, Gray’s Reef’s Superintendent Sarah Fangman will take students on a virtual dive so they can explore the reef without ​getting wet! The virtual expedition will include underwater surgery on a fish to insert a tagging transmitter and beautiful views of the vibrant and abundant marine life found at Gray’s Reef. Students will learn how Gray’s Reef was formed, how the seafloor serves as a habitat and how they can help protect the reef from major threats.

    Register now: GPB Live Exploration: Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary

    ​The Live Exploration will be available on demand after May 10 ​with supplemental classroom resources for grades K-12. Please tell your friends and coworkers about this opportunity; teachers all over America are welcome to participate!

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary

    graysreef.noaa.gov

    phone: 912-598-2345
    email: graysreef@noaa.gov
    10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, GA 31411

  • News and Events from Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Savannah, GA

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary protects Georgia’s special live-bottom wildlife habitat in the Atlantic Ocean and along the southeastern U.S. coast, an area teeming with diversity and an abundance of marine life.

    Read More!

    MATE ROV Competition Southeast Region – Port Cities of the Future
    Hosted by Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary and Georgia Southern University STEM Institute
    Saturday, April 22, 2017

    MATE underwater robotics competitions challenge students from K-12 schools, community colleges and universities all over the world to design and build ROVs to tackle realistic missions, which are modeled after actual scenarios from ocean exploration and maritime industry services.

    Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and robotics competitions provide a vehicle to apply science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education concepts; prepare students for secondary education and careers; and offer educators training and expertise in applied technologies.

    During the 2017 MATE ROV competition, Port Cities of the Future, student teams will compete for overall highest points in a mission to maintain operations supporting the commerce, entertainment, health and safety of a thriving port. At least one winning RANGER-class ROV team from this southeast regional competition will move up to the MATE International Competition, held June 2017 in Long Beach, CA.

    ROV teams – registration is open!

    Join us on Earth Day, April 22 and watch all of the aquatic excitement! (It’s FREE)

    Chatham County Aquatic Center

    7240 Sallie Mood Drive Savannah, GA 31404

    9a.m. – 4p.m.


    Learn more about it.

    Upcoming Events

    Engage with Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary at these public events:

    Sanctuary Advisory Council Meeting – February 28, 2017
    Savannah Boat Show – March 3-5, 2017
    Savannah St. Patrick’s Day Parade – March 17, 2017
    Click here to Volunteer for any of these Gray’s Reef events.

    phone 912-598-2345
    email graysreef@noaa.gov
    10 Ocean Science Circle Savannah, GA 31411

    Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary

    Stay Connected with NOAA’s National Ocean Service

  • Poor Paint Job from Hinckley Boat Yard, Thunderbolt, GA, AICW Statute Mile 583

    We post this complaint only to compare the experience of this skipper with Imron versus Awlgrip. We also trust that the results of this particular work are not typical of Hinkley’s expertise. See Tom Law’s comments below.

    You don’t always get what you pay for! With such great reviews we decided to use Hinckley to paint our boat. We got a bid to have our 49 Hylas yacht painted in Awlgrip in January 2016. We have used Awlgrip paint before and found it to be durable, easy to clean and long lasting. Read More

