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Archive For: Georgia – News4 – Jekyll Creek to St. Marys River

  • Report from Cumberland Dividings AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    Captain Butler offers good advice for the Waterway channel near the southern tip of the “Cumberland Dividings,” just north of where the AICW intersects the southerly reaches of the Brickhill River. This “AICW Problem Stretch” has multiple problems. First, some charts and chartplotters show the magenta fairway line running on the western side of the red markers in this area. Those who blindly follow this erroneous magenta line will run aground every time. Also, and perhaps even worse, the Waterway is shoaling badly along its western flank, north of marker #63.

    Channel is well marked, looks like new markers were installed. Definitely follow the markers and not the magenta line on the charts.
    Karen Butler

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Chartlet Below To Open A Chart View Windows Zoomed to the Location of This AICW Problem Stretch”

  • Another View from Jekyll Creek/AICW Problem Stretch, AICW Statute Mile 683

    Click for Chartview

    Jeykyll Harbor Marina... a Cool Place to Beat the HeatThe AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is recommended. Sonny provides us with another perspective on this very shallow creek.

    I am going to disagree with everyone. The creek at Jekyll is tricky but if you follow the channel, look at a sat or google earth view and you will see it! Not the magenta line.
    We have several barges come through each week at differing tides and they draw 8 ft. I have a picture of the barge going through the bridge at Jekyll Harbor Marina at low tide with a draft of 8 ft.

    Yes there is some shoaling at G19 and St. Andrews sound but we go out and in with our 4 ft draft fine at low tide. Boat US will advise you also to stay in the channel! They say the people that get in trouble are out of the channel.
    I hope this helps.
    I want cruisers to know that the ICW passage here is safe and passable if they are aware and careful. Jekyll Island is a very nice place to visit or stay as they transit the ICW heading south for the winter.
    Sonny, Jekyll Harbor Marina

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • More on Avoiding Marker #32 in St. Andrew Sound, AICW Statute Mile 690

    Captain Healey’s excellent description of his passages through St. Andrew Sound has been prompted by the lengthy discussion (see referenced link below) of the Waterway’s dogleg turn at Marker #32 and he offers an alternative route to avoid Marker #32 where the water can get very rough because of its proximity to the open ocean.

    Hi Claiborne,

    Reference: SSECN link: http://cruisersnet.net/important-markercharting-confusion-and-increased-shoaling-on-aicws-passage-through-georgias-st-andrew-sound-st-m-690/, dated August, 2012.

    I guess I missed this discussion when it was hot. At the risk of “getting myself in trouble,” I confess that I do not go east as far as R”32″ when we transit the area of St. Andrews Sound. Instead, we skirt the eastern end of the charted shoal that extends westward from the mouth of the Satilla River towards the inlet. That shoal is labeled “Horseshoe Shoal” on the chart. I know my path is off the charted magenta line, but as we all know, the magenta line is only a guide, and often wrong as waterways have changed since it was first created.

    I have attached two screen shots (Vector and Raster chart views from Coastal Explorer). The screen shots show both our “preferred route” (black line) and 4 of our tracks (light red lines) as recorded over the past several years. The tracks are dated: 4/23/ 2008, 5/16/2009, 11/9/2011 and 4/24/2012. In settled conditions, we go out at Doboy Sound and come back in at Fernandina or Jacksonville. That skips a lot of Georgia shallow water, and it’s easy-out, easy-in. That’s why there are some migrations that don’t show tracks.

    To my personal knowledge, the depth of the “shortcut” that I’ve shown has been stable over at least the last 5 years, and generally carries 3′ – 4′ more water than charted, adjusted for tidal range at the time of our passage. We have transited that route at several tide stages, and I’ve never had occasion to worry about depth. We draw 4-1/4 ft, and have never seen less than 7.5′-8′ in that area. My one concern would be if seas were up from the east. In 2′ – 3′ seas, at low tide, I’d just swing a little farther east around the tail of Horseshoe Shoal. Or, take the route through Floyd’s Creek. In any case, it “is not* necessary to go out to R”32” before turning south to the ICW off Cumberland Island.

    I am not advocating or encouraging others to do what I do. Every captain has to decide what’s right for them. But, this is what I have done and it has worked well for us. We’ll be headed south in another 3-4 weeks. I will let you know what we find.

