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    • Index of Articles by Our Strategic Partners Captains Mark and Diana Doyle of On The Water ChartGuides

      On the Water GuidebooksIn July of 2012, the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net was honored to welcome Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, founders and owners of On The Water ChartGuides (http://www.onthewaterchartguides.com/), as strategic partners. Diana and Mark will be providing the Cruisers’ Net with regular article and contributions for the foreseeable future.
      We can depend on these veteran cruising authors to perform all the on-the-water, professional research necessary to bring an accuracy to their reports which can simply not be imitated by any other approach.

       

      Photos of Oriental’s Free Town Docks, Neuse River

      AICW Problem Stretch – Northern Fields Cut, SC Statute Mile 574 – Captains Diana and Mark Report

      The “Worst” AICW Problem Stretch – Little Mud River, Georgia (Statute Mile 655) – Captains Diana and Mark Report

      The Latest From Hell Gate AICW Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 602) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Depths Survey As of 9/03/13 of the AICW/New River/New River Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 246)

      Depths Survey As of 9/03/13 of the AICW/Carolina Beach Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 293.5)

      Depths Survey As of 8/29/13 of the AICW/Lockwoods Folly Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 321)

      Bad News and Good News About AICW/Shallotte Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 330)

      Depth Survery For “AICW Channel South of McClellanville, SC to Awendaw Creek” Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 430 to 435)

      Shallow Depths Confirmed on “AICW North of Ben Sawyer Bridge to Isle of Palms Bridge” Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 460)

      Shoaling at Southwestern Tip of Ashepoo – Coosaw Cutoff AICW Problem Stretch Confirmed AGAIN (Statute Mile 517)

      Updates on Fernandina Beach Mooring Field – Captains Mark and Diana Report (St. M. 717)

      AICW Shoaling South of Fernandina Beach, FL Confirmed – Captains Mark and Diana Report (near St. M. 717.5)

      Professional Praise for Osprey Marina (Statute Mile 373.5) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Anchorage with Shoreside Access in Ft. Lauderdale: Middle River (St. M. 1063.4) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      BLAST OFF! Florida’s Indian River Anchorage – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      North Mouth of Alligator River AICW Problem Stretch – Captains Mark and Diana Report (St. M. 81)

      Downtown Hampton, Virginia Public Pier: Great as it Ever Was! – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Focus Your Binoculars and Cameras on Seabirds

      No More Tax-Free Diesel for Transients at Tidewater Yacht Marina, AICW Statute Mile 0, Norfolk, VA

      Carolina Beach Mooring Field Once Again Considered, Captains Mark and Diana Report (Statute Mile 295)

      Skidaway Narrows and Other Low Clearance AICW Bridges ALMOST Gone – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Belhaven, NC Guest Dock Welcomes Boaters – Captains Mark and Diana Report (Statute Mile 135.5)

      South River Anchorages (off North Carolina’s Neuse River, near St. M. 178.5) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Doin’ the Dismal ‘” Dismal Swamp’s Goat Island Anchorage (Statute Mile 43.5, AICW Dismal Swamp Alternate Route) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Don’t Even Think About Anchoroing In The Charted “Oxbow” Off the AICW/Dawho River (Statute Mile 500) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      FORGET THE CHARTS! ICW and Brickhill River (South) Anchorage Breadcrumbs (St. M. 704) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Sunset Lake Anchorage: Just Avoid the Nut Job – off the AICW, hard by Miami Beach – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Marine Stadium Anchorage Review – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Sign of the Times: The Sunset Beach Pontoon Bridge Becomes a Boat Ramp (Statute Mile 338)

      Thoroughfare Creek Anchorage (off AICW/Waccamaw River) – Statute Mile 389 – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      Ladys Island Marina – Captains Mark and Diana Report

      AICW/Browns Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch – Captains Mark and Diana Report (St. M. 237)

      AICW/Lockwood Folly Inlet Intersection Problem Stretch – Captains Mark and Diana Report (St. M. 321)

      Excellent, Detailed Report on Hell Gate AICW Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 602)

      Foul Bottom on Wimbee Creek Anchorage, near AICW Statute Mile 523

      Excellent, Detailed Report on Hell Gate AICW Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 602)

      Detailed Report on AICW/Little Mud River Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 655)

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    • The Cost of Cruising – Part 1 – Ongoing Maintenance by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.


