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Archive For: ICW – Channel Through Cumberland Dividings

  • Good Depths found in Cumberland Dividings, AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    Cumberland Dividings has been a Problem Stretch for several years due to constantly shifting shoals and boaters’ ill-advised adherence to the erroneous magenta line in this area. Captain Poovey brings us good news and good advice.

    Passed through here this morning (10/10/13) from the North at 11:15 AM (3.5 hrs past low tide). I steered a course to within 25 feet of Green markers “59A”, “62″, and “63A” and saw nothing less than 21 feet.
    The rule here should be “stay away from the Red side!”
    Bob Poovey m/v Threadbare

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Chartlet Below To Open A Chart View Windows Zoomed to the Location of This AICW Problem Stretch”

  • Advice for Navigating AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch and Brickhill River, Statute Miles 696-704

    Cumberland Dividings - Click for Chartview

    The Brickhill makes a pleasant, parallel detour east of the Waterway, with a north departure at Waterway marker #40 and rejoining the Waterway at Cumberland Dividings, markers #62 and #63. Captain Conrad’s advice on entering the Brickhill refers to the southern entrance. Cumberland Dividings has been a Problem Stretch for several years due to constantly shifting shoals and an erroneous magenta line on many chartplotters.

    Claiborne,
    After watching a sailboat go hard aground yesterday and laying on its side most of the afternoon, I would like to offer an alert for the AICW mile marker 703 near Cumberland Island and its intersection with Brickhill River. When northbound, stay well to the eastern, outside edge of the marked channel including going between a charted marshland and G59A. That is well off the magenta line but it is deep water, a minimum of 11 feet. It is also a major safety issue to go through these waters at a mid to rising high tide. If going into Brickhill River, stay on the northern edge of the junction as yesterday’s sailboat found bottom only a few feet from where we found 10+ water depth.
    Stay safe,
    Tom Conrad
    Nordic Tug 42 True North
    Currently in Brunswick, Georgia

    Very good advice Capt Tom. You can also call Boat US and they will give you local knowledge as you travel about a specific location problem or best practice for the current conditions. We cruise that area and shoaling can be a problem.
    Seeya,
    Sonny Reeves

    We just came thru here and took the Brickhill all the way thru after docking at the Plum Orchard pier for a couple of hours, and agree with this posting. Go slow and your depth finder will tell you which way to go. The Brickhill was easy all the way using normal navigation techniques (chart watching and outside of curves)
    John Winter

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Chartplotter and Charting Issues at Cumberland Dividings AICW Problem Stretch, (Statute Mile 704)

    Cumberland Dividings - Click for Chartview

    Cumberland Dividings, just north of where the AICW intersects the southerly reaches of the Brickhill River, has multiple problems. First, some charts and chartplotters show the magenta fairway line running on the western side of the red markers in this area. Those who blindly follow this erroneous magenta line will run aground every time. Also, and perhaps even worse, the Waterway is shoaling badly along its western flank, north of marker #63.

    AICW MM704 Cumberland Dividings Problem
    We transited this area northbound this afternoon. I was watching a Garmin chartplotter (new 2011) and the newest NOAA raster chart displaying on a laptop at the lower steering station sent to my Nexus via a VPN connection. Even the newest NOAA raster chart shows the magenta line to the west of the red daymarks (the real channel is to the east side of the daymarks). The daymarks are properly marked with the ICW triangle. A sailboat following us failed to honor the red daymarks – fortunately they stayed very close to the red (even though they were was leaving them on his starboard side) and made it through. The most current NOAA ENC chart has the correct course passing over dry land based on our track.
    This same problem has existed since at least 2005 or so. How long does it take NOAA to correct a chart?

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report from Cumberland Dividings AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    Captain Butler offers good advice for the Waterway channel near the southern tip of the “Cumberland Dividings,” just north of where the AICW intersects the southerly reaches of the Brickhill River. This “AICW Problem Stretch” has multiple problems. First, some charts and chartplotters show the magenta fairway line running on the western side of the red markers in this area. Those who blindly follow this erroneous magenta line will run aground every time. Also, and perhaps even worse, the Waterway is shoaling badly along its western flank, north of marker #63.