    Hope all is well! Jim

    Peg and Jim Healy aboard Sanctuary
    Currently at Rock Creek, Pasadena, MD
    Monk 36 Hull #132
    MMSI #367042570
    AGLCA #3767
    MTOA #3436

    St. Andrew Sound - Click for Chartview

  • New Manager at Jekyll Harbor Marina, AICW Statute Mile 684.5

    Jeykyll Harbor Marina... a Cool Place to Beat the HeatJekyll Harbor Marina lies along the easterly banks of the AICW’s passage through Jekyll Creek, immediately south of the 65-foot fixed bridge. These good folks are a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, and one heck of a friendly stop!

    Cruising News:
    New manager @ Jekyll Harbor Marina. Scott Todd has assumed the position of Marina Manager and is determined to deliver the best service on the ICW. The marina is looking forward to many improvements and updates as Scott and his team work hard to make JHM the place to be. Jekyll Harbor Marina is a Clean Marina and will welcome transients and long term boaters. Enjoy the nice weather and a safe harbor this winter as you travel the ICW.
    Sonny Reeves

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Jekyll Harbor Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Jekyll Harbor Marina

  • Good Repair Yard Discovered in Southern Georgia (off St. Marys River, on North River, near St. M. 712)

    Now, here’s a note from a satisfied customer of a boatyard (St. Marys Boat Service) that I’ve somehow managed to miss knowing about for the past 30+ years. After seeing Captain Sipe’s note below, which originally appeared on the T&T (Trawlers and Trawlering) mail list, I e-mailed and asked for more specific data on this yard’s location. Captain Sipe promptly replied, and placed this position at 30 44.628 North/081 31.518 West, on the eastern shores of North River, north of the pulp and paper mill overlooking the western banks. North River itself runs off St. Marys River, a short hop east of the like named village.
    Sounds like this place may be a good one to know about!

    Just a note . . . about my experience at St. Mary’s Boat Service.
    I made the run from Brunswick Landing Marina to St. Mary’s after spending 3 months at BLM to have Maerin hauled to replace the transmission coupling, do the bottom and buff the hull. I had visited SMBS [St. Marys Boat Service] in June to look into having the haulout done when I completed my project on a 46 GB Classic at BLM. Rocky, the manager told me to get in touch about 2 weeks prior to my anticipated arrival to arrange for a date. He was most helpful in accommodating my needs, and although he was at capacity, made room for me and assured me he’d be able to help me out. He was as good as his word, and I arrived in the morning on a high tide. The North River is fine for my 5 ft draft but can be a bit skinny at low tide, and the haulout well is nearly dry at low. I arrived just after the high, and tied up on the end of the well. He had originally planned to haul me late in the day, but hustled some boats around to get me hauled shortly after my arrival.
    The whole experience was outstanding. The care with which they handle the boat was impressive. I was hauled, pressure washed and blocked by 2PM. They require dust collection for sanding, and they provide a portable dust collector and sander with sanding discs for DIY use,
    included in the cost of the haulout. I needed some help with tools for the coupler replacement, namely a jack and blocking. Rocky provided a porta-power with different attachments, and told me if I needed some manpower I needed only ask.
    I was there for 10 days, and completed all the work I set out to accomplish. There are a few sets of Biljack scaffolds available which I utilized for buffing the hull, and when all was completed, he made sure he was ready to get me back in the water promptly, today- Sunday! In addition, I needed to return my rental car to JAX, so he followed me to the airport and brought me back to the yard. Wouldn’t let me pay for his fuel for the trip.
    All in all, I’d heartily recommend the yard for anyone needing a place to haul and do their own work, or have them do it. They have 2 travel lifts, the largest is 50 ton. The haulout well is about 19 ft wide, and about 12 ft at high tide. Rocky says they can do about 65 ft. length. Customer service is the objective there, and I don’t know what I’d have changed to improve the experience I had, other than perhaps temps lower than 97 and a little less rain! The cost of the haul and 10 days blocked was less than $1K for my 43 foot boat. Quite reasonable IMO.
    Oh, perhaps the question as to why I ran to St. Mary’s when BLM has a yard with a 50 ton lift? Absolutely no DIY.
    Steve Sipe
    Solo 4303 “Maerin

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of St. Marys Boat Service

  • Reminder of Alternate Route(s) Around Georgia’s St. Andrew Sound, AICW Statute Miles 686 to 696

    Captain Ehlen’s comments and this reminder were prompted by a discussion of markers in St. Andrew Sound, see link below. The alternate route he mentions is the Umbrella Cut Route which takes you northbound from Mile 696 in Cumberland River through Floyd Creek, across the Satilla River and into the Little Satilla to rejoin the AICW at Mile 686 in Jekyll Sound. This is often considered the route of choice when the primary Waterway route, which passes through St. Andrew Sound and almost out into the briny blue, is kicking up. A third option northward would be to turn to starboard (ESE) out of Floyd Cut into the Satilla River and follow the markers northeast, west of Horseshoe Shoal, to rejoin the Waterway east of Raccoon Key Spit. Strong winds out of the southeast across St. Andrew would make this route uncomfortable.