    A few weeks after we got the bid to paint the topsides in Awlgrip by the manager, we were handed off to [another worker] to coordinate the work we needed done. Then came emails and phone calls to use Imron paint. Imron paint is cheaper than Awlgrip. Although we loved Awlgrip we decided the “professionals” knew better and so we went with their product Imron. We felt that on every step Hinkley encouraged us to do more and more work than we felt unnecessary. It always started with “at Hinckley we do it this way because it’s the best”. They faired the transom and built it up with a compound to fix a few dings. We were not in Florida when the work was done which was Big mistake. When we arrived in late January the first issues started. First issue was we had covered our boat to protect the deck from the harsh Florida weather .We always do this when leaving our boat in storage. Hinckley removed it when they stepped the mast right after we left and never replaced as they deemed it unnecessary. We reminded them to put it back on after the mast was stepped and were assured they would do so. We had new [name] signs put on the boat. When I showed [the worker] that they were peeling, he suggested a little clear nail polish on the edges to keep them from peeling off! I was starting to regret using Hinckley.
    Most worrisome was the paint job. The Imron just wasn’t the right type of paint for a sailboat that actually gets used. This became apparent a few months later. We sailed from Hinckley directly to the Bahamas and Cuba for 4 months. The boat was only in a marina once where it was rinsed down and washed. It was there we noticed that salt had etched the paint. When we returned to Hinckley five months after the initial painting we had to haul the boat and they had to use an acid to remove the salt. Even the yard and paint distributor said they had never seen anything like it. Never in 25,000 miles of sailing with Awlgrip had we ever used anything but Awlgrip wash to clean our boat of salt residue. It always looked great. Next issue was discovered by the guys who polished the boa. He t noticed small cracks all over the transom. Brian tried to explain it as fiberglass from under the bonding they used was suddenly erupting through the paint. Riduculous? Of course. But our choice was to stay in Florida and haggle with Hinckley or just consider this a VERY EXPENSIVE lesson. We realized we would never be satisfied and left. We are currently in Europe and have now noticed that everything scratches this paint. Mooring lines that rub remove the paint down to the primer. Bumpers rubbing wear off the paint, a small bump on a plastic dock scratches. Even my finger nail can scratch through the paint! Two professional painters here in Europe laughed at their explanation on why the transom had cracks. Both explained it was too much compound used and the compound was cracking underneath. This of course makes more sense. I will say that Hinckley did reimburse me the costs of the signs. Lessons learned. Never would I recommend Imron paint and never would I recommend Hinckley Boat yard.
    Maureen Gapp
  • Captain Jim Healy Discusses the Waterway from Charleston to St. Augustine

    Longtime cruiser and SSECN Contributing Editor, Captain Jim Healy, shares his knowledge and experience in these observations on this portion of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Thank you Jim!

    The entire region from Charleston to St. Augustine has high tidal ranges, ranging from 5′ at St. Augustine to as much as 9′ in Savannah/Beaufort/Charleston.  Those high tidal ranges create swift tidal currents, and especially for first-times, docking is easiest in the 1/2 hour before and after slack.
    There are many areas of shallow water in the region.  The very best resource for current data on low water and caution areas is available via www.activecaptain.com.  Two other  websites that all ICW travelers should know about are www.waterwayguide.com and www.cruisersnet.net.  I’m sure you are familiar with the Waterway Guide book series.  The “Salty Southeast Cruiser’s Net” (SSECN) is  really a boating group.  It was founded by Claiborne Young.  After Claiborne’s untimely loss, the group continued in operation.  The Cruiser’s Net website specializes on the US Southeast.  There is some duplication of material between the WWG site and the SSECN site, but there is unique value to both.  Both are excellent resources for fuel prices, marinas and anchorages.  These websites would make a good sidebar for any ICW article.  Two of these websites require registration – SSECN does not – and all three are free, and all are very useful to ICW boaters.  Both WWG and SSECN also have smart phone apps that duplicate and augment website information and are very useful on small-format devices.
    There are some generalizations that apply to the region, including the stretch from Georgetown, SC all the way south to below Fernandina Beach.  In some of those areas, boats drawing more than 4′ will want to consider not traveling at low tide; especially celestial low tides.  The Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for dredging the ICW.  USACE is funded by state congressional delegations.  In recent years, the money congress allocates to dredging has been diverted to “more pressing needs,” and so many areas of the ICW are shoaling, and in fact, the ICW resource is slowly being lost; well, allowed to die, really, by congress.  There is a not-for-profit called the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association.  The Executive Director is Brad Pickel; bpickel@seahavenconsulting.com.  That would make another sidebar for any article on the ICW.  There are some local knowledge bypasses around some shoal areas.  All of the cruising sites above can provide additional detail.
    Renting a car in any of these venues greatly expands what a boating visitor can see and do.  Some, but not all, marinas have courtesy cars.  Generally they can’t be used for long periods, but they are useful for re-provisioning when needed.
    Hope this helps.
    Jim
    Peg and Jim Healy aboard Sanctuary, currently at Ft. Myers, FL
  • Captain Jim Healy on Charleston and Beaufort, SC and Savannah, GA

    Contributing Editor, Captain Jim Healy, shares his perspective on Charleston and Beaufort, SC and Savannah, GA where several SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSORs are located. Thank you Jim!