    Channel is well marked, looks like new markers were installed. Definitely follow the markers and not the magenta line on the charts.
    Karen Butler

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Chartlet Below To Open A Chart View Windows Zoomed to the Location of This AICW Problem Stretch”

  • FORGET THE CHARTS! AICW and Brickhill River (South) Anchorage Breadcrumbs (St. M. 704) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

    On the Water GuidebooksSalty Southeast Cruisers’ Net strategic partners, Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, owners and founder of On The Water ChartGuides (http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com) share another fascinating excerpt from their very soon to be released two volume AICW Anchorage Guide series.
    Before going any further, PLEASE NOTE THAT THE DOYLES ARE OFFERING A PRE-RELEASE 42% DISCOUNT ON THEIR NEW ANCHORAGE GUIDES. THAT SPECIAL OFFER ENDS TOMORROW, 8/10/12. ALL INTERESTED CRUISERS SHOULD FOLLOW THE LINK ABOVE WITHOUT DELAY!
    Back to the article below – Diana and Mark take a good look at the anchorage found on southern Brickhill River, hard by the Cumberland Island National National Park.
    The “dynamic duo” also bring to light some critical info on the Cumberland Narrows “AICW Problem Stretch” (see http://www.CruisersNet.net/aicw-channel-through-cumberland-dividings). Note the AICW soundings on the included excerpt page from their Anchorage Guide below, and how these show the good depths lie on the EAST side of the markers at the intersection of the Waterway and southern Brickhill River, far from the magenta line!

    Hi Claiborne,
    We all accept that paper and electronic charts are notoriously inaccurate. All too often, charted navaid positions and the ICW’s Magenta Line do not correspond at all to the real world.
    Just look at how the ICW is charted to the WEST of the red navaids off Brickhill River’s southern entrance. Ouch!
    Cruisers hear that Brickhill River is “mis-charted” and has a “really shallow entrance” … but, “once inside, has excellent depths.”
    What does that really mean? Do you just “feel your way in” and hope for the best? That might turn out to be a disaster and is almost certainly not worth the stress. So you pass on the anchorage and move on.
    But wait! Brickhill River is a real gem of an anchorage, particularly for active boaters who enjoy hiking in national parks.
    Thus Brickhill River (South) anchorage turns out to be one of the better examples of the value of our new AnchorGuides with their digital breadcrumb tracks.
    Look at the depth-annotated survey track on the page [below]. You can see the entrance surveyed as low as 10 feet (at 7.0 feet above MLLW) along the southern shore. The northern shore had much more water, with depths consistently in the teens. Now the “shallow entrance” anecdotal report can be confirmed and visualized as an extension of shoaling from the southern bank, with a natural channel running along the northern bank.
    And now you can see the true ICW path, EAST of the red navaids, right over the non-existent “mis-charted” shoal and island!
    Once you’re safely in Brickhill River, you’ll enjoy a beautiful anchorage with all-around protection off Cumberland Island National Park. Cumberland Island is one of the largest undeveloped barrier islands along the Atlantic coast, home to a national seashore and one of the largest maritime forests in the U.S.
    You can access the national park at a small park dock or adjacent tiny beach, both for a nominal day-use fee. Nearby shore amenities include picnic tables, trails, and restrooms.
    For a hi-res detailed map of the island, visit http://1.usa.gov/NZMHsW
    Brickhill River (South) anchorage is located just off “Plum Orchard” on the map.
    Best and see you On the Water,
    Captains Mark & Diana Doyle
    http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Brickhill River Southern Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Brickhill River Southern Anchorage

  • Update on Pascal’s Report on AICW Problem Stretch Channel Through Cumberland Dividings (Statute Mile 704)

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway. Shoaling and mischarting of the magenta fairway line reder this section of the AICW a REAL problem. Be sure to follow the link below to these water’s listing in our “AICW Problem Stretches Directory” to learn more!

    While some tide is nice, I no longer bother passing thru here at high tide as there is plenty of water on the green side. northbound, favor the greens south of the bend then keep going almost as if you’re going into that creek on the NE side. Stay close to the shore line in the turn then come back towards the center after G59A north of the turn. Well over 15′ MLW all the way. No reason to run aground here!
    Pascal aboard MY Charmer, 70′ 6+ draft

    Came through here today (June 12, 2012) at 11:30 AM which was 1.5 hrs past low tide.
    Follow Pascal”s instructions and you will find plenty off water. Lowest reading we observed was 11.4 ft. using his directions.
    Bob Poovey

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report from AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    This AICW troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway. Our recommendation remains to take this passage at mid to high tide.

    Cumberland Dividings mile 704, had plenty of water-saw nothing less than 18′, when we went through around 1520; LT at Cumberland Wharf at 1230, +00.4′.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report on AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway.The report and advice offered below come from our good friend, Chuck Baier, an experienced and skillful cruiser, is the former General Manager of Waterway Guide, and now authors an informative newsletter for our good friends at MarinaLife.

