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 Slips are now available!! On the brand new Dock 5. For information please call (727) 893-7329 or 800 782 8350Southwest Florida Yachts239 461-0775 Legacy Harbour Marina entrance is located on the Okeechobee Waterway East of Marker #49 on the Caloosahatchee River. The Marina is situated two blocks from historic downtown Fort Myers and three blocks from the historic Edison-Ford Winter Estates. The Marina's 131-Slips range in size from 40 feet to 80 feet and can accommodate Transient Boats of 100 feet plus. The large Fairways make our slips easily accessible. Our slips are surrounded by one of the largest 'floating breakwaters' on the Gulf of Mexico. The floating docks are state-of-the-art. Legacy Harbour Marina is a full-featured facility with all the modern conveniences of home including pump-out station, heated pool, fitness center, full electric metered at the slip, cable TV, laundry, air-conditioned showers and wireless Internet connections available. The Boaters' Lounge is available for relaxing after a cruise or for private parties. The view from the lounge is spectacular! Our grounds are beautifully manicured and provide great strolling along the river with benches, Chickee Hut, and excellent access to all of historic Fort Myers. Please take a few moments to browse our website and see for yourself what our  beautiful boating facility can offer you the next time you are cruising in Southwest Florida.Twin Dolphin Marina, 1000 1st Ave. West, Bradenton, Florida 34205-7852, 941.747.8300  -  fax 941.745.2831, e-mail: harbormaster@twindolphinmarina.comBoca Grande Marina, Gasparilla Island, FloridaPink Shell Beach Resort and MarinaLocated at Mile Marker 135 on the Okeechobee Waterway, 15 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, Fort Myers Yacht Basin is a well designed and protected marina. It is owned and operated by the City ofGulf Harbour Marina    
ICW Marker 73, 4.5 miles from Gulf of Mexico  
14490 Vista River Dr.,
Fort Myers, FL 33908
239-437-0881
gulfharbourmarina@comcast.net
St. Andrew's MarinaThe Town of Fort Myers Beach proudly operates and maintains the Matanzas Harbor Municipal Mooring Field. The field boasts 70 mooring balls available for public rental year-round, and accommodates vessels up to 48 feet in length. The mooring field is located east of the Sky Bridge between San Carlos and Estero Islands in Matanzas Pass. For recreational cruisers, the Fort Myers Beach Mooring Field is a wonderful destination. Coming ashore at the Town’s dinghy dock puts boaters in walking distance to beaches, restaurants, shopping, nightlife, and public transportation. Mooring ball rental fees are $13/day or $260/month. All renters MUST register with Matanzas Inn upon arrival. The dinghy dock is available for public use to tie up dinghies 10’ or less (no overnight tie-ups). The dock is located beneath the Sky Bridge between Matanzas Inn Restaurant and the public fishing pier. Riviera Dunes Marina Just off Tampa Bay Owned and Operated by BoatersRegatta Pointe MarinaFisherman's Village Marina and Resort, Punta Gorda, FLThe Port St. Joe Marina is at the heart of Florida's Forgotten Coast, on the eastern shore of pristine St. Joseph Bay on Florida's northern Gulf Coast. Located between Panama City and Apalachicola, FlPunta Gorda, Florida - a GREAT cruising destination

Archive For: NORTHERN GULF – All News

  • Crossing Florida’s Big Bend Experience

    The posting below is longer than what we usually put up on the Cruisers’ Net. However, it is such an excellent account of the often memorable (for good AND bad reasons) experience of crossing Western Florida’s waterwayless “Big Bend” region, I’ve posted the text below in its entirety. Note that this posting is copied from the AGLCA mail list with Captain Quince’s permission