      The Cost of Cruising – Part 1 – Ongoing Maintenance
      We start a new series that explores the cost of cruising. No matter what boat you own, there are certain expenses you will incur on an annual basis for maintenance. These are important to keep the boat cruise worthy. But how much should one plan to spend?
      Bill Parlatore

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    • Medical Emergencies at Sea by Anthony Pozun

      Tony Pozun is New York State Registered Professional Nurse, American Heart Association registered CPR first aid instructor and a retired Nassau County Police Officer/Detective Sergeant with 35 years of service. Tony is also an avid long distance sailor and a regular contributor to Cruisers Net. Thank you Tony!

      Medical Emergencies at Sea
      Anthony Pozun, B.S., R.N.

      I am a retired Detective Sergeant, from the Nassau County Police Department, having served thirty-five years. Twenty of those years were as a patrol officer responding to hundreds of calls for medical emergencies. I was a Certified First Responder, and Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). While assigned to the Police academy I was a master instructor of basic and advanced first aid, EMT and mental health training. I currently have a NYS license in professional Nursing (RN). I am a current member of the Northport Yacht Club, Northport NY, where I am on the training committee. I also teach Basic Boating and Sailing courses for the Neptune Sail and Power Squadron (United States Power Squadrons) in Northport. I have been a boater and sailor for some fifty years. I currently sail and cruise with my wife on our Catalina C 400 Mystical Paradise.

      Now that the boating season is ending, it may be worthwhile to think about vital information for next season. Many of us who boat love its sense of adventure, enjoyment and freedom. When we go out on our vessels though we leave the safety and convenience of our home and face many different challenges. One of the most challenging is medical emergencies at sea. Whether we boat close to home in a bay, sound, coastal or long distances, the time speed and distances involved, limits our ability in seeking and receiving outside medical help in an emergency. Whereas on land we may get help in a matter of minutes, on the water it may be indeed many minutes or hours before receiving professional help. To an extent we must learn to become self-sufficient. This includes having some basic knowledge of first aid.

      Modern medicine has had amazing medical advances throughout the years. It is equally amazing though how little has changed about emergency medical
      care away from home. This article is not meant to recommend specific recommendations regarding medical aid at sea, but give a practical approach in obtaining enough knowledge of emergency care, and keeping some useful equipment on board for use during an emergency

      For this article I will address two categories of how most of us boat.

      1. Local boating where nearby friends, crew can render aid, or summons help quickly. And professionals may render aid in timely manner.
      2. Coastal cruising away from home perhaps hours away from help.

      Within these two categories you will be able to communicate with medical personnel, and or deliver a sick or injured to an emergency room within hours. Most common on-board emergencies though will be treatable without outside assistance at least initially and limit further injury. To do these onboard treatments, you need a reference of medical knowledge, either yourself or a reference (book), and some basic medical equipment. Most of us may not have the necessary knowledge or the stamina to treat without some help and the following medical emergency references would be of value. Note any reference guide to be of any value should be read thoroughly before a situation happens. This is not a comprehensive list as there are hundreds of worthy publications available to those who do some research.

      Advanced First aid American Red Cross
      First Aid Afloat, by Doctors Eastman/ Levinson; ////
      Pocket Emergency Medicine, by Hamdani;
      First Aid Afloat by Robin Horworth;
      On Board Medical Emergency Handbook by Briggs / Mackenzie;
      First Aid Companion by, Hillincourt;
      .
      If you are unprepared for the emergency despite your knowledge and references available, your VHF and or cell phones should enable you to gain access to shore side medical advice. The local Police, Fire Departments, and or the Coast Guard may offer advice and or be able to put you in touch with doctors and other medical professionals.

      Once you have made an informed decision that your knowledge, references and your ability are adequate to treat the current situation, you would probably need some medical supplies say as those in a good on-board medical kit. Many retailers, boating supply houses, specialty adventure type stores, even medical supply houses themselves offer
      good quality (often expensive) medical kits. But all kits may not be specific to your usage and needs. With a bit of planning and research you can put together a kit specific to your needs and use. Your kit can be put in an ordinary plastic (doesn’t rust) tool or fishing tackle box, the size and type of which is according to your amount of supplies. Listed below are some necessary supplies. Some items must be prescribed by a doctor.

