Boaters are our business and our only business. We are located directly on the ICW, and offer Exceptional Lowcountry facilities and hospitality. The Beaufort/Port Royal area is a beautiful and historiLadys Island Marina - Beaufort, SCSeaside Luxury at its bestVHF 16 & 68   Located on the Sampit River, Harborwalk Marina is only a boardwalk away from Georgetown's Historic District, great food, shopping, etc. A safe harbor from bad weather and located in calmDataw Island Marina, 100 Marina Drive, Dataw Island, SC 29920 Mile Marker 521, 843 838 8410Welcome to The City Marina The City Marina Wins Jack Nichol Award for Design See our feature on The Visitors Network Located on mile marker 469.5 of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the Charleston City Marina features 19,000 feet of linear dock space covering 40 acres of water.  The marina was named 2005 National Marina of the Year (Marina Dock Age Magazine), and offers state-of-the-art amenities and facilities to promise an enjoyable stay.  The City Marina's MegaDock extends 1,530 feet and is the longest free standing floating fuel dock in the Southeast.  These features, and Historic Downtown Charleston location, make The City Marina one of the east coast's most popular marinas.
A Marina That's As Luxurious As It Is Convenient Close to Myrtle Beach with clear sailing to the Atlantic. The Harbourgate Marina Village is your  gateway in North Myrtle Beach to all the excitement aThe Downtown Marina Of Beaufort, SC, 1006 Bay Street Beaufort, SC 29902 (843) 524-4422 or Marker #239 on ICW
At Bucksport cruising visitors will discover all new docks, new power pedestals, a newly reopened on-site restaurant, clean – climate controlled showers and laundromat, as well as a warm welcome for the cruising communityTransients Welcome - Under new ownership - Located at mile marker 354 in Myrtle Beach South CarolinaOsprey MarinaIsle of Palms Marina is located on the east side of the Intracoastal Waterway, northeast of Charleston at Mile 456.5 and south of ICW Marker 116.  50 41st AvenueHarbour Town at Hilton Head, with its familiar red-and-white-striped lighthouse, is a fine resort marina with an enormous number of amenities.Windmill Harbour Marina, Hilton Head SCMyrtle Beach Yacht Club is unmatched for its Lowcountry charm and gracious hospitality.

News From Downtown Beaufort Marina (Statute Mile 536.5)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 07-19-2012

We had the happy occasion to visit in person with Captains Mandy and Rick Griffin, proprietors of SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, Downtown Marina of Beaufort, on 7/18/12. We gathered a whole raft of new and updated information.
First of all, Captain Mandy updated us on the often changing opening schedule of the nearby Lady’s Island Bridge. You can check out the updated regulations at http://www.CruisersNet.net/ladyae™s-island-bridge.
Next, we discovered that Downtown Beaufort Marina is running a new, 3-month dockage special. Those who commit to a 90-day stay will pay an appealing $13.50 per foot, per month!
Captain Mandy also updated us thoroughly on the downtown Beaufort Restaurant situation. And, we had the happy opportunity ourselves to dine at Plums for lunch, Blackstone’s Cafe for breakfast and Breakwater Restaurant for dinner. No comment on what all this eating did to my waistline, but all three meals were SUPERB. Downtown Beaufort has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to GOOD dining.
You can check out all Captain Mandy’s other restaurant tips by following the link to Downtown Beaufort Marina’s listing in the SSECN South Carolina Marina Directory, below. Just scroll down to the “Restaurant Recommendations” field.
Next, Captain Rick give us the GOOD news that his facility has received a $100,000.00 community assistance grant. This money will be used to upgrade the marina’s dockside power, particularly the 50-amp hookups, and establish a mooring field west of the dockage basin. Due to the permitting process, the power upgrades are probably six months away, and planning studies are just getting underway for the mooring field. Nevertheless, this is great future news for an already first class facility!

We can say without hesitation that this marina, operated by two of the finest folks in the business, is a great place to visit. We would not take anything for our time spent there and miss the whole crowd down there immensely. Everything you need is close by. Stop in and tell them that Dan and Patsy said hello.
Dan and Patsy Traylor
Winston-Salem N.C.

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Downtown Beaufort Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Downtown Beaufort Marina

Good News from Leland Oil Co. Marina – McClellanville, SC (St. M. 430) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 07-17-2012

On the Water Guidebooks

Leland Oil Co. Marina

Here’s another excellent report from our strategic partners, Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, owners and originator of On The Water Chart Guides. This article concerns Leland Oil Company Marina, located on the waters of Jeremy Creek at McClellanville, SC. This facility lies about half-way between Winyah Bay and Charleston Harbor.
As has been previously reported here on the Cruisers’ Net, and made clear once again below by Captains Diana and Mark, McClellanville Oil Co. Marina may just be “the” most improved facility in the SC Low Country. Even so, no-one will ever mistake this place for Pier 66, or Morehead City Yacht Basin, BUT with things as they now stand, we can recommend a stop here for those who want to experience a last, little piece of South Carolina Low Country, small town, charm!