    A fellow cruiser has inquired about our Gulf Crossing so I thought I’d chronicle it for him and share it.
    We arrived at Dog Island hoping for anchorage as the trip across St George Sound Bay had been a rough ride. We started east okay in one footers but after starting to fight the tide at the bridge, the next bit of open water continued to build until we met the confused waters between Dog Island and St George Island. Waves coming from both directions really kicked us around. Then the Shipping Cove turned out to be too rough to anchor so we turned and cranked up the engines heading to Carrabelle.
    The next day brought heavy fog and about noon, a flotilla of Loopers left in a short clearing window. We wondered if we should have gone but the rough water the day before made us wonder. We disconnected power and threw off our lines about 3 0-clock to head out to the anchorage again and abruptly stopped as the fog moved back in. Listened to Hank on Queen Anne’s Revenge come across the bay and up the channel in thick fog. The talked to Mint Julep who anchored in the cove but neither boat ever saw the other. The Fog never lifted.
    We contacted Queen Ann and agreed to leave the following day about 1pm to head out to Dog, thinking we’d pick up Mint Julep as well. (never did as they had moved on the night before) Heavy fog stayed with us the whole day so at 1 we headed out anyway, slowly down the channel from the Moorings to Pick up Queen Ann at C-Quarters. They pulled out and led the way as Hank had good
    experience the previous day but more likely his experience with using radar as a pilot! It was interesting going out the channel as we met a 90 foot research vessel coming in and a couple of other boats as well. Not really a problem going slow, watching radar and working your way out. After Dog Island, Twins took the lead on a waypoint at Clearwater Pass. Queen Ann intended to drop off about 4 am and head to Tarpon Springs.
    The advice we’d received from various sources recommended you be 2 to 3 hours offshore at daybreak so you can see and avoid the crab pots. There are also mileage from the coast guidelines and depth guidelines that help guide where you will start finding them. Like 20-30 miles and less than 30-40 foot depth but I’m not particularly sure of those numbers. So we set a course and started out at 8 knots, later cutting back so we didn’t arrive too early.
    The fog stayed thick and with us for quite a while, about half the way. Boats were about a half to a mile apart and we could see their lights most of the time. Sometimes disappearing into the fog and other times more clearly. We turned on Christmas lights on the bridge to help light the way, 5 strings of white LED lights that draw less than 20 watts total. We also turned on the inverter and settled into our salon for most of the trip. About 8 0-clock I turned on the TV and we had satellite reception all across the bend.
    How to stay awake for 22.5 hours crossing. Yes, it’s a long day..normal wake up at 7am, departure at 1pm, arrival to private dock on Treasure Island at 11:30 am and then up until about 8pm..what’s that, about 37+ hours! We had rested fairly well at Carrabelle. Vaughn bought a 12 pack of diet pepsi to help stay awake. I make some coffee. You’re wired at first with the fog. Then darkness descends. You set the autopilot and stare at the radar screen. The best part of the crossing may be the other boat nearby. Waves were rolling us for the first few hours, then it seemed to calm more about midnight and the crossing eased.
    Vaughn and I took turns at the wheel (actually the radar screen). We ran the boat from above at first and then moved below after darkness. You can pretty well see miles ahead of you with the radar so staring at the screen seems useless. One of us would take the helm, the other watched TV and/or snoozed. We each had about 3 cat naps, the longest was probably an hour and a half. We
    snacked on sandwiches. I had a coffee about 10 pm and Vaughn had a few pepsi’s. About 3:30 am Queen Ann slowed down and turned off toward Tarpon Springs, and we redirected for John’s Pass..they would not arrive at their destination until 11:30 due to very heavy fog..Hank’s now the expert!
    Stars were first seen in the wee hours and a welcome sight, then more fog. We were lucky in that the fog lifted at daybreak. We never saw any crab pots until sunrise, then we saw a new line every minute. Daybreak and the sunrise are especially welcome after such a passage. My wife, Vaughn get’s to see so few sunrises anyway! We never saw any other boats on the crossing either. It’s possible that one or two targets on the radar were other boats but they were never closer than about 5 miles.
    It was a fairly comfortable crossing but at some point I’d reset the autopilot to go to Clearwater and thought I’d arrived at John’s Pass. Took us a little time and phone call to our friends to understand our mistake, then we just motored down the ICW, an enjoyable ride. That afternoon we baked in the sun until we jumped in their pool..freezing at 70 degrees it was not..very refreshing and just what we needed!
    So, in hindsight, I could have probably just relocated to Shipping Cove in the fog but you do get a good night’s sleep at the dock. We could have started later and maintained our 8 knots but that would only make about an hour or two’s difference or so. Longer or shorter travels don’t matter that much over such a time and distance when on autopilot (The boat and the crew). Our trip was 195 miles. The waves and winds treated us fairly. Fog sucked but what can you see in the dark anyway? No moon so it would be dark.
    Next time I want clear skies, a full moon and the millpond sea!
    All that to say we did it with caffeine and cat naps.
    Bring on the Keys and Bahamas
    Forget Hell!!