    Charleston_city_marina_130x130_2

    Charleston, SC and Savannah, GA: magnificent old southern cities with many points-of-charleston-harborinterest and fine restaurants; our strategy is to take a tour bus around the city.  Look for a tour company that has same-day on-and-off privileges.  (We do this every time we arrive somewhere we’ve not been before, including Canada).  We take the entire tour circuit first, then go back to places that we think we’d like to know more about.  At Charleston, start at the Welcome Center.  Or, take the tour boat to Fort Sumter; nice stjohnsaquarium near the Ft. Sumter ferry docks.  In Charleston, there is a water taxi from the Charleston Maritime Center that goes back and forth to Patriot Point, which is savanahhyattdockswhere the USS Yorktown is located.  In Savannah, there is a nice stage theater within walking distance of the downtown waterfront (http://www.savannahtheatre.com).  The Savannah waterfront is very interesting, with a large riverwalk, wonderful park overlooking the River, and large shipping and commercial traffic as well as every kind of small-isleofhopeboat and pleasure craft.  There are several architecture tours in both cities, and both have lots of weekly and seasonal activity for visitors.  From Savannah (there are marina options in downtown Savannah on the Savannah River or at Thunderbolt and Isle of Hope), boaters can also visit Tybee Island (light house and Fort Pulaski).

    beaufort-sc-marina

    Beaufort, SC: from the Beaufort Downtown Marina, take a carriage tour through the historic ante-bellum homes in the area.  The downtown is friendly with many shoppes and good restaurant options.

    Jim Healy

  • Report on Visiting Downtown Savannah, GA, Savannah River, off the AICW


    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch. If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!
    A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, the Savannah Hyatt Hotel is in the very center of activity on the Savannah waterfront, as affirmed by Cap’n Parky. River Street Market Place Dock is a few steps farther downstream on the Waterfront.

    Here’s the up to date situation (Nov 2015) of visiting Savannah, some 6 miles or so up river from the ICW. Firstly the downtown public dock is now closed to boats of any size – I have no idea why. [See Mike Ahart’s comment below] The Market Landing marina [River Street Market Place Dock] is $3 per ft per night but the best deal is at the Hyatt Marina. $2.75 per ft transient [see Dockmaster’s comment below] but you get all the hotel’s excellent facilities – solid floating dock, 30/50amp power, impeccably clean restrooms, showers, exercise room, indoor swimming pool (with free towels), coffee shop and excellent (though pricey) restaurant. Next door on Rivers Street, try the roof top bar and grill of the Bohemian Hotel for a great sunset view of the Savannah River. Well worth a visit – Five Star Rating
    Cap’n Parky

    Click Here To View the Eastern Florida Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Savannah Hyatt

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah Hyatt

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Waterfront

  • Six Atlantic Coast Sites Scheduled for NOAA Surveys in 2015

    Of the six Atlantic coast survey sites, the Charleston and Savannah surveys will obviously be of special interest to SSECN!

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    NOAA targets busy coastal areas for hydro surveys
    NOAA survey ships are scheduled to survey nearly 1,800 square nautical miles in the U.S. coastal waters of the lower 48 states this year, collecting data that will update nautical charts for navigation and other uses.
    The Office of Coast Survey will manage the surveys that measure water depths and collect ocean floor data for charting, identifying navigational hazards, informing wind farm decisions, mapping fish habitats, and assisting with coastal resilience. Check the useful story map, 2015 Hydrographic Survey Projects, for the survey outlines and more information. We will update the map as weather and operational constraints dictate.