T. W. Graham & Co. Seafood Restaurant

Hi Claiborne,
Diana and I were through McClellanville last month and thought you’d like an update on what Dwayne’s up to at Leland Oil.
ICW veterans have long known about the shrimp boat docks at McClellanville, SC (STM 430.0).
In the past, you’d trade beer to raft up for the night In the tiny harbor of Jeremy Creek. But, of course, you’d have to stay up with the shrimpers to drink the beer … and then untangle your boat at oh-dark-thirty so they could get off to work and you could catch a few hours of sleep before moving on.
Now there is a more “civilized” alternative. Last year, Dwayne Merritt at Leland Oil put in floating docks to provide a place for recreational boats to tie up for the night, allowing them to keep their beer … and get some sleep.
We recently stayed at Leland Oil and saw first-hand the new floating docks. Very nice! And Dwayne continues to make this facility more welcoming to cruising sail and power boats.
McClellanville is worth a saunter, a quiet village of well-kept houses clustered on a few blocks near the shrimp docks. With its small streets, lack of traffic, and friendly residents, walking the town feels like going back a few decades.
There is one stop in town, the local seafood restaurant, T.W. Graham. In true small-town style, it has abbreviated hours but is worth the wait. FRESH-FRESH seafood!
Best and see you On the Water,
Captains Mark & Diana Doyle

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Leland Oil Co. Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Leland Oil Co. Marina
www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com

Ladys Island Marina – Captains Mark and Diana Report (Statute Mile 536.5)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 07-12-2012

Recently refinished A, B and C docks

On the Water GuidebooksHere’s another excellent report from our strategic partners, Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, owners and originator of On The Water Chart Guides. This article concerns Ladys Island Marina, located just across the AICW from downtown Beaufort, SC.
This facility has been undergoing a slow and uncertain transition for the last several years. At one time, the owners could not make up their minds whether to keep this place a marina, or turn it into boat-a-miniums. Looks like, at least for the moment, they have opted for the marina route.

Hi folks,
Just wanted to give a shout-out to Claiborne and the SSECN, re: Lady’s Island Marina.
When you’re travelling through Beaufort, SC, consider stopping at Lady’s Island Marina on Factory Creek (STM 535.9).
And if you’re considering cruising to Panama and the San Blas Islands, it just became a must stop—or you’re missing a great resource!
What’s the connection?
The dockmaster at Lady’s Island Marina, Ted Alcorn, and his wife Shari, cruised extensively on their boat s/v Mystique, including four years in the San Blas Islands. During their time there, they were intimately connected with the indigenous community and invited to cultural events rarely attended by outsiders. They’ll generously share their knowledge and pictures of that experience.

Kuna Indian mola

But even if your cruising plans don’t include the San Blas Islands, you’ll still want to view the incredible display of molas (fiber folk art) in the marina office.
We had a great 3-day stay at the marina with its mix of liveaboard and cruising boats. The facility has private shower suites and on-site washer/dryer. Lots of practical services are nearby, including two supermarkets—and of course an assortment of restaurants, pharmacies, auto parts, paint and liquor stores, etc.
We didn’t have a chance to eat at The Fillin’ Station, next door to the marina, but we hear the inexpensive steak specials on Friday night are to die for.
Next time!
Best and see you On the Water,
Captains Mark & Diana Doyle
http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Ladys Island Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Ladys Island Marina

New On-site Restaurant Now Open at Dolphin Cove Marina, Ashley River, Charleston, SC

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 07-11-2012

Dolphin Cove MarinaDolphin Cove Marina – A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR! – overlooks the Ashley River’s eastern shores north of unlighted daybeacon #16, northwest of the charted “R TR”. To reach this facility from the AICW’s run through lower Ashley River, your vessel must pass through/under the Ashley River Memorial/US 17 twin bridges.
Dolphin Cove is sometimes overlooked by cruisers who opt for the Charleston City Marina or, on the Cooper River side of Charleston, the Charleston Martime Center or Charleston Harbor Marina.
And, there is certainly nothing wrong with that plan of action. After all, both Charleston Harbor Marina and Charleston City Marina are SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSORS!
However, if you seek a quieter, lower energy setting to coil your lines, consider Dolphin Cove, farther upstream on Cooper River. To access the principal Charleston historic and business districts, you will need a rental car, or a taxi ride, but now Dolphin Cove offers an on-site dining option, as you will discover below. PLEASE give the HydeOut a try, and tell everyone the SSECN sent you!!!

Subject: We have a bigger dock! Restaurant now open!
Cruising News:
The HydeOut (843-745-0426) at Dolphin Cove Marina is now open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week! See our website at www.hydeout-charleston.com for more information. We have 22 dedicated boatslips for your use to enjoy your dining experience.
Jennifer Carter

The shrimp sandwich is amazing! And you’ll love the fried green tomato sandwich if you like something lighter. Either way, the service is great, the food is fine and the setting is sublime. The whole family enjoyed it so much that we’ll be returning tonight (second time this week).
Paula

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Dolphin Cove Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Dolphin Cove Marina

ARGUS Confirms Shoaling on AICW Problem Stretch – AICW Channel South of McClellanville, SC to Awendaw Creek (St. M. 430 to 435)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 07-09-2012

Perhaps the #1 advantage of being Survice Enginnering’s ARGUS Project’s strategic web partner, is that the SSECN is the FIRST to receive shallow water updates from the various ARGUS volunteer research vessels traveling Southeastern USA coastal waters. And, that’s just what’s happened here!