  • The Living’s Easy in Panama City

    I like spending time in Panama City myself, and, you can’t do better than coil your lines at the Panama City Municipal Marina, a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!!

    The cost for living here is outrageous- the money that has to be spent on sun tan lotion and sandals takes a big bite out of the budget. Then when you have to buy socks to wear with the sandals, you know, for when the temperature plummets to below 60. Thank god for global warming, not only will we be able to eliminate the cost for socks, but there will be many more places to cruise!
    Rudy and Jill
    Briney Bug, Panama City, Fl

  • C-Quarters Marina (Carrabelle)

    C-Quarters is one of two cruiser friendly marinas in the delightful village of Carrabelle. The other is the Moorings!

    At C-Quarters marina in Carribelle Diesel is $2,40 per gal. includingtaxes. Not a fancy marina, but very friendly people and a good overnight before crossing the Gulf. Stores close by.
    Cheers from Queen Ann’s Revenge crossing tomorrow to Tarpon Springs
    CDR Hank & Queen Ann

  • Orange Beach Marina (off AICW between Big Lagoon and Mobile Bay)

    Wow, what a great review of this facility. Note that this message was copied off the AGLCA mail list.

    Hi, everyone. Hope y’all are safe.
    I’ve told y’all about Orange Beach Marina and what a wonderful marina it is…they are especially kind to Loopers and fly the Looper flag proudly. They have a VERY SPECIAL winter rate to May 1…$525/month regardless of size. Power is extra, but my bill runs just a tad under $25.
    They are in a lush, tropical setting with excellent security, new docks and in a quiet residential neighborhood. The transient vehicle is a late model Yukon Suburban. Close showers and a laundry on site next to the transient dock. Two on-site restaurants and two others (expecially Tacky Jacks) a short walk away. The beach, renowned for its sugary sand, is only 2.3 miles away.. A huge, respected boatyard (Saunders Yachtworks).
    And there’s more: Covered barbecue and picnic areas, boat washing and detail service on site, upscale dock store, taxi service, the best, friendliest service help around.
    Both Orange Beach are minutes from each other and both offer libraries, indoor pools, exercise areas, a great wildlife area well within walking distance (deer and other wildlife abound), golf courses, great shopping. In short, it is a paradise!
    And Pensacola Naval Air Station’s world famous air and space museam is really close by.
    Free first night dockage with fill up of 300 gallons or more attract lots of folks…and its just for us Loopers.
    I hate to sound like a shill for the marina, but it is a superb overnight or long-term place to be.
    Just ask for Jimmy at 251 981 4207.

  • Sea Hag Marina (Steihatchee River) and Crossing Florida’s Big Bend, North to South

    First, Michael and Jana’s advice about departing south over the Big Bend region, from Tysons Harbor on Dog Island, is a really good idea. Tysons makes for an excellent anchorage, and you are right at the jumping off point whenever you choose to turn your bow south.
    Sea Hag Marina is the only facility really fitted out for cruising size craft on the Steinhatchee River. As long as you remain the in marked entrance channel, depths should not be a problem on the Steinhatchee. This is one of the deepest of the Big Bend streams.

    Second Star and Emotion III crossed from Dog Island two days ago. As predicted the first six hours were pretty lumpy then it smoothed out. Trip took 10 hours (6 knots) so we left in dark. First we shot the pass and left a bread crumb trail the day prior so the dark passage was at least well plotted. Next time I would leave from Tyson’s Harbor on the far east side of Dog Island which would eliminate the pre dawn departure. The charts don’t show it but that exit is very well marked. We stayed at Sea Hag Marina and experienced no problems getting in. We arrived two hours before high tide.
    Michael & Jana La Porte
    m/v SECOND STAR