    This is another example of how easy it is to get into trouble following a plotter and not paying close attention to where you are. At the section of the ICW known as Cumberland Dividings at Statute Mile 704, just near where the southern end of the Brickhill River meets the ICW behind Cumberland Island, following the magenta line on the plotter will put you hard aground. BUT, if you follow the channel markers, you will be fine. The channel is very shallow on the red side, especially between red markers 60 and 62. Stay waayyy over on the east side and when your plotter shows you going over land, I believe it shows a small island that is not there, you are actually in the deeper water. Electronics are wonderful, but don’t take the place of observing proper markers and using good common sense. Following electronics blindly can result in inconveniences at least, and expensive repairs at the worst. Some Skippers have found this to be a very expensive mistake, so keep alert and follow the marked channel. Dredging has been ongoing along parts of this stretch.
    Chuck Baier

    I agree with Chuck Baier’s comments of 04/03/12. I have passed through her twice in the last 3 weeks on a 185′ passenger vessel following Chucks advice above. No difficulties folowing the marks, but I did make both passages at greater than 1/2 tide.
    Capt. Mike

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • More on Markers in Cumberland Dividings, AICW Statute Mile 704

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway, and Pascal’s report confirms earlier September reports of good depths here. Capt. McGuire addresses another of the problems in this stretch: the magenta line at red markers #60 and #60A is charted on the west side of the red markers rather than on the east side where one would expect it to be. Jim wisely reminds us to ignore the magenta line at those markers and pass them on the east side, i.e on your starboard when southbound and on your port when northbound.

    MM704, Cumberland Dividings, all Markers have finally been moved and are marking the shoal on the red side. 12 to 15MLW throughout.
    Capt. Pascal Gardemer

    “Cumberland Island passage south. MM Marker 704-ish –Following the ‘recommended’ magenta line/route on the AICW south bound at buoys/daymarkers after 58A needs VERY SPECIAL ATTENTION!
    Markers FL R 60, Q R 60 and FL R 62Aand R 62 MUST be left to STARBOARD ! Yes I know that makes perfect sense but when you look at the chart, the ‘recommended’ path follows the magenta line passes on the wrong side. It also passes into what looks like deep water –that is WRONG. Follow your “eyes”the correct rounding of all the buoys is Red to Starboard, the chart will show this is running right across the shallows and the marsh –trust your eyes, the buoys and your depth sounder and you will not dig clams.
    Jim McGuire

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Another Grounding in Cumberland Dividings/Brickhill River Intersection, AICW Statute Mile 704)

    Cumberland Dividings has long been an “AICW Problem Stretch.” This portion of the Waterway lies between Brickhill River and Crooked River.

    Another southbound cruiser has gone aground at the infamous AICW/Brickhill River Intersection (M.704). And, Fl R 4s 12FT 3M “60″ is missing again.
    Use caution at this mark. Southbound: after G”59″ stay on the green side and swing wide towards “60A” to avoid the shoal where “60″ should be. DO NOT FOLLOW the magenta line and ignore the charts that show you on dry land. When all the day marks are in place it really isn’t hard to navigate.
    Pete Peterson

    It is important here to not look at your charts or chartplotter for clear guidance. Look to the marks themselves for a clear path and favor the green side if your draft 5 foot or more deep.
    My friend grounded just north of this spot where the Brickhill bends back to the south and the chart shows a depth in the bend of 33 feet. The bar extends northward into the inside of this bend further than the chart shows. Stay to the north side of this bend especially at low tide.
    David Burnham

    Click Here To View A Recent Article on the Cumberland Dividings Stretch of the AICW

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To The AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch

  • More Groundings on the AICW’s Run Through The Cumberland Dividings (Statute Mile 704)

    Almost a year ago, Cruisers’ Net designated the Georgia section of the Waterway known as the “Cumberland Dividings,” as an “AICW Problem Stretch.” It is so gratifying to have our advice not only confirmed but heeded by an alert skipper. And thank you, Capt. Shires, for your warning about being glued to the magenta line, either electronic or paper!

    January 15, 2011 about mid-tide rising we came through Cumberland Dividings with a 4ft draft, two power boats in front of us had gone aground (with 4.5′ and 3.5′ draft) and a sailboat in front of us (5′ draft went middle of the red and green and lost water, also could not cross over to the green side as he encountered a shoal in the middle. He had to backtrack out and follow us through. We followed the advice on this site and hugged the eastern shore very close to the green markers and the bank and had no problem (we did go right over the charted but non-existant “island” mentioned here). We did not observe the Red marker “1A”, nor did the sailboat coming behind us see it. We saw no additional floating markers anywhere. Anyone following the chart plotter and trying to avoid hitting the invisible island will end up with no water! Thanks for the great advice!
    Capt Ed Shires
    aboard IIDolphins