Now, it isn’t exactly a surprise that the ARGUS equipment aboard M/V Elixir has just reported finding less than optimum depths along the path of the AICW south of McClellanville, South Carolina. After all, the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net declared these waters as an “AICW Problem Stretch” several years ago! However, it’s certainly nice for ARGUS to verify this data, and even to pin-point the shallowest spots!

Take a look at the first graphic below, and note the color coded ARGUS “solution sets” along the track of the AICW immediately southwest of marker #37. This stretch of the AICW lies just southwest of Jeremy Creek and McClellanville. As you can see, Elixir discovered some 6-foot MLW depths right along the mid-width of the AICW channel. Still enough for most vessels, but definitely getting on the thin side:

And, then we have a second set of ARGUS soundings (“solution sets”) depicted in the graphic below, just a small hop farther to the southwest (northeast of marker #40). Again, LOTS of 6-foot MLW depths noted here:

PLEASE NOTE that these depths (“solution sets”) are so NEW, they are NOT yet depicted on the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net Chart View “ARGUS Layer.” That will be corrected on our next update from Survice Engineering, due to be received soon. However, we thought this data was so interesting, it was worth calling to the attention of the cruising community even before this update is received and processed!

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the AICW Channel South of McClellanville, SC to Awendaw Creek

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Shoaling MAY No Longer Be An Issue At the AICW/Little River Inlet/Calabash Creek Intersection (Statute Mile 342)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 07-06-2012

The shoaling reported earlier at the three way intersection of the AICW, Little River Inlet and Calabash Creek seems to have abated. Captain Bell offers good advice concerning the markers through this area.

At the border of North And South Carolina, Heading North, We passed R4 and R2 right on the magenta line provided by Navionics on our chart plotter. After passing R2 we began to favor the outside or green side of the turn heading north. We were at .25′ of tide and did not see less than 11′ of water. Not a problem area.
David Bell

We transit this area almost daily and have had no troubles. The 2 casino boats that turn at this intersection leaving and returning from Little River Inlet have probably helped to keep the area clear of any shoaling. They draw around 8-9′.
Capt. John Schwab

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of This Intersection

Accessing Dolphin Cove Marina on the Ashley River (off the AICW, Charleston, SC)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-26-2012

Dolphin Cove MarinaDolphin Cove Marina, A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!, overlooks the Ashley River’s eastern shores north of unlighted daybeacon #16, northwest of the charted “R TR”. To reach this facility from the AICW’s run through lower Ashley River, your vessel must pass through/under the Ashley River Memorial/US 17 twin bridges.
Local captains who regularly use these spans say that “14ft air draft” is worst case scenario at the highest spring tide. With a tidal range of almost 8ft, it’s possible to have 20ft+ at the center of the arched spans. NOTE that the twin spans in question open on demand except during morning and afternoon peak drive times.

re: “You need to clear a 14 ft air draft to get up river as they do not want to open the two Old Draw Bridges.” [Earlier comment on accessing Dolphin Cove Marina]

Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters
CHAPTER I: COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
SUBCHAPTER J: BRIDGES
PART 117: DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS
Subpart B: Specific Requirements: South Carolina
117.915 – Ashley River.
(a) The draws of the US17 highway bridges, miles 2.4 and 2.5 at Charleston, shall open on signal; except that, from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Monday through Friday and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily, the draws need be opened only if at least 12 hours notice is given. The draws of either bridge shall open as soon as possible for the passage of vessels in an emergency involving danger to life or property.
Ron Widman

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Dolphin Cove Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Dolphin Cove Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Ashley River Memorial Bridge

Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway vs East Coast Offshore Passage

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-25-2012

This discussion deals with the choice all of us have made and Captain Fendel asks some good questions of those of you have made the choice.

I’ve never been to coastal Florida and never boated it. I’m exploring loop-capable boats and have found one that is very seaworthy and could handle pretty much anything “outside” would throw at it short of serious storms, but I also know that some parts of the ICW are pretty and some are just pretty congested. From those who know, may I ask this question: IF you had to pick sections to go “outside” vs. “inside” and/or dont-miss sections of the inside, which areas would you go which way past? I’ll also mention that we think pretty/interesting houses and architecture are “scenic” as well as nature spots. SO….suggestions, experienced ICW-ers? Thanks!
Dan Fendel

We stay inside all the way from the Chesapeake to the keys. As ex sailors we do not like the motion of serendipity offshore. But the big reason is that we like seeing all of the houses and shoreline residences of the ICW. Southern Florida has some of the most ostentatious houses. If you are in to the architecture it is really worth seeing. Carole had fun counting the columns (that we could see) on the houses as we passed by. One had 42 columns!
The drawback is bridges. We did not find many we could not get under as Seredipity only has a 17′ air draft. We are also not in any hurry and found it to be be a pleasant trip through the canal section. Yes there can be lots of boats and yes there are some muscle boats (heads?) that fly through there. But think of the pleasure you will get when you pass them as they are getting a ticket from the marine police. If you do go outside use only class “A” inlets. The smaller inlets in Florida are tricky and can be very dangerous. Have fun, take your time and stay safe.
Mitch & Carole on Serendipity in Norfolk