    We stayed for a few days at SeaHag Marina in May 2010. Three sailboats plus one trawler. No problems with depth in or out. The Marina was very accomodating, arranging a pick up to give us a ride to a local restaurant. They also provided a ride to the local IGA. Rustic but a great stopover.
    Bob Dorman

    Click Here To View the Western Florida Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Sea Hag Marina

  • Good Words About Port St. Joe Marina (off ICW between Apalachicola and Pan. City)

    The Port St. Joe Marina is at the heart of Florida's Forgotten Coast, on the eastern shore of pristine St. Joseph Bay on Florida's northern Gulf Coast. Located between Panama City and Apalachicola, FlI can tell you from personal experience that Port St. Joe Marina is one of the finest pleasure craft facilities you will find anywere. They are reached by cruising from the Northern Gulf ICW, down the Gulf County Canal, to the waters of St. Joseph Bay. Then, it’s just a brief cruise to the east to reach the marina’s sheltered harbor.
    Oh yes, and let’s not forget these good people are a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    Terrific folks and a great marina – close to everything, good restaurant, and some damn fine Marina Hosts (Ray & Patsy).
    We were sad to leave this morning, but if a weather window opens up this weekend, we wanted to be a bit closer to take advantage and are now at WaterStreet Hotel & Marina in the rain and cold. Starting to think that we should have brought a snow shovel along to keep the dock clear.
    Gerry & LInda Etzold
    Monk’s Vineyard

    Port St. Joe Marina promotes itself as the “friendliest marina on the gulf” and we have to agree. We are there now waiting to cross the gulf. At $1/foot nightly for AGLCA members (and less if you stay a week), they have all the usual amenities, including bikes and a restaurant. The downtown grocery, ice cream, restaurants, and hardware are just a few blocks away. Patsy and Ray Whitney, the harbor hosts, plus all the employees are ready to assist you with anything you need during your stay. During the 12/2 storm, Clara, the marina manager was walking the docks, checking lines and fenders. We’ve only been looping for a couple of months, but Port St. Joe is our #1 so far. It’s a little off the intercoastal, but well worth the effort. If you haven’t come this far yet, be sure to check it out.
    Mainship 34

  • Smack Bayou Anchorage (near Panama City, FL)

    Smack Bayou is located on the opposite side of the Northern Gulf ICW from the Panama City Waterfront, just slightly west of Massalina Bayou.
    The two mooring balls Captain Root refers to below have been in place, as I recall, for years, but there is still room to drop the hook. Many cruisers anchor in Smack Bayou year after year.

    We anchored in Smack Bayou Monday night. Be advised that the charted 8 foot pool that is around the point to starboard has two permanant mooring balls in the middle and partially submerged wreck on the east side. We anchored west and slightly behind the mooring balls in about 8 feet at mid tide. Protection is excellent. However, there is some shoaling coming from the shore line, so I would suggest anchoring ahead of the mooring balls in deeper water to avoid swinging over a shoal.
    An option is to anchor in the first pool after the entrance. A trawler was anchored on the west side of that pool and seemed to do fine. Be aware there is a partially submerged wreck at the far end of that pool.
    Bill Root
    MV Tucandu, currently docked Panama City

  • “Specter Island” Anchorage (Statute Mile

    I have never heard the anchorage referred to below in Captain Root’s note named as “Specter Island, but, then again, the late Skipper Bob apparently knew something I did not about this small land mass. Anyway, it lies south of the ICW, on the section referred to as “the Narrows,” west of Choctawhatchee Bay and Fort Walton Beach.

    We are anchored tonight behind Spectre Island MM 217.4. Enter west of G51 per Skipper Bob, watch your depth carefully as the shoal to the east side is very shallow. We found six feet all the way in, ten feet behind island between it and the barrier island. Barrier island is restricted, but Spectre island is sand, so walking dog should be OK. Alternative is eight foot charted pool east of Spectre Island and along barrier island at 30 24 07N, 86 41 43W
    Travel safe
    Bill Root

  • Ingram Bayou Anchorage (Statute Mile 164)

    Ingram Bayou lies off the northern flank of the ICW, west of the Waterway’s with St. Johns Bayou and Perdido Pass. This is one of my favorite anchorages of all time. It just doesn’t get better than this gang – plenty of depth, good shelter, wonderfully natural shores and ample swing room! See you there!