    There’s a second, “alternate” ICW route that heads away from St. Andrew Sound and is shown on the charts. Longer, shallower water (go on a rising tide) but avoids going out towards the ocean in bad conditions.
    There appears to also be a third option, but it isn’t as well buoyed and I don’t know if the charted depths are still correct.
    Wade Ehlen
    MT 36 Shady Lady
    New Bern NC

    Click Here To Read An Ongoing Discussion of St. Andrew Sound

    Click Here To View An Earlier Posting on Umbrella Cut

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Northern End of Umbrella Cut

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Floyd Cut

  • Follow Up on Marker/Charting Confusion and Increased Shoaling on AICW’s Passage Through Georgia’s St. Andrew Sound (St. M. 690)

    Back on 8/10/12, we began a string of messages here on the SSECN about shoaling and marker confusion/problems on the AICW’s passage through often ROUGH St. Andrew Sound, south of Jekyll Creek/Island (see http://cruisersnet.net/?p=94169). We asked for additional input from the cruising community, AND WE GOT IT! This string of messages was featured in our 8/17/12 SSECN Alert, and more of you clicked through to this posting than any other linked in this Alert!
    The real originator of all this important information was my good friend and fellow nautical writer, Captain John Kettlewell. Well, while all this was in progress, John was querying the USCG and the NOAA charting people. With John’s permission, we have reproduced those messages below.

    Hello:
    Can you explain the current positioning of Buoy R32 in St. Andrew Sound, Light List III #37385? On the ICW charts the magenta course line is shown to the west of the buoy; however, it appears to be a starboard side marker for the ICW (headed south). Someone has reported to me that if they leave the R32 to starboard when southbound it puts them right on a shoal, which is charted to the northeast of the buoy on chart #11489 (http://www.charts.noaa.gov/OnLineViewer/11489.shtml ). It appears that both the buoy may be off station and the chart incorrect.
    I am the author of the Intracoastal Waterway Chartbook, and other ICW guides and publications.
    John J. Kettlewell

    Mr. Kettlewell,
    We are checking into your inquiry. It may take a few days as I’ve had to reach out to the field unit.
    Sincerely,
    Lee
    Lee Dragon
    Local Notice to Mariners
    Seventh Coast Guard District
    Aids to Navigation (Dpw)

    Please see the email below from Mr. Kettlewell regarding the magenta line in the ICW St Andrews Sound area chart 11489.
    The buoys are St Andrews Sound Buoy 31A (LLNR 37384) and St Andrews Sound LB 32 (LLNR 37385). The ANT team believes the magenta line to be incorrect and needs to be moved to go between B31A and LB32. It does make for a sharp corner, there is not much room between Horseshoe
    shoal and the North breakers. They continued by saying the area is a just a bad corner and the magenta line needs to be moved to the east of LB32. The sector will engage the ACOE regarding shifting shoals, etc.
    I hope this information helps.
    Lee

    And, Captain Kettlewell’s final word to the SSECN concerning the above message:

    See below [above, in this format – editor]. This doesn’t really answer the question to my satisfaction, but apparently the CG thinks the marked channel is correct.
    JJK

    We transit this route several times a year. Last transit was June of this year heading north to Brunswick. We have a full keel 6ft draft sailing vessel and usually time our passage close to high tide due to transiting Jekyll Creek. We always pass R32 on the east side of the buoy as the CG stated (the Magenta Line is incorrect in the turn). It is a tight turn and particular attention should be paid to the alignment of G 31A and G 31 as you round R 32 keeping it to port (heading north). It is a little unnerving due to the quick depth change (deep to shallow) but there was at least 15 ft of water at high tide in June. Pretty much the same for the past 3 years. Hope this helps.
    Capt. Jesse Price s/v Wind Dust

    Hi;
    We had occasion to pass r32 on 9-6-12 at 7:45 a.m. heading South in a 48’ sailboat drawing 6’ . The buoy is on station according to our gps and it has a square yellow icw marker that’s well hidden from view if a vessel attempts to round it to the East. We passed the buoy by about 75’ to the West as the magenta line suggests and had a minimum of 12’ at low tide.
    No signs of coast guard nor any other government agency.
    Best Regards
    Pete