      Medical Condition Item

      Lacerations Iodine, Beta dyne
      Alcohol preps
      4 x 4 in gauze
      Steristrips (stitching)
      Assorted band aids
      2in and 4in cotton rolls
      ½ in bandage tape
      Triple Antibiotic ointment
      Bactroban ointment
      One pair sharp pint scissors
      Tweezers, Forceps

      Sea Sickness Meclizine, Transderm Scop patch Bonine, Dramamine
      Wrist bands
      Ginger tablets, coke syrup

      Allergic Reactions Epi Pen (epinephrine.)
      Epinephrine Bottle
      Oral Benadryl 25mg tabs
      Claritin tabs

      Infection Augmentin 500 mg tabs
      Doxycycline 100mg tabs v
      Neosporin ointment
      Neosporin ear suspension
      Cipro 500mg tabs

      Asthma attack Pro air albuterol inhaler
      Prednisone

      Cough Delsuym or another OTC medicine
      Menthol cough drops

      Anti-inflammatory/Pain Advil/Motrin/ ibuprofen
      Aleve

      Fever Tylenol extra strength tabs

      Nasal congestion Afrin spray
      Sudafed tabs

      Minor burns, abrasions Bactine, Lanaicaine spray

      Stings, bites Hydrocortisone ointment
      Calamine Lotion
      Ambesol

      Gastric/Diarrhea Pepsid, Mylanta, Tums
      Imodium, Charcoal tabs

      Fractures/contusions Triangular bandage
      Various splints/ splint bandage
      Assorted ace bandage

      Cardiac chest pain Aspirin 325 mgs

      Cardiac patient /potential Ambu bag (forced air inflator)
      Mouth air mask
      Defibrillator

      Some basic first aid, certainly not everything.

      1. Attend to severe bleeding first. Remember DEPT: use clean gauze apply Direct pressure to wound; Elevate wound above the heart; apply Pressure to pressure points (brachial inside of bicep, femoral inside of thigh); apply Tourniquet just above wound***used only as a last resort, when if bleeding continues, person will die

      2. Cardiac arrest /cessation of breathing/ call for immediate help, remember CAB

      C Circulation, lack of heartbeat perform chest compressions
      A Airway, clear airway of obstruction person on back /chin lift
      B Breathing, listen and look chest movement if none start mouth to mouth

      3.Wounds with impaled objects or imbedded glass/ do not remove object, cover with clean gauze, wrap loosely, do not apply any heavy ointment/crème. Clean wounds/ close wounds if possible, wrap to stop bleeding, keep immobilized, and keep out dirt.
      4. Eye wounds/ protect eye keep out sun cover with gauze patch, do not cause pressure.
      5. Bruises Contusions sprains/ apply ice immediately, ace bandage to immobilize, put no pressure on joint limb etc., and limit movement
      6. Fractures/ Dislocations/ immobilize limb/ splint limb in place as found (never reset bone/ limb) use gauze cover to stop any bleed.
      7. Burns/ if slight soak in cold water. Skin broken cover same with gauze (air hurts) do not apply ointment or cream, treat for shock (elevate feet)
      8. Fainting spells/ have person lie down elevate feet. Monitor /watch breathing.
      9. Heat poisoning and heat stroke/ remove from sun/heat, cool off slowly, give water sparingly
      10. Ingested poisons substances/ give copious amounts of water; induce vomiting only if ingested substances are nonacid (may burn on way out).
      11. Stings bites imbedded small objects spines/ clean area remove stinger or hook apply antibiotic/Ambesol, cover with clean gauze /band aid

      In closing, boating can be great fun and freedom, but with that fun and freedom comes responsibility. Look into buying an emergency medical reference(s) to keep on board. Local book stores, Amazon and many online sites can get you what you will need. If you don’t have a first aid kit, buy or prepare one for the sake of yourself, your loved ones and crew on the boat. If you have never taken a first aid course or it’s been awhile since you took one, contact your local American Red Cross or local Fire Department and attend a basic first aid course. With a little preparation research and work on your part most emergencies at sea (wherever that is for you), can be handled without loss of life or limb. Happy and safe boating.
      Anthony Pozun

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    • Sailing Injuries by Anthony Pozun

      Tony Pozun is New York State Registered Professional Nurse, American Heart Association registered CPR first aid instructor and a retired Nassau County Police Officer/Detective Sergeant with 35 years of service. Tony is also an avid long distance sailor and a regular contributor to Cruisers Net. Thank you Tony!

      Sailing Injuries
      By Anthony Pozun, BS, RN.

      Anthony Pozun is a New York State registered professional nurse and former Detective Sgt., EMT, first aid basic and advanced courses instructor at the Nassau County police Academy. He is a current member and certified instructor for the United States power squadrons for sail and basic boating courses of instruction. He has been an avid boater and sailor for 50 years. He has sailed intensively on Long Island sound with his wife Barbara for the past 30 years. He has traveled and sailed the East Coast including the Intracoastal Waterway from Northport to Florida and the Bahamas and back again. He currently sails a Catalina C 400 Mystical Paradise, sailboat set up for long-term cruising. He has written many sails and first aid, articles, which have been published in many local and national boating periodicals.