    Ingrams Bayou anchorage MM164.0 is wonderful. Go all the way in to the charted six foot pool at the back. We found minimum seven feet in the entire pool, except for one short six foot section at the very opening of this pool. Protection is great from all sides, and plenty of swinging room. Several places on shore to land a dog. I suggest getting there early. We arrived about 1500 to find one boat in the back pool. By 1600 we had been joined by five more sailboats.
    Bill Root

  • Watch Our For Arnica Bay – Mill Point Shoal (Statute Mile 165 to 167)

    The charted shoal referred to below by Captain Root lies just east of Bear Point Marina, and south of the ICW channel. A quiick look at chart 11378 will show these shallows quickly, and apprently they are building to the north. Sounds like good advice to favor the northern or red side of the Waterway passage.

    For those behind us, be aware that the marked shoal on the green side of the channel, just past the marina east of MM 165, extends farther out than charted. I suggest favoring the reds MM 165 to MM 167.
    Bill Root

  • Sabine Bay Marina (Pensacola Beach. St. M. 189)

    The entrance to Sabine Bay, home of the facility discussed below, runs to the south, immediately east of the high-rise Pensacola Beach Bridge. This passage has been subject to periodic shoaling in the past, but it has been several years since I sounded its depths. Anyone know what the current MLW depths are in this cut????
    Oh yes, as you will guess from the wording of Captains Steve and Liz’s message below, it is copied from the AGLCA mail list.

    [Sabine Bay Marina is] not listed in Skipper Bobs but just wanted to let any loopers still coming know about a great little marina right in Sabine Bay (ICW mile 189.0). Skipper Bobs only lists the Beach Marina at $1.50/foot with no showers or laundry, but right next door is the Sabine Marina with a few transient slips at $1/foot (plus the florida taxes of course) with great shower, laundry and fun looking bar/restaurant. it’s right at the bridge to Pensacola Beach, so all the shops are within walking distance.
    Steve & Liz Kemper

  • Turner Marina (Dog River – Mobile Bay)

    Turner Marine is the first facility which will be spotted to starboard as you cruise under the high-rise Dog River brdige. They have been occupying this spot for many a year.

    In 2008 we spent 9 weeks at Turner Marine with a blown transmission and enjoyed our stay there. We just completed a 3 day stay and found
    things at Turner changing for the better. The restrooms are improved and a loaner car is now available for shopping trips. Their dockage rates are extremly reasonable as are their labor rates. They have a broad range of repair capeabilities and we have found their work top notch. As they were hosting a Thanksgiving lunch for all their live aboards and transients yesterday, we watched a new 50 ton Travel Lift being unloaded from the truck. It will be in service early in 2010. This third generation, family owned and operated business is staffed by friendly, helpful people who always make us feel most welcome. It is a pleasure to stay there and one of the best stops on the Loop.
    Hank & Ann
    Queen Ann’s Revenge

    We agree with Hank & Ann. We’ve been at Turner Marine for a week. It’s a very nice stop with fine folks, great service and dockage rates that won’t empty your wallet.
    Bill & Kathleen Root
    MV Tucandu

  • Downtown Mobile, Alabama City Dockage

    The article below is interesting news to me. I didn’t think the city of Mobile provided any sort of pleasure craft dockage along their downtown waterfront. I learn something new every day here on the Net.

    The convention center dock is conveniently located right down town. Just walk through the first level parking garage and you’re within blocks of restaurants, bakeries and other entertainment. The dock is free and there are no services (water, electric, etc.). Just call and the security guard will come down and check your paperwork.
    Be aware though, that the debris you pass on your way to Mobile is the debris that you will encounter on your bow at night if you’re the boat in front on the north set of cleats or the lead boat on the south set of cleats. Low tide occurs in the wee hours and so the debris can float free on both sides of your boat.
    Watch your rub rail and the green fenders on the concrete pier. Great protection but put out fenders to soften the blows from the passing tows and inconsiderate boaters.
    Bob

  • St. Andrews Marina (Panama City, St. M. 388)