    Briefly, this year’s 13 NOAA hydrographic survey projects are:
    Gulf of Maine, where chart soundings in heavily trafficked and fished areas are decades old and need updating for navigational safety
    Buzzards Bay (Massachusetts and Rhode Island), where increased use of deeper-draft double-hull barges – and possible installation of marine transmission cable routes and wind energy development — requires updated soundings
    Rhode Island Sound, where the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has identified a wind energy lease area
    Approaches to Chesapeake (North Carolina), where charts of critical navigational areas need updating for navigation and to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management manage windfarm activity
    Approaches to Charleston (South Carolina), where updated soundings will provide the correct under-keel clearance information for the expected transit of larger and deeper-draft ships
    Approaches to Savannah (Georgia), where the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project will increase the authorized depth of the harbor from 42 to 47 feet and updated soundings will provide the correct under-keel clearance information for the expected transit of larger and deeper-draft ships
    Chatham Strait (Alaska), where charts need to be updated for cruise liners, ferries, Coast Guard cutters, Navy vessels, tugs, and barges that use this waterway on a regular basis or when avoiding storms in the Gulf of Alaska
    Approaches to Kotzebue (Alaska), where deep-draft vessels have their cargo lightered to shore by shallow draft barges
    Point Hope (Alaska), where shipping traffic is increasing due to receding ice but charted soundings are sparse and date back to the 1960s
    West Prince of Wales Island (Alaska), where updated charts are needed by smaller vessels that use Televak Narrows as an alternate passage during foul weather
    Shumagin Islands (Alaska), where Coast Survey needs data to create a new, larger scale, nautical chart
    Port Clarence (Alaska), where Coast Survey needs data to create a new, larger scale, nautical chart
    South Arctic Reconnaissance Route, where trackline data will assist consideration of the U.S. Coast Guard’s proposed Bering Strait Port Access Route Study
    North Coast of Kodiak Island, where we need to update charts for Kodiak’s large fishing fleet and increasing levels of passenger vessel traffic.

  • Advice on Jekyll Creek, AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 683


    We are receiving regular reports of shallow water and groundings in Jekyll Creek, a perennial trouble spot. SSECN recommends extra care and mid to high tide only for this passage. See Navigation Alert   from October.  Markers 19 and 20A are on the north side of the Hwy 520 fixed bridge. Ours thanks to Skipper Reeves who keeps us posted on all things Jekyll! Jekyll Creek is home to Jekyll Harbor Marina, A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    First pic G19 is circled and sailboat is heading South. Second pic Sailboat is clear of 19 by staying 40 ft of marker. The channel is very narrow and the sand/mud bar is moving East into channel.
    Hope this helps as many are swinging wide and running aground. Hug the East bank & line up on next marker.
    Call the marina for local knowledge or Boat US
    Seeya,
    Sonny Reeves
    The Office

    Green 19

    Green 19

     

    Sailboat at Green 19

    Sailboat at Green 19

    And then, there is this strange advice from a tow boat captain:

    While in Jekyll Creek in July this year with our 6′ draft sailboat, I called Boat US to ask about areas to watch for. I thought they were supposed to be a resource. The guy who I spoke with told me that I shouldn’t worry, he takes 6′ draft boats all up and down that stretch of the ICW and I should just stay in the middle of the channel. When I told him that sometimes the middle of the channel isn’t always obvious, he said that I should travel at low tide so as to be able to see it! Counter intuitive for a sailboat!
    Joni Goodman

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Jekyll Harbor Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Jekyll Harbor Marina

  • A Tour of the Area around ICW/Savannah River Junction, AICW Statute Mile 575

    Captain Jim Healy

    Captain Jim Healy

    Most of our postings dealing with Savannah speak of cruising west from the Waterway, up the Savannah to downtown Savannah, certainly a delightful sidetrip. SSECN Contributing Editor, Captain Jim Healy, gives an account of the areas around the Savannah River/ICW junction, including Thunderbolt and Tybee Island. Thank you Jim – definitely a good read!