      Sailing as a pastime, hobby or a full-time leisure activity, can be both fulfilling and enjoyable. A sailboat has many working parts necessary to convert wind into propulsion to use the sailboat. These many working parts need to be respected, and preplanning is essential in their usage. The many working parts and movement of these parts and the sailboat itself, can cause accidents, falls, collisions, which may lead to injury sometimes severe. But with a little bit of planning and forethought, before its usages, the sailboat and its many working parts, can be enjoyed without injury.

      This article will discuss the possible incidents and accidents, leading to injuries, and will give some suggestions for preplanning, prevention, commonsense rules, on dealing with the many working parts of a sailboat to prevent injuries. Additionally, at the end a basic primer on basic first aid including some of these of injuries will be discussed. These incidents include falling overboard, falling down hatches, falling, tripping on working lines and devices around the deck or cockpit. Hand and finger injuries as well as swinging boom injuries will be discussed. Running aground or hitting fixed objects will also be covered. Cooking aboard injuries, maintenance injuries, and seasickness although not a true injury, will be discussed. One overriding principle to be used to prevent accidents occurring, is to preplan in one owns mind what needs to be accomplished, how to do it, what can go wrong, how injury can be prevented.

      Being swept overboard is one of the most fatal type injuries that can occur on a sailboat. But most overboard incidents can be avoided with the application of certain precepts. These include using a little common sense, some preplanning caution and a thorough examination and assessment of one’s environment and surroundings. Put together this is all called prevention. The main thought of any person should be “stay on the boat”,” stay on the boat”,” stay on the boat”. Asking oneself to do I need to work on deck, what pitfalls are present, i.e. low or no lifelines, low freeboard, open transom, etc., that could lead to going overboard. All crew members working on the sailboat should at least wear a PFD, personal flotation device. A member alone on deck, at the helm, or a lone sailor, should always wear a PFD, with a safety harness and tether attached to the boat, because no one will see him or her being swept overboard. Mentally crewmembers or guests should obey the adage when moving about; “one hand for me, one hand for the boat”. They should move about low to the deck, slowly and purposely always keeping one hand attached to the boat. Because we cannot always prevent persons going overboard, certain safety equipment should be available on the sailboat. This may include main overboard poles, life rings, throw rings, floatable, cushions. A hoist, PFD’s with GPS locators, all items to assist retrieval of persons thrown overboard. Secondly , Captains and their crew should practice man overboard drills to see how it’s done, to deal with any issues that arise, so in a real incident they know what to do.
      Another serious incident is falling through open hatches and walkways. This can result in injuries ranging from contusions to serious fractures. Again, a little prevention through preplanning will help. The adage “one hand for me one hand the boat “must be observed. When moving about a moving or stationary boat one must move cautiously, slowly, and with purpose. Rushing about only causes injuries. Crew members or guests before sailing should study the locations of hatches, companion ways, and other openings which could cause a fall. Think before you move, move slowly, should be your mental condition. Owners of boats may mark those areas of danger with protective foam, and or highlight with bright colors or decals to warn others.
      A third incident that may occur is tripping and falling on deck and cockpit lines and many devices used during sailing. These injuries include bruises, contusions and fractures to toes, feet, lower limbs and upper limbs from tripping and falling. Preplanning and Prevention is the key to prevent these injuries. First, study your environment, know what can trap or trip you i.e. lines, cleats, blocks, winches, and many other devices which may bite. Always move slowly purposely keeping one hand for you one hand for the boat as your mantra. Always wear sturdy shoes, boat shoes or sneakers. Never move about the boat with sandals, Flip-flops, other loose footwear or barefoot. Think before you move, ask yourself is this necessary, and what can happen to me.
      A fourth type of incident which can lead to serious consequences is swinging boom accidents. The boom on a sailboat is constantly moving, is heavy and has a tremendous amount of force behind it. Injuries are many and include concussions to the head, injuries to the body and even being swept overboard. Crewmembers and passengers should always assess the possibility of being struck by the boom. Some prevention includes, not moving about, not standing up completely, and watching for accidental jibes or tacks which may cause accidental movement of the boom. Crew and guests should always listen to commands of the captain, during tacks and jibes, and only move about if it is necessary as part of their job. Before moving, think of what the task is, stay low, move slowly and purposely, again keeping the adage “one hand for me one for the boat.”