    St. Andrews Marina is the westernmost of the two excellent facilities owned and manged by the city of Panama City, Florida. I cannot recommend both of these marinas too highly, and not just because they are a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    Subject: Panama City St. Andrews Marina
    Cruising News: Nice to see that St. Andrews coffee shop and Uncle Ernies’s restaurant have survived the economic recession and still serving excellent food. We docked at St. Andrews Marina in Panama City while on a delivery 10.27.09 – 11.3.09 from Bradenton FL to New Orleans LA. We love the St. Andrews neighborhood. A scarecrow competition decorated all the storefronts for Halloween. Musicians played in outdoor pavilion near marina. Marina is clean, floating docks for transients, and walking distance to lovely neighborhood park. Fresh seafood available off the boats docked there.
    We cruised offshore until Pensacola, so cannot comment on ICW water depths.
    Capt. Wendy Young
    Punta Gorda FL

  • South Shore Harbor Marina (Lake Pontchartrain, New Orleans)

    South Shore Harbor Marina is one of the only New Orleans pleasurecraft facilities that is not located in West End Harbor on Lake Pontchartrain. Glad to hear this facility has recovered from the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    Subject: New Orleans South Shore Marina
    Cruising News: South Shore Marina, east of Lakefront airport, is open for business and has lots of dockage available. We delivered a boat here this week. Permanent slips are fixed concrete docks with adequate outpilings. Continuing construction is completing installation of electric and water to some piers. April 2009 we delivered the second boat to dock at this marina. Seven months later, there are around 150 boats docked here with room for another 100 or so. Nice to see this municipal marina up and running. Bathroom and showers clean. For those of you coming south on your loop cruise, consider cruising an extra 2-3 days west from Mobile to dock in New Orleans and see this town coming back to life again.
    Capt. Wendy Young
    Punta Gorda FL

  • Lulu’s at Homeport Marina (St. M. 155)

    Homeport Marina, home of Lulu’s Restaurant, is located along the northerly shores of the Northern Gulf ICW’s run through a man-made canal, east of Mobile Bay. It lies just a stone’s throw east of the high-rise Gulf Shores – Highway 59 bridge.

    Subject: Lulu’s at Homeport Marina Gulf Shores AL
    Cruising News: Lulu’s was a great stop on Halloween. The local high school created a haunted house in the pavilion with $5 entrance donation going back to the school group. A costume contest topped off the evening. This restaurant and “play area” at Homeport Marina, Gulf Shores AL, is one of our favorite stops when delivering a boat to Mobile or west. The “beach”, pavilion and large outdoor restaurant host music and kid/family-friendly activities every day. Don’t pass up the gift shop for your Lucy Buffett souvenir.
    Capt. Wendy Young
    Punta Gorda FL

  • Low Water Levels in the Florida Panhandle as of 10/18/09

    I, too, have experienced the low water – wind tide conditions described by Captain Tom below. As he notes, these depths usually persist only a few days, but while they are underway, soundings can be spooky!

    If you are near or in the Florida Panhandle this morning, you will find the water levels are 1-2 feet below the charted depths. The north winds have been blowing hard for a few days and pushed the water off the coastline. It will come back in a few days; but for now, be careful.
    Stay Safe,
    Tom

  • Praise for Dog River Marina (Mobile Bay)

    Dog River Marina receives my vote for one of the finest marinas on the Northern Gulf Coast! They also offer full repair services!

    We left Dog River Marina (Mobile) this morning on our way Pensacola. This is a first class repair facility. The staff is very professional and helpful. There is a West Marine store on the premises and the Mobile Yacht Club (semi-private) is right across the street. With diesel fuel at $2.43/gal including ValveTech, why would anyone skip this stop on their way to Florida?
    Tom

  • Fuel Prices and Leased Slip Promo at Port St. Joe Marina

    The Port St. Joe Marina is at the heart of Florida's Forgotten Coast, on the eastern shore of pristine St. Joseph Bay on Florida's northern Gulf Coast. Located between Panama City and Apalachicola, FlWow, sounds like a goo deal to me! And, this superb facility is a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    Subject: Fuel Prices & Leased Slip Promo
    Cruising News: Our gas is $3.73 and diesel is $3.18 includes tax. We have a Special on Annual Lease Customer Wet/Dry till October 1st, 2009. Call 850-227-9393 and ask for Clara
    Clara Landry

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