There are pluses to both the inside and outside, You will probably find You will like a mixture of both. We did some on the inside going down and then did the same stretch on the outside on the way back. Trying to enjoy both sides of a beautiful stretch of water. The weekends would be the worse time to travel on the inside, because of the increased traffic. But there is so much to do and see…..You won’t be able to see it all with one trip…..so just enjoy and plan to return often. We did skip the Great state of Georgia, and we like running the outside from either Beaufort or Charleston to St Marys inlet, mainly because of so much switch backing through Ga. But even though there is lots to see along the inside, The outside has much to see too…….the large schools of bottle nose dolphins, the flying fish, the Deep Deep blue water…..the sky lites up like Christmas at nite, and the rocking and rolling of the sea, and the feeling of being all alone(well You and Your mate) and imagining You are one of the first explorers and seeing through there eyes. Many do stay to the inside around Hatteras, it’s not called the grave yard of the alantic for no reason. Enjoy Your trip, plan as much time for it as You can, there will be spots that You will stop for just a nite and find Yourself finally leaving 1/2 a month or so later, just because You will enjoy it so much. Those spots differ for all of us, but no doubt You will find Yours! You will hear about places that are not boater friendly, we passed through a lot of those places and did not find the same, not that we were any different or any different of a boat, but sometimes a little common sense, and choosing an anchorage that isn’t always right in the middle of someone elses view that they paid millions for and treating others the way we would want to be treated, goes a long ways. So, it’s like a sailor once told me, most of us tell tales, and each time we add a little bit to it, it’s Your job to figure out whats truth and what’s tale, good luck with that. And enjoy all the good tales, both the ones heard and the ones told!
Clay & Mary S/V Gemini

Do it according to the weather. When the winds are favorable offshore runs can be pleasant and quick–when the weather is against you, the inside is the way to go. Use only the major all-weather inlets and you will be happier. Having said that, my very favorite stretch, which I always do on the inside, is Mile 0 to 205, from Norfolk down to Beaufort. I also consider Charleston, Beaufort, SC, and Cumberland Island to be must-see places, but there are many other wonderful areas.
John Kettlewell

John is a noted maritime author and experienced cruiser:
http://www.amazon.com/Intracoastal-Waterway-Norfolk-Miami-Complete/dp/0071623760/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266433541&sr=8-1

Important – Foul Bottom on Wimbee Creek Anchorage, near AICW Statute Mile 523, 6/18/12

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 06-18-2012

After following the mostly sheltered waters of the AICW running south from Charleston, while cruising to Beaufort, South Carolina, cruisers might well be excused when they exit the southwesterly entrance of the Ashepoo – Coosaw Cutoff, for gasping just a bit at the wide swath of open waters which spread out before them. This mighty body of water is the Coosaw River, which the AICW follows mostly west to the northern entrance of Brickyard Creek (thence south to Beaufort).
Our very good friends, Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, have obviously explored these waters themselves over the past couple of decades while researching their superb “Managing the Waterway” series of guide books.
As you will read below, one stream where they had dropped the hook before was Wimbee Creek. This stream cuts off from the Bull River, which itself makes into the Coosaw’s northern flank near Statute Mile 521 (see chart to the above right). HOWEVER A VERY DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE GREETED OUR EXPERIENCED CRUISING DUO ON THIS OCCASION!
As you will read below, Diana and Mark discovered the hard way that a portion of Wimbee Creek has a very foul bottom. Farther upstream (see below), it’s apparently safe (or at least “safer”) to drop the hook, but the creek’s waters, southeast of charted “Chisolm,” where chart 11518 shows a sounding of “11″ feet, are definitely off limits!
The SSECN is declaring a Navigational Alert for these waters!