      Another incident which can cause serious injury is hitting another object, boat, fixed dock etc. or sandbar, which causes immediate stoppage of the boat. In these situations, persons may be thrown about. Injuries occurring from this include contusions, abrasions, fractures, concussions and many worse. Preplanning and prevention is the key to preventing these types of injuries. Always know where your boat is, what are my depths, where are the hazards I may encounter. Common sense and preplanning must always be used to control the direction and motion of the boat. Captains and crew must constantly be observant for these hazards and prepare to avoid them. Use of charts, maps, radar or sonar if available, previous knowledge or information should be diligently applied. If there is ever a question or unknown information which causes a dangerous condition, captain or crew should immediately slow or stop the boat, reassesses the situation and if necessary contact, via radio persons that know the area and may help. The Coast Guard, Tow Boat US, Sea Tow, Harbormasters, or even local commercial fisherman are persons with a wealth of information about local areas unfamiliar to the boater. The avoiding of any object should be the focus of a crewmember or the captain.
      Cooking on a boat is not like cooking at home on a steady platform. Because of movement of boat, hot water, steam, flames, may move, surfaces may move, items may shift resulting in burns, cuts from knives, or appliances, injuries to body from movement. Preplanning and prevention may help: know your environment; are there possible splashes of hot fluids, loose items, sharp edges, that will hurt me. Cruising crew should always think of what they are going to do, secure loose items, obtain necessary tools before they start. Always know the limits and capacities of cooking systems, danger or flame, spillage possibilities and other things that may injure. They should always know the location of emergency gas shutoff switches, fire extinguishers, and procedures of what to do in case of fire. Again, they should move slowly purposely and obey the adage one hand for me one hand for the boat. If cooking underway, person in galley should use available handholds and or be tied in to secure locations to prevent falls.
      Seasickness although not a true injury, is an illness that can cause much dismay pain and discomfort as to ruin the crewmembers or guest day and/or trip. Often called motion sickness, mal de mar, “I want to die syndrome”, and many other terms, it can be a wrenching illness. It is caused by one’s brain and central nervous system receiving conflicting signals from the inner ear and the eyes. It can occur out on the ocean or on a calm day in a bay with devastating results. The symptoms may include: dizziness; nausea; vomiting; painful stomach; balance problems; feeling of movement when there is none. Prevention before the onset of seasickness is perhaps the only cure. Medically there are medications and devices which may be taken including, Bonine Meclizine, Benadryl and others. Accu bands which create pressure on key pressure points on the wrist, have been known to prevent seasickness also. Avoiding heavy greasy meals before or during sailing, avoiding caffeine drinks, and avoiding those foods which is known in the past to cause sickness will help. While on board sit in the middle of the boat, keep your eyes open on the water and boat, keep busy if possible, hydrate with water, ginger ale, cola syrup, eat ginger cookies, saltines etc. Do not go below. Sometimes sleep can cure the illness. Often the only cure may be to get oneself on dry land. In any event prevention before the onset seems to be the most diligent cure.
      Because a sailboat as many working systems, maintenance is necessary. Performing maintenance can cause a myriad of injuries if not thought out ahead of time. First know your limitations is this a job I can do for myself or left to professionals. Know your equipment engine parts and other moving parts i.e. blocks, lines, winches, electrical, booms. Moving or standing rigging can catch or hit body parts, causing simple to massive injuries. If there be a choice of working on Dynamic versus Stagnant machinery systems, working on stagnant, non-moving or non-charged systems is always preferred: Hands or other body parts may get caught in a moving engine; The charged Electrical system may cause serious burns; Rigging under load (which has tremendous release force capabilities) will cause serious injuries. Preplanning safety includes making sure these systems are all shut down and not under load. Plan move slowly and purposely. Have all tools available/ think before acting. Use extreme caution if it is necessary to work on Dynamic, moving or charged systems, i.e. engine adjustments, electrical adjustments, rigging and sailing repairs. When working on boat on dry land be sure ladders are safe and secured to the boat. Be particularly slow and cautious on ladders, move slowly and cautiously as falls from heights to the ground may be catastrophic.

      Some basic first aid, certainly not everything.

      1. Attend to severe bleeding first. Remember DEPT use clean gauze, apply Direct pressure to wound; Elevate wound above the heart; apply Pressure to pressure points (brachial inside of bicep, femoral inside of thigh); apply Tourniquet just above wound***used only as a last resort., when if bleeding continues, person will die immediately.
      2. Cardiac arrest /cessation of breathing/ call for immediate help, remember CAB
      C Circulation, lack of heartbeat- perform chest compressions
      A Airway, clear airway of obstruction person on back /chin lift
      B Breathing, listen and look chest movement if none- start mouth to mouth