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To An “Alert Position” in the AICW/Cumberland Dividings

  • Report of Good AICW Depths in Cumberland Dividings (Statute Mile 704)

    Captains Bob and Helen continue their detailed reports from their southward voyage through Georgia.
    Note that the so-called Cumberland Dividings portion of the AICW lies south of Jekyll Island and St. Andrew Sound. These waters are one of our perennial “AICW Problem Stretches.” And, while Captains Bob and Helen had no problems, note that their passage was taken one hour after high tide!!!! And, these waters have an (approximately) 8 foot tidal range, so you must subtract at least 7 feet from the readings below to discover what depths would be encountered at MLW! Even with these calculation, clearly Captains Bob and Helen found a track with plenty of water, even at MLW. Others have not been so lucky, so we suggest you click the link below to our “AICW Problem Stretch Directory” listing for these waters!

    Larry, after a great run through Jekyll Creek we figured we had time to do the Cumberland Dividings with a High Tide at 1500 (Same as Jekyll Creek). Entered Cumberland Dividings at 1 hour after high tide. Draft 5 ft
    G57=24 ft
    G57A =13ft
    G59= 16ft
    R60 = 16ft
    R62= 23ft (at 1625)
    G65 = 17.3 ft
    Exit 1630 Good Run. Good Water. With good water we did go to the Green near R60 and R62 from previous reports but did not have to go that far as we had good water. If folks play the tides there would not be such negative reports.
    Captains Bob and Helen

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For Cumberland Dividings

  • Advice on AICW Passage through Cumberland Dividings (Statute Mile 704)

    Retriever, like many other cruisers, advises passage within 2 hours of high tide, preferably a rising tide, while cruising through this “AICW Problem Stretch.” The crew of “Retriever” also cautions against staying glued to the magenta line of your chartplotter. Look at the markers!

    Passed through the Cumberland Dividings about 2 hours before MHW. Look at the markers – not your chartplotter, it’ll take you into the marshes and shoals to the east. The only “issue” was at the sharp right turn at the bottom of the Dividings (all the reds are clustered together). Retriever saw 6′ – so would not of wanted to traverse that stretch at low tide considering those South GA tidal variations…
    Retriever

    And, from Captain Pascal regarding this same AICW Problem Stretch:

    I’ve always timed passage just past high tide since i usually stop before Little Mud River and timed that entire section around the tides (70MY, 6+ draft)
    So far I’ve always found only 7 to 8′ MLW thru Cumberland Dividing but this year (Oct 30th) I went much further to the green side than before and never saw less than 12′ or so.
    The key after G59A, southbound, is to stay on the green side, and aim for that ghost round island seen on the chart across from R60. at that spot, you will have 13′ MLW
    Pascal

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For Cumberland Dividings

  • Report of a Good Passage through Cumberland Dividings (AICW Statute Mile 704)

    The Channel through Cumberland Dividings has been a Georgia Problem Area for some time. Click on the links below for a Chart View of the area and further comments from fellow boaters.

    Submitted on 2010/07/15 at 8:57am
    We came through Cumberland Dividings yesterday at a mid-high tide and never saw less that 12′.
    Captain Susan Parker

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For Cumberland Dividings

  • Another Grounding On “Cumberland Dividings”/AICW – Southern Brickhill River Intersection (St. M. 704)

    The mischarted stretch of the Georgia AICW at the southern foot of the “Cumberland Dividings,” hard by the AICW/southern Brickhill River intersection, is fast becoming a true AICW problem stretch! I intend to add it to the Net’s “ICW Problems” section shortly. In the meantime, please exercise maximum caution when cruising these waters!

    Subject: ICW/ Crooked River
    Cruising News: Previous suggestions to stay way left (southbound) from G59 to the “island that isn’t there is valid. I transited about 1+45 before low tide and found depths of 15 to 25 feet until we reached the island and then it started to fall off to 15 feet. We then slowly turned to G63 with good depths. We would not hesitate to go thru here at low tide so long as we followed the channel “uncomfortably close” to the green shore between 59 and the “island”. We ended up at less than 20 yards off by the time we got to the island.
    David Jenkins

    Subject: Follow up to previous
    Cruising News: Cumberland Dividings/Crooked River area:
    At G57 – 12.1′
    At G57A – 11.9′
    Between G57A and G59 – 8.2′ (I proceeded directly from close abeam G57A to close abeam G59) Reading time was 2 hours prior to dead low, so subtract about 2 feet.
    Again, whoever found and reported the best way to go through here is to be thanked big time.
    Good Cruising.
    Capt Dave