Hi Claiborne,
On June 10, 2012, we anchored in Wimbee Creek, a popular anchorage off Bull River, running north of the Coosaw River in South Carolina. In 13 feet (MLLW) we deployed a Bruce anchor with 120′ of chain, compensating for the expected additional 7 feet of tide in this area. Like nearly all our surveyed anchorages in Georgia and southern South Carolina, we anticipated high current.
Unfortunately, within a few hours our ground tackle started behaving abnormally. At first we attributed it to opposing wind and current, but it was soon apparent something more serious and unusual was occurring.
The wind continued to climb and thunderstorms could be seen advancing so we decided to retrieve the anchor and re-set. We were stopped short at about 60 feet of chain—in 13 feet of water—stuck on something so large that any attempts by the windlass or by “running over” the anchor merely pulled our bow down!
We were stuck, short-scoped, with strong thunderstorm activity predicted throughout the night, but with no choice but to wait for TowboatU.S. to bring a diver the next morning.
We payed back out the recovered 60 feet of chain and spent an uncomfortable night.
Roy Stegall, a cruiser on s/v Gideon who works part-time for TowboatU.S. Port Royal, and Gene Clark, an experienced diver, arrived on the scene at 0745 hrs. the next morning. It took Gene a couple of hours of blind handwork in the tannic, murky high current to get control of the situation.
His report from down-under: A wide area of huge “rocks”—which we later determined were likely dumped construction debris from an old foundation—covered the mud bottom. Some of the chunks were half the size of the TowBoatU.S. vessel! As the strong winds and currents continuously shifted, our chain had actually been pulled UNDER one of these huge boulders, requiring a rolling hitch and hard horizontal yank using the TowBoatU.S. vessel to pop it free.
This was no ordinary anchor-fouling. The anchor was free and about 20 feet from the boulder. This was a chain-fouling!
A resident yelled out from his dock that a nearby trawler, anchored further up the creek on what looked like a back-up nylon rode, had just lost its anchor and chain in the same area and was waiting to try to locate it.
So this area is a serious hazard and has claimed at least two boats.
The problem site is south of the center of Wimbee Creek, off the second residential dock. Do not anchor anywhere near the first through third docks. Instead, proceed further up the creek, and stay well off the shore.
The chartlet below shows our new anchored position, the fouled area, and the depths (and tides) we read thoughout this anchorage.
Our heartfelt thanks to the excellent team at TowBoatU.S. Port Royal for safely turning around what could have been an even worse situation!
Best and see you On the Water,
Captains Mark & Diana Doyle
http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com

Not To Be Used For Navigation

 

Did I luck out! Two years ago, I anchored in that exact same spot (well, obviously, not exactly the same; I’d still be there).
Donovan

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To A “Navigation Alert” Position on Wimbee Creek, Southeast of Chisolm

Review of Charleston Maritime Center (Cooper River) and Charleston City Marina, AICW Statute Mile 469, Charleston, SC,

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-14-2012

Having spent the last five years as a “full-time cruiser” at Charleston City Marina, A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, I am naturally biased in its favor. While the Charleston Maritime Center does have a great location, the current that Capt. Laudermilch mentions, as well as the wakes of passing boats, make the Maritime Center a poor choice for a long-term stay.

We spent the winter this year at the Charleston City Marina (Megadock) and were very pleased with it. I would not go in to the Maritime Center on the Cooper River or the City Marina on the Ashley side at other than slack tide if I didn’t have to. The current can be quite swift in either. Lots of folks love the Maritime Center for its proximity to the Harris Teeter, the hardware store, and the dog park. It is also a shorter walk to the main part of town. We like the City Marina much better for a variety of reasons – the docks and the bath facilities, the friendly and helpful staff, the van which takes people downtown every hour on the hour and to West Marine (and an adjacent Harris Teeter) every day at 11:30 AM. The pumpout boat come to your boat pretty much on demand for $5. The dockage prices aren’t
> that much higher than the Maritime Center, but the fuel prices aren’t cheap by any means. If you make a reservation ask to be on M dock near the bath house if possible. This shortens the walk to the parking lot. If you get at the end of the Megadock your shoes will get lots of wear during your stay. Good luck!
PS- If at all possible, time docking at Charleston Marine Center on or near slack. The current can make things exciting. Ask the guys there when it [slack tide] is when you call them for a slip, they’ll help you out.
Jim Laudermilch
48 Hatteras motoryacht “Snail’s Pace”

Have stayed at the Maritime Center marina 3 times, most recently June, 2012. It is my preferred marina in Charleston for the berthing rate and the great location for both groceries (H-T) and restaurants (many). The freighter and Navy traffic in the Cooper River can send a surge into the marina, but power boat wakes on the Ashley River can do the same for the marinas on that side of town.
The marina has recently upgraded the free laundromat to two machine sets, so it is possible to get a complete laundry done in a reasonable amount of time.
For me the only drawback to the marina is the limited number of slips, especially those for boats over 40′. The last two time I was at the marina I had to tie my 42′ sailboat to a 30′ floating dock. That’s not really a problem for me with a mid-ships lifeline gate. Boats with the gate further aft will want to back into one of these slips. If you are not comfortable tying to a 30′ dock, then make a reservation on one of the 40′ docks.
My recommendation is to stay at the Maritime Center if you are going to spend some time in Charleston. If you are just stopping for a night on a forced march up or down the ICW, then by all means use the Ashley River marinas as they are much more convenient.
John

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Charleston Maritime Center

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Charleston Maritime Center

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Charleston City Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Charleston City Marina

Question and Answers re AT&T 4G Signal Strength along the East Coast

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-12-2012

If you are an AT&T 4G subscriber, please give Capt. Wink some input as to signal strength along the coast. Please respond by commenting on this posting. Thank you!