      3. Wounds with impaled objects or imbedded glass/ do not remove object, cover with clean gauze, wrap loosely, do not apply any heavy ointment/crème. Clean wounds/ close wounds if possible, wrap to stop bleeding, keep immobilized, and keep out dirt.
      4. Eye wounds/ protect eye keep out sun cover with gauze patch, do not cause pressure.
      5. Bruises Contusions sprains/ apply ice immediately, ace bandage to immobilize, put no pressure on joint limb etc., and limit movement
      6. Fractures/ Dislocations/ immobilize limb/ splint limb in place as found (never reset bone/ limb) use gauze cover to stop any bleed.
      7. Burns/ if slight soak in cold water. Skin broken cover same with gauze (air hurts) do not apply ointment or cream, treat for shock (elevate feet)
      8. Fainting spells/ have person lie down elevate feet. Monitor /watch breathing.
      9. Heat poisoning and heat stroke/ remove from sun/heat, cool off slowly, give water sparingly
      10. Ingested poisons substances/ give copious amounts of water; induce vomiting only if ingested substances are non-acid (may burn on way out).
      11. Stings bites imbedded small objects spines/ clean area remove stinger or hook apply antibiotic/Ambesol, cover with clean gauze /band aid.
      13. Water Hypothermia- remove person from water immediately. Remove wet clothing cover with space blanket or dry blanket. Re heat body slowly warm (not hot wrapping), warm liquids Monitor vitals, TX for shock.
      14. Shock- from loss of blood to brain/ other trauma–. Have person lie down elevate feet monitor all vitals watch especially for breathing. Give o 2 as needed.
      15. Head injuries concussions –treat open wounds as above. Have person lie down, check and monitor vitals, closely continue to monitor breathing and vitals. Get immediate help.

      Whether it be day sailing in the bay or cruising on the coast, sailing is an adventure. But it is a working adventure with an environment of many moving parts and systems. These working dynamic systems must be worked with and respected. The sailor must constantly assess and reassess his surroundings and actions to those surroundings, for to ignore them may lead to serious injury and more. Boat and crew preparation as well as planning is essential. Sailing can be rewarding and absent of accidents and incidents. Where sailors prepare their boat with regards to safety, have a plan, know and using known safe techniques, use non-sense approaches, analyze tasks and move slowly, they will insure a safe and happy voyage. This is true for the big ocean sailor, as well as the small day sailor.

      Fair winds and happy sailing to all…author

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    • Hurricane Season Port Condition Definitions

      Along with Watch and Warning designations, these alphabetical listings, W, X, Y and Z, i.e. Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee and Zulu, are used to indicate the anticipated severity of an approaching storm. And while the port restrictions are directed primarily at commercial traffic, the same port conditions allow recreational boaters to gauge the level of risk from the storm. Obviously, the further along the alphabet, the more severe the forecast for a given port or coastline. This year, port conditions have been issued several times for entire coasts in the Gulf and on the East coast. The official hurricane season is from June 1 to November 30.

      HURRICANE SEASON PORT CONDITIONS AND CATEGORIES
      Port Conditions are set by the Captain of the Port and are used to alert the maritime community to changes in port operations needed to prepare for the storm’s arrival.

      PORT CONDITION WHISKEY: Gale force winds (34 knots or 39 mph) are predicted to arrive within 72 hours. Port Status: Open to all commercial and recreational traffic.

      PORT CONDITION X-RAY: Gale force winds are predicted to arrive within 48 hours. Port Status: Open to all commercial and recreational traffic.

      PORT CONDITION YANKEE: Gale force winds are predicted to arrive within 24 hours. Port status: Closed to inbound traffic and vessel traffic control measures in effect on vessel movements within the port.

      PORT CONDITION ZULU: Gale force winds are predicted to arrive within 12 hours. Port Status: Closed to all inbound and outbound traffic.

      PORT CONDITION RECOVERY: The storm is no longer a threat to the area, however, some damage may have occurred and response and recovery operations are in progress. Port status: Reopened to outbound traffic at the completion of the port survey. Vessel traffic control measures remain in effect on vessel movements within the port.

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    • Treatise on First Aid by Anthony Pozun

      Tony Pozun is New York State Registered Professional Nurse, American Heart Association registered CPR first aid instructor and a retired Nassau County Police Officer/Detective Sergeant with 35 years of service. Tony is also an avid long distance sailor and a regular contributor to Cruisers Net. Thank you Tony!

      Treatise on First Aid

      It is astounding, that basic first aid care has remained the same for years. Discounting all the new technological advances in “electronic first aid intervention and monitoring,” emergency first aid is the same as it was, almost one hundred years ago. First aid consists of many inherent common-sense approaches.

      First Aid is that care given initially by someone to a victim of trauma or accident. It is usually given by a layman as they abound in the population. It is designed to stop the ongoing detrimental process and pain. If given properly, first aid has long lasting positive effects and can be lifesaving.