    Subject: Georgia MM 704 Red Marker 60A
    Cruising News: Wed. January 13, 2010. Ran aground at Red Marker 60A AICW MM 704 despite all the warnings. We draw 6 ft and were north of the red marker by 150 ft or so and still grounded. We were about 3′ above MLW and were able to get off. The channel is very close to the shore line here. Cruisers with deep draft vessels should use extreme caution here especially approaching at low tide. Stay uncomfortably close to the shore line and approach slowly. Oh, I forgot to mention to forget the magenta line and charts in this location and follow the markers. We knew of the problems with the charts and shallow water and still grounded at a slow speed.
    Capt J Price

    Subject: Brickhill River at ICW
    Cruising News: Came through this area 0n 1/14/10. The chartplotter posted on this website from October or November by Nellie D is absolutely correct. Stay way over to the green side at 60 and 60A. Go east of the “island”, which does not exist. We had nothing less than 12 feet an hour and a half after low tide. We heard three boats aground at 60 or 60 A, close by them. Stay away to the green side. Claiborne Young’s website will keep you put of trouble all the way if you follow it closely.
    Norman Mason

    Yes, in this area ignore the magenta line and go way E. After several sweaty palms episodes there I have carefully transited and recorded the following waypoints (S to N) which give 17 feet at MLW:
    South: 30d 50.85′N, 081d28.66′W
    Mid: 30d 50.92′N, 081d 28.66′W
    North: 30d 51.01′N, 081d 28.73′W
    Stay uncomfortably close to the E shore AND track directly over the marsh shown (incorrectly) in the middle of the intersection. DO NOT hug the reds!
    Carl Gaines

    I just went thru this area and this is what I did. I went close abeam to G57, G57A and G59. Minimum depth for this was 8.2 feet between G57A and G59 minus 2′ for tide. So minimum would be about 6.2 feet.
    Then I proceeded closer and closer to the shore ending up less that 20 yards off by the time I went by G59A.
    I went over the “island” and had over 20 feet. Immediately after the island depth dropped off to 15 feet and I slowly proceeded to turn right towardsG63.
    Minimum depths along the shore was 20 to 26 feet minum two for tide. Stay away from R60 and R60A and R62A.
    This was accomplished 2 hours prior to dead low.
    Capt Dave

    I agree 100% with this report. I have my boat berthed at Golden Isle Marina, St. Simons Island, GA. I would recommend going off shore from St. Simons Island to St. Mary’s. If this section does not get you, Jekyll Creek will. Also it is much faster going off shore even at 7kts.
    M/V Arctic Jasmine

  • Important – Mis-Charted AICW Channel In “Cumberland Dividings” (Statute Mile 700 to 705)

    This is only the latest in a series of postings here on the Cruisers’ Net’s “Georgia” cruising news section about the navigational problems of the AICW section (south of Jekyll Island), known as the “Cumberland Dividings.” Among other problems, NOAA shows the infamous “magenta line” on the wrong side of marker #60A. Take caution when cruising this seciton of the Waterway!

    MM 704 approx. A vessel went aground at 60A as we approached. The red markers appear to be a jumble from afar because of the trick of perspective. I’ve no idea why NOAA hasn’t corrected its errant magenta line at 60A. Skipper Bob has a current description and warning. If you take the markers one at a time, it becomes clear where to go. Just don’t look at the magenta line in the chart, follow red
    right returning.
    We followed the advice on Skipper Bob’s Internet update and kept way off the reds for the whole section and found nothing less than 12 feet.
    Captain Jane Tigar

    Southbound in the Cumberland Dividings between mile 700 and 705 were the Brickhill River enters the Cumberland Dividings at red marker 60A keep well to the east. Stay east of the red 60A.
    Brian
    MIDORI

    Subject: shoaling near 703.5
    Cruising News: We ran aground at r60 between 58a and r60 you have to stay right over next to the shore almost and do not follow the magenta line…..you will need to go over what the chart shows as solid ground. We draw 5’9″ by the way.
    Sami and Barry

  • Chart 11489′s Magenta Line Incorrect at Marker #60 (Statute Mile 704)

    This must be the tenth note we have posed here on the Net’s “Georgia” section about the magenta line being charted on the wrong side of maker #60!

    Cruising News: Traveling south on ICW 1 hour before low tide we kept green”59A” close to port (20-30 feet) until well past red “60″ before beginning our turn starboard. Never saw less than 16 feet of water. On way north saw trawler aground and today sailboat aground in same spot immediately east of marker “60″. Charted course is wrong. STEER CLEAR OF RED “60″
    Bob & Cheryl Klein

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