Cruising News:
In October I’ll be making the trip from Beaufort NC to Stuart FL and I’m interested in the AT&T 4G signal strength along the AICW in this area? Gotta keep up on the SSCN latest news.
Capt. Wink

We use it all the way from Georgia and strength is great! Two IPhones work well everywhere!
Bob Cardwell

We used the Verizon 4G Mi-Fi coupled with an I-pad last year going from New Bern to Stuart and return. We found that 4-G coverage is not continuous, but when the 4-G is not available, 3-G is. Basicly, if you can get a cellphone signal you have internet access. We used it for e-mail and to visualize weather forecasts/weather radar, and to plan the next days travel using Inavx and Cruisers Net and the chartbooks. We picked up a mooring ball at Sunset Bay and used the 4-G on board. Sometimes carried the I-pad ashore and used the marinas server. We found our Mi-Fi to be more reliable and faster than the marina’s due to heavier traffic on the marina’s server.
Steve Kamp S/V Carolina

Sorry we had Verizon but we had good signal from Norfolk to Marathon, including 20 miles off shore off the coast of Georgia which was very surprising, I am sure we were near the edge there, but we still had voice signal, Data was spotty at that distance off shore……but inland we had Data as well. Enjoy Your trip, I would still recommend a working VHF radio, as You will need it for the bridges. And even though the phone worked, I prefer to have back up to back up on communications. We traveled with another slower boat and slowed our trip to stay with him because he developed a leaking impellor pump out there. One never knows what Might happen. He made it in with us just fine. He dropped hook at Fernindina Beach Fl for repairs.
Capt. Clay

Thanks folks
I’ve found that tethering my iPhone to the Mac works really well and in the long run will be the most cost effective for the ten day cruise. Have a good VHF as our primary communication for bridges etc.
Capt. Wink

Socastee Bridge Woes, AICW Statute Mile 371

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-10-2012

Socastee swing bridge opens “on demand” UNLESS water traffic becomes heavy, as on a weekend, then bridge closures may be required every 15 minutes to accommodate road traffic. This is an understandable situation where the tender is responding to “on demand” from both boaters and drivers. Fortunately, this is a quiet section with no adverse currents to affect vessels having to circle or anchor.
HOWEVER, all of us here at the SSECN share Orient Moon’s mystification as to why the state of South Carolina spent many millions of dollars to construct a high-rise span, and then left, the old, decrepit swing bridge in place. You must have to be a politician to understand!

This bridge is a pain, you never know what to expect. They built a new high rise bridge next to it so I don’t understand why they cannot abide to their on demand status.
Orient Moon

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Directory Listing For Socastee Bridge

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More Good Words for Osprey Marina, AICW Statute Mile 373

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-05-2012

Osprey Marina , owned by Carson Benton, is at mile marker 373 on the Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach. Osprey Marina offers a protected harbor 150 yards off the waterway accessible by a private dOsprey Marina lies at the southern foot of AICW section known officially as the Pine Island Cut (a. k. a. “the Rock Pile”), just as the Waterway sweeps south into beautiful Waccamaw River. Osprey Marina is one of the finest marinas you will ever discover, and these good folks are A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

Stayed the night in late April on our way south to Savannah. I second the great review. Very protected and super staff. Had a great Italian dinner in town with free transportation from the restaurant. Highly recommended stop!
Richard Brown

As of 6/5/2012, the Grill at Osprey Marina is still not open, but as Richard points out, there is an Italian restaurant nearby, Scatori’s (843-650-3370), that will come and pick you up at the marina, and then return you to the docks after dining. Their website is http://www.scatoris.com.

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Osprey Marina

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More Good Words for Bucksport Marina, AICW Statute Mile 377

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 06-05-2012

At Bucksport cruising visitors will discover all new docks, new power pedestals, a newly reopened on-site restaurant, clean – climate controlled showers and laundromat, as well as a warm welcome for the cruising communityMany good words about newly renovated (and under new ownership) Bucksport Marina and their on-site restaurant, continue to be recorded here on the Cruisers’ Net! And, of course, these good people are a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS NET SPONSOR! PLEASE patronize them and all our other sponsors whenever possible!!!!

Glad to see them open yet once again; we were saddened by the appearance of the closed marina last year on our way south. We have been cruising the waterway for many years and have watched them open and close so many times we lost count. We have enjoyed many meals at the restaurant and love the homemade sausage. Bucksport is a quaint, cool and refreshing stop along the ICW.
Cap’n Norman s/v Blown Away

Called this morning [6/5/2012] to ask if they had Conway sausage. The person I spoke to told that they do NOT have it and that he did not know what the problem was. We always used to drop by and purchase more than a few pounds of this delectable sagey Hot and Mild sausage. Haven’t had any for several years.
Betsy Basch

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Directory Listing For Bucksport Marina

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Beaufort SC to Install Mooring Field and Upgrade Downtown Marina Docks, AICW Statute Mile 536.5

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-24-2012

The Downtown Marina Of Beaufort, SC, 1006 Bay Street Beaufort, SC 29902 (843) 524-4422 or Marker #239 on ICWThe Downtown Marina of Beaufort – A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR! – lies north of unlighted daybeacon #239, a short distance west of the Lady’s Island swing bridge, in the heart of beautiful downtown Beaufort, SC. The article below is reprinted from the May 17th Beaufort Tribune.