      I’ll discuss remedies from most severe to less. Stop severe bright red pulsing bleeding first. The acronym D.E.P.T can remind of the care for all bleeding: Direct pressure to wound; Elevate the wound above the heart; apply Pressure to pressure points (brachial inside of bicep, femoral inside of thigh); apply a Tourniquet just above wound. The latter is used only as a last resort, when if bleeding continues, the person may die.

      Cardiac arrest, cessation of breathing, call for immediate help, give Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) as needed. For CPR the acronym C.A.B. is used: C perform chest Compressions; A insure clear Airway; B give Breaths, i.e., mouth to mouth. If airway is blocked by object, (no breathing, voice) stand behind victim. Place hands around waist by navel, thrust inward and upward, until object is expelled.

      Wounds should be covered with clean gauze, tissue, cloth. Impaled objects or embedded glass should be covered to prevent dirt penetration and never removed. Eye wounds should be covered loosely to prevent dirt and light penetration. All the previous, lessens pain and chances of infection.

      Fractures, dislocations, obvious out of place limbs. Limb should be immobilized by splinting as found. Laymen should never attempt resetting limbs. Where bone is exposed, open wound should be covered with clean gauze.

      Common bruises, contusions and sprains, are evidenced by blueness, swelling and pain. They should be covered with ice or cold and immobilized. This limits movement to ease pain prevent further injury.

      Burns evidenced by skin that is red to charred. Where skin intact, it should be soaked in cold water. Where skin is broken, it should be covered to ease pain and prevent infection. In severe burn cases, person put on back, feet should be elevated to prevent shock.

      Fainting spells, shock, is body’s reaction to blood deprivation to brain. Person is pale, has elevated heartrate. If not already down, have person lie down, elevate feet. The person should be watched closely, given CPR as necessary.

      Heat exhaustion, and heat stroke is bodies reaction to excessive work, sunlight and or heat. Red dry skin, high temperature, delirium, are symptoms. Persons should be immediately removed from heat and cooled slowly. Water should be given sparingly.

      Ingested poisons or dangerous substances swallowed, should be diluted by ingestion of copious amounts of water. Vomiting may be induced if substance is NOT caustic, as it may burn more on regurgitation.

      Common stings, spines, hooks, bites, or embedded small objects (swelling of skin) should be left in place. Areas should be covered with clean gauze or cloth if available. This limits penetration of dirt and reduces chance of infection.

      First aid is life saving techniques, that have been unchanged for many years. Although it is the first care, its effects are long lasting. Most are common sense techniques that most people know. They can ease pain and prevent further damage. The fact that common layman abound, the proper application of First aid techniques by them, can achieve positive results, and save lives.
      Tony Pozun

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    • ICW – Prepare Your Boat For The Trip by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

      ICW – Prepare Your Boat For The Trip
      Preparing your boat for the trip south on the ICW is much the same for preparing for the Great Loop or other extended coastal cruising. The time spent before you leave will pay for itself in less trouble and preventable issues once you leave home waters.

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    • Coast Guard MSIB on LED Interference

      Our thanks to BoatUS for this notice.

      U.S. Coast Guard issues Marine Safety Alert on potential interference problem

      ALEXANDRIA, Va., Aug. 30, 2018 – With their low battery draw, cooler operation and sturdy construction, LED lights have been popular with recreational boaters. The lights may also be causing poor VHF radio and Automatic Identification System (AIS) reception, according to a Marine Safety Alert issued by the U.S. Coast Guard on August 15. The BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water is urging boat owners to follow the Coast Guard’s simple test procedures for LED interference and report any instances to the Coast Guard Navigation Center.

      The alert, issued for informational purposes, outlines reports received from mariners concerning radio frequency interference caused by LED lamps that “were found to create potential safety hazards.” In some cases, the Coast Guard says, the interference may cause problems if mariners need to call for help. The interference can affect VHF voice communications as well as Digital Selective Calling (DSC) messages, and it may also affect AIS because they also use VHF radio. In particular, masthead LED navigation lights on sailboats may cause problems due to their close proximity to antennas.

      The Coast Guard advises that it is possible to test for the presence of LED interference by using the following procedures:

      Turn off LED light(s).
      Tune the VHF radio to a quiet channel (for example, channel 13).
      Adjust the VHF radio’s squelch control until the radio outputs audio noise.
      Re-adjust the VHF radio’s squelch control until the audio noise is quiet, only slightly above the noise threshold.
      Turn on the LED light(s).
      If the radio now outputs audio noise, then the LED lights are causing interference and it is likely that both shipboard VHF marine radio and AIS reception are being degraded by LED lighting. Potential solutions include contacting an electronics repair facility to address the problem, changing the LED bulb to incandescent bulb or fixture, or increasing the separation between the LED light and antenna.