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    Sail Harbor Marina is on Wilmington Island, GA. Their website is: www.sailharbormarina.com/

    Enjoyed reading this post by Capt. Jim. We always enjoy visiting Savannah by boat. Bought our last boat @ Sail Harbor and had the yard haul and do some work after the survey. The bottom Job is still good now nearly 3 years later. Exceptional service and came in under estimate which is always good. Highly recommend their staff for repairs and service.
    Sonny

  • Ice Cream Shop Recommendation in Savannah, GA, Savannah River off the AICW

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    Savannah Waterfront – Click for Chartview

    Ice cream is often the most sought after commodity whenever going ashore, regardless the time of day. When in Savannah, enjoy the recommendation offered by Skipper Susan Landry, co-owner of Beach House Publications, publishers of “The Great Book of Anchorages,” (http://www.tgboa.com)

    It is well worth the trip up the Savannah River to sample Leopold’s Ice Cream. They have been in business for almost 100 years and all of the ice cream is made on the premises from their own secret recipes. A short walk down Abercorn to Broughton Street from the waterfront will have you there in no time. This place is a feast for the eyes and ears as well with 10 cent jukebox and original décor.
    Susan Landry

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Waterfront

  • Good Words for River Street Market Place Dock, Savannah River, Savannah, GA

    Savannah Waterfront - Click for Chartview

    Here are good words for River Street Market Place Dock as originally posted on Trawler Forum, http://www.trawlerforum.com/. River Street Market Place Dock is located on the Savannah River in downtown Savannah.

    If you want to be downtown, the River Street waterfront is best. Just fender up, put away, lockup and enjoy. You will not lack for activity both on the water and in town.
    Don on “Moonstruck”

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Waterfront

  • The Case For Cruising Upstream on Savannah River to Savannah, GA

    The Hyatt dock is a popular boating dock along the Savannah River that many tourists and boaters use if they are staying at The Hyatt or just stopping by River Street for some lunch.  If you’re sailing along Tybee Island, park your boat and grab a burger!Whenever I get together with a group of cruisers interested in exploring Georgia’s coastal waters, the topic always seems to arise about whether it’s better to berth at one of the several transient friendly marinas in Thunderbolt, GA, and then take a taxi into the Savannah Historic District, or cruise upstream to Savannah, and spend some time at SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, Savannah Hyatt Docks, or one of the other downtown Savannah facilities. A part of these discussions the possibility is almost always raised at to whether your vessel will be jostled by the wake of a passing freighter or other ocean going vessel. Happily, Captain Tom reports below that he did not encounter any such problems during his visit.

    For years, I have read how rough the wakes are on the Savannah River, right downtown; but pleaded with myself to give it a personal try. It was actually fine. The big freighters which pass on average once an hour do not kick up the water that much, the tugs and ferries some more but still not uncomfortable. The only major wake maker was a Coast Guard vessel making a non-emergency run so fast that he was sending water over the top of his boat too.
    Savannah has so much to offer in history and culinary delight. Patsy and I have not had so much excellent Southern cooking in our memory, even the grits were always done properly. A history buff could stay on the River forever and still learn new things.
    Then, there is the River itself. TV could not hold a candle to the entertainment of seeing the River activity with so many boats coming and going or people just walking the river side.
    The dockage rates are high but well worth the experience. Include Savannah in your cruising plans.
    Stay safe,
    Tom

    We are on the Savannah River docks right now. We always stop here going N and S. Take the visitors center elevator to town level and walk up Bull St. You see all the best squares of the town. It is not too bad wake wise. Huge container ships come and go all night. Last night though I awoke to a very loud blast that in my sleep sounded like my alarm clock. It was a freighters horn which lasted over a minute right outside the boat.
    At least on this stop the trumpet player looking for tips, who repeated “the Saints ” incessantly and badly played, was missing. It’s all part of the experience.
    Greg Han

    I, too recommend a trip up the river to Savannah. Most of the time you are fine, but the occasional heavy wake does mean you should take some extra care tieing up and put out your biggest fenders. You are right in the middle of Savannah, so it is great for enjoying the restaurants, strolling, and the night life. It is one of the most walkable cities on the ICW, though there is no large grocery store nearby–enjoy the many great eateries. One night I heard a loud saxophone playing and stuck my head out of the hatch to find out we were the scenic backdrop for a live musician performing before a large crowd.
    John Kettlewell

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah Hyatt Docks

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Westin Savannah Harbor

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the River Street Market Place Dock

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Savannah City Recreational Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Savannah Hyatt Docks and the Downtown Savannah Waterfront

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