An improved mooring area in the Beaufort River and upgraded electrical connections will make Beaufort more appealing to visiting boaters through a $100,000 federal grant received by the City of Beaufort and the Downtown Beaufort Marina.
“For boaters who travel up and down the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort will be a much more appealing place to stop for a night or two or three,” Beaufort City Manager Scott Dadson said of the marina upgrades and new mooring field. “For too many years we’ve overlooked this important part of marketing our city to the boating community.”
Work is expected to run from July 1 through December. The U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Services are the federal funding agency for this Boating Infrastructure Grant. Key elements in the project include:
· Installing two step-up transformers to increase the electrical voltage from 208 to 240 volts on the marina’s outermost dock which serves visiting vessels. The improvement will provide better customer service and make the marina more attractive to larger vessels traveling the Intracoastal Waterway
· Installing 16 professionally-managed moorings for transient boats in an approved area of the Beaufort River, in the area already used as the city’s “harbor.” Such mooring space isn’t available between Charleston and St. Augustine, FL. The new moorings will replace the approximately 12 randomly placed anchoring and also will involve removal of dilapidated boats which will improve water quality
· Replacing two existing but rusting electrical disconnect systems at the marina and installing new disconnects in stainless steel housings.
The mooring buoys will either be fabricated by a marine contractor or purchased through a vendor. The most cost effective approach will be the one selected. The buoys will be installed by a licensed marine contractor under the supervision of an engineer, said Libby Anderson, Beaufort’s planning director.
The project is part of the capitalization of the Downtown Marina, which is City-owned but managed by Griffin Enterprises. Capital costs are part of the lease agreement with Griffin Enterprises.
The mooring field and electrical upgrade project received endorsements from the Beaufort Regional Chamber of Commerce, Beaufort Sail & Power Squadron and local boaters.
Because of its location within the historic downtown area and proximity to historic and tourism amenities, the Downtown Marina attracts a significant number of transient boaters. During the spring and fall, the major seasons for transient boaters in South Carolina, the marina typically hosts 10 to 20 boats per night, according to the marina management company.
The Downtown Marina has approximately 1,140 feet of pier devoted to transient boats and can accommodate 38-40 boats of 26’ in length. Currently, there are no mooring facilities in the Beaufort area.
Transient boats desiring a mooring must either dock at the Marina’s transient piers, if room is available, or continue to 65 miles north to Charleston, or 240 miles south to St. Augustine, Florida. A mooring field with associated professional management will increase the opportunities for boaters moving through the area.
While some boaters prefer moorings, many desire the conveniences offered by dockage at the transient pier. The Downtown Marina falls short is satisfying the electrical needs of large, modern, well-equipped vessels – largely because the electrical service at the marina was installed in the 1970s.
“This grant will help make our marina, and downtown Beaufort, a better choice for boaters as they travel the Intracoastal Waterway. They are a tight-knit community and word spreads fast about marinas with good, or bad, service,” Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling said.
“When these boaters enjoy our restaurants and shops, when they enjoy our Waterfront Park, we want them to share their experience and to come back frequently. Some of them may even decide to relocate here. This is another investment in our future,” he said.
Submitted by John C. Williams, APR, City of Beaufort.

Please note that there is also a mooring field in Fernandina Beach, which is closer than St. Augustine.
Paula Spence
M/Y Sea Eagle

I prefer anchoring. I have excellent, well maintained gear and I am very professional in how I use it.
I may as well sell it all, the way things are going…anchoring will be about as useful as knowing how to use a sextant on the ICW – useful only in the most unforeseen emergency.
It seems every municipality has their hands out to take what they can from the transient boaters. Am I the only one getting sick of this?
Wally Moran

Wally from WallyWorld!
Keven R. Quinn

I agree with you Wally,
A key difference is that I’m a fulltime resident here in Beaufort. I pay tax here, State, county and city. I have to pay to park downtown, what next will the city have a walking tax for foot traffic in the city limits? I have been sailing for quite some time. I had rather anchor out over a paid slip. The ICW should not be fare game for any city or county to levy tax in the name of whatever they want to in the betterment of the community. Bill the viewer of the great esthetic view our sailboats give, Hell you don’t tax the painter you charge the art center participant, right? Do you really think all sailors are rich? Most of us gave up the rat race in life to get away from this kind on force. Most of us spent all of our money on the vessel and good ground tackle so we could anchor out and hold well to the bottom as we go to town and spend our money in your towns. Early estimates I read in the Beaufort Gazette were as much as $200 a week. The average “hook sailors” annual budget is only $15 to $18,000 a year. You put another $2500.00? Add 10% to your budget all at once. Can you still have the car payment? The trip to the mountains? The river is not yours Beaufort, its ours.
Good day, Cpt. Curt

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Downtown Marina of Beaufort

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Good Words for Osprey Marina, AICW Statute Mile 373

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-20-2012

Osprey Marina , owned by Carson Benton, is at mile marker 373 on the Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach. Osprey Marina offers a protected harbor 150 yards off the waterway accessible by a private dOsprey Marina lies at the southern foot of AICW section known officially as the Pine Island Cut (a. k. a. “the Rock Pile”), just as the Waterway sweeps south into beautiful Waccamaw River. Osprey Marina is one of the finest marinas you will ever discover, and these good folks are A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