      The Coast Guard also requests those experiencing this problem to report their experiences to the Coast Guard Navigation Center by selecting “Maritime Telecommunications” on the subject drop-down list, then briefly describing the make and model of LED lighting and radios affected, the distance from lighting to any antennas and radios affected, and any other information that may help them understand the scope of the problem.

      If you’d like to learn more about VHF DSC radio or AIS operation, BoatUS Foundation has online courses and a free DSC VHF tutorial at BoatUS.org.

      ###

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    • A New Adventure – Round 2 by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

      A New Adventure – Round 2
      Turning a fast chase boat into a cruiser is the next goal of world cruisers, Scott and Mary Flanders. They have found the right boat, trucked her to North Carolina, and in a few months begin the modifications necessary to create a highly competent pocket cruiser.

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    • What is Life Beyond Boating? by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.


      What is Life Beyond Boating?
      At some point, we must think of the future. We are the luckiest generation as we enjoy a longer life span than our parents, generally have better health, and hopefully many active years ahead of us. How do we get there, by plan or by chance?

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    • Monday Minute – Get That Seating Right by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

      Monday Minute – Get That Seating Right
      Inspired from comments made from last week’s post, let’s discuss helm seat options. There is no one solution for comfortable and safe seating at the helm on all boats. It is something designers and builders used to ignore. Today it gets the attention it deserves. Notice the helm seating when you go to the upcoming boat shows. And can you get around it once it is in position?

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    • Monday Minute – Midsummer Maintenance by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

      It’s been a crazy summer around Annapolis, with constant rain and heavy humid air on Chesapeake Bay. Not much fun for boating, but as we move into the second half of the season, it’s a good time to do some midsummer maintenance.
      Bill Parlatore

      Monday Minute – Midsummer Maintenance

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    • Repairing an Onboard On-Demand Pressurized Water Pump by Eddie and Cara

      Our thanks to Eddie and Cara for sharing their repair expertise as recorded in their excellent blog, The Crabby Captain and the Sunny Sailor

      Repairing an onboard on-demand pressurized water pump
      Evaluating and repairing of our water pump. Good information for sailors. Also, if you watch until the end you will see a What NOT to do. LOL

      https://thecrabbycaptainandthesunnysailor.com/2018/07/16/how-to-troubleshoot-and-repair-an-on-demand-water-pump/

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    • Well Equipped or A Hoarder? by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

       
      Everyone has a tolerance for a certain amount of clutter. On the sometimes limited space of cruising boats, having spares for every contingency must be balanced with knowing where everything is while not sinking the boat with tons of spares, consumables, and items that somehow find their way aboard.

      Are You Well Equipped or A Hoarder? from Following Seas by Bill Parlatore

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    • Smoke Signals by Bill Parlatore

      Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for permitting Cruisers’ Net to post articles from his excellent blog, Following Seas.

       

       
      When your diesel engine exhaust goes from clear to blue, white, or black smoke, this is usually an indication of several factors going on that might need your attention…

      Smoke Signals from Following Seas by Bill Parlatore

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    • Lessons Learned by Jan and David Irons

      Our thanks to Jan and David Irons for these beautiful photos and report from their first Great Loop miles. You are sure to recognize familiar spots along the Waterway.

      After just over 400 miles on The Great Loop, our learning curve has SKYROCKETED & this is only the beginning. We have so much to learn!
      Click Here for 1st 400 Miles of The Great Loop: Lessons Learned

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    • Inspecting Fuel Tanks by Bill Parlatore

      The condition of your fuel tanks should be every captain’s concern. Our thanks to Bill Parlatore for this excellent article.

      Here’s the newest post from FollowingSeas!

      Inspecting Fuel Tanks

      It is a good idea to inspect your fuel tanks every so often. Keeping them dry and well secured is vital for toruble free cruising. It also helps to check other components that come in contact with the tanks. Having piece of mind is a good thing. 
      Read on »

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    • From the Log of M/Y OLOH by A.J. Hammer, April 28, 2018

      Captain A.J. Hammer has given Cruisers’ Net permission to share excerpts from his blog, Adventures of OLOH. In these logs you will find beautiful photographs of and comments on the sights and scenes along the waters plied by the M/Y OLOH.

      FROM: The Captain –
      Conditions_ Sun and clouds.
      Winds from the southeast 10-15 mph. Seas 2-3 feet.
      Distance traveled_ 56 nautical miles
      Time underway_ 7 hours 33 minutes

      Key Largo to Fort Lauderdale, April 28, 2018

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