We visited Osprey earlier this week (17th May 2012) on our 50′ Beneteau, with a 6′ draft in an attempt to avoid some nasty storms. What a great place, a real hidden gem! Great surrounding, helpful staff, including driving us into town to refill our propane tank. The marina is clean and well cared for. We will be back.
Andrew

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Osprey Marina

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Continued Praise for Leland Oil Company, McClellanville, SC, AICW Statute Mile 430

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-19-2012

We understand from many sources that Leland Oil Company Marina, under a new owner, is making big improvements, including new floating docks, to this very affordable facility – long a source of good fuel prices. We hear, too, that the owner will take time to drive you to nearby stores. Also note that if you have never visited the backwater village of McClellanville, SC, you owe it to yourself to stop here and at least take in the community. It’s like stepping into a time machine that transports you to what most of the Low Country must have looked like 50 years ago. Try it, you might just like it!

We haven’t been there since Leland Oil Company began the renovation. Jeremy Creek was being dredged during our last visit, and we were extremely happy with the rumor
that there was a possibility of a dock in progress. We own six acres on Drayton Lane, immediately across from ‘Gussie’s’ house, and the church which is on the grounds of the slave cemetery. (This church was turned on its foundation during Hurricane Hugo in 1989) McClellanville is on the Historic Registry for those who may not be aware; and the two restaurants in our small little town can compete with any 5 Star restaurant around. Plus, the seating is a lot more comfortable.
We are full-time cruisers and are proud of McClellanville for its citizens caring enough to progress slowly without spoiling its heritage. Since cruisers and McClellanville share a lot in common, we look forward to taking our sv Gypsysails into Jeremy Creek with the first opportunity that prevails.
Thank you Leland Oil Company, we will be sure to share with as many cruisers as we can, because they appreciate communities like ours.
Ginger & Maury Thompson

We stayed at Leland Oil in McClellanville on 16th May 2012 on our 50′ Benetau with a 6′ draft. The entrance to the the creek was a little shallow but no real problem (a foot above low). At the dock during a normal low tide we still had 6″ on the bottom. Plenty of space on the new dock easy tie up and departure. The fishing boats all respected the no wake which made for a very pleasant quiet nights sleep, we will visit again.
Andrew

Click Here To View the South Carolina Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Leland Oil Company

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Entrance to McClellanville Channel

Another Good Experience at Bucksport Marina, AICW Statute Mile 377

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-18-2012

At Bucksport cruising visitors will discover all new docks, new power pedestals, a newly reopened on-site restaurant, clean – climate controlled showers and laundromat, as well as a warm welcome for the cruising communityGood words about newly renovated (and under new ownership) Bucksport Marina and their on-site restaurant, continue to be recorded here on the Cruisers’ Net! Well, of course, these good people are a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS NET SPONSOR! PLEASE patronize them and all our other sponsors whenever possible!!!!

We stayed at Bucksport on 4-5 and had a great time. Ralph sang all night and really did a great job entertaining us. We were the only boaters eating that night along with a couple other locals. It was the best time Sarah and I had had in a very long time. Food was great and very reasonable. Don’t pass this up on your way north or south. Its well worth an extra day devoted to the grand strand. Very pup friendly. Can’t say enough good things. Ralph and his wife treated us like family. See you soon.
John/Sarah Beaver
Forget About It 3.

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Directory Listing For Bucksport Marina

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Detailed Report on AICW/Ashepoo Coosaw Cutoff Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 515)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-18-2012

Earlier reports have indicated depths of 5.8 feet at dead low in this perennial “AICW Problem Stretch” south of Charleston, SC.

Abeam of “186″ at 1137 and followed the magenta line around to abeam “185″, entrance to the Ashepoo-Coosaw cutoff, and depth dropped to as low as 8.1′, then bounced between 8.1′ to 8.5′ abeam of “184″. Low tide prediction: 1339, +0.14′-probably have at least 6′, + or -, at LT. Dredging would help.
Michael J. Horowitz aboard ALTAIR

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Ashepoo/Coosaw Cutoff

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Photos of Leland Oil Company’s New Floating Docks (McClellanville, South Carolina – AICW, Statute Mile 430)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 05-15-2012

Back in April (2012), we published several reports from fellow cruisers detailing the very welcome new, floating docks at McClellanville, South Carolina’s Leland Oil Company (see http://cruisersnet.net/?p=81422 and http://cruisersnet.net/?p=85795). I had always wanted to recommend stopping in McClellanville, as this idyllic village is a real throwback to yesteryear, with its moss shrouded lanes, and quaint homes that look as if they just stepped out of the early 1900′s. However, until these new docks were added, the roughness of Leland Oil Company’s dockage facilities were a real trade-off against the community’s other charms. Now, while no-one will ever mistake this facility for Fort Lauderdale’s “Pier 66,” we can recommend a stop here!
Just a few minutes ago, the dockmaster at Leland Oil Company transmitted a series of photos detailing his new docks, You can see one to the right. Follow the photo gallery link below to check out the rest!