    I transited from the St Marys to Jekyll Island via the outside (St Andrews Sound) on Labor Day weekend. Many of the buoys are either missing or off position. For example, N2 is missing and 31A is off position and on its side. Local boaters indicate that the buoys become entangled in shrimp shrimp nets and once the are freed they are just left in the new position. Shoaling has occurred to the east of the channel. I found that transiting from the outer marker (C Sta) to the following points provided a safe passage at low water for my 6 ft draft: N30 55.331 W081 20.260, N30 57.095 W081 21.555, N30 57.774 W081 21.864, N30 58.750 W081 22.296, N30 58.846 W081 23.224 then straight for R 32 (staying just to the west of R 32) then proceeding north up the ICW.
    Joe Blanchard

  • Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage (Statute Mile 711.5)

     Just like Captains Mike and Mary (see below), we dearly love the anchorage off Cumberland Island’s so-called, “Sea Camp Dock.” Going ashore and just experiencing the lush, maritime forest, walking to the beach, and exploring the old Carnegie mansions, well, it just doesn’t get any better than this! Don’t miss this anchorage!

    We recently took our trawler, the Patricia Ann, on a 4-day cruise over to Cumberland Island, our favorite anchorage. We wanted to look for the white deer and walk the deserted beaches at dawn. We saw the white deer several years ago…actually we just caught a brief glimpse of them in the distance. Ever since, we have gone in search of white deer! They are not albinos but real white deer.
    We were up at 5 AM each morning as usual; the coffee was just beginning to brew and the aroma was delightful. And just a little while later, with coffee in hand, we watched from the flybridge as the sun began her climb over the horizon. A beautiful day was beginning with not a cloud in the sky.
    As we began our day with showers and breakfast, it dawned on us just how fortunate live-aboard cruisers really are. We can leave the dock for days on end and truly understand the term “freedom” and “independence”.
    Read more of our exploration of this island wilderness………
    http://paradiseyachtsales.blogspot.com/2011/03/trawler-living-aboard-tip-exploration.html
    Mike and Mary Dickens
    Paradise Yachts

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Anchorage Directory Listing For the Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage

  • FORGET THE CHARTS! AICW and Brickhill River (South) Anchorage Breadcrumbs (St. M. 704) – Captains Mark and Diana Report

    On the Water GuidebooksSalty Southeast Cruisers’ Net strategic partners, Captains Mark and Diana Doyle, owners and founder of On The Water ChartGuides (http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com) share another fascinating excerpt from their very soon to be released two volume AICW Anchorage Guide series.
    Before going any further, PLEASE NOTE THAT THE DOYLES ARE OFFERING A PRE-RELEASE 42% DISCOUNT ON THEIR NEW ANCHORAGE GUIDES. THAT SPECIAL OFFER ENDS TOMORROW, 8/10/12. ALL INTERESTED CRUISERS SHOULD FOLLOW THE LINK ABOVE WITHOUT DELAY!
    Back to the article below – Diana and Mark take a good look at the anchorage found on southern Brickhill River, hard by the Cumberland Island National National Park.
    The “dynamic duo” also bring to light some critical info on the Cumberland Narrows “AICW Problem Stretch” (see http://www.CruisersNet.net/aicw-channel-through-cumberland-dividings). Note the AICW soundings on the included excerpt page from their Anchorage Guide below, and how these show the good depths lie on the EAST side of the markers at the intersection of the Waterway and southern Brickhill River, far from the magenta line!

    Hi Claiborne,
    We all accept that paper and electronic charts are notoriously inaccurate. All too often, charted navaid positions and the ICW’s Magenta Line do not correspond at all to the real world.
    Just look at how the ICW is charted to the WEST of the red navaids off Brickhill River’s southern entrance. Ouch!
    Cruisers hear that Brickhill River is “mis-charted” and has a “really shallow entrance” … but, “once inside, has excellent depths.”
    What does that really mean? Do you just “feel your way in” and hope for the best? That might turn out to be a disaster and is almost certainly not worth the stress. So you pass on the anchorage and move on.
    But wait! Brickhill River is a real gem of an anchorage, particularly for active boaters who enjoy hiking in national parks.
    Thus Brickhill River (South) anchorage turns out to be one of the better examples of the value of our new AnchorGuides with their digital breadcrumb tracks.
    Look at the depth-annotated survey track on the page [below]. You can see the entrance surveyed as low as 10 feet (at 7.0 feet above MLLW) along the southern shore. The northern shore had much more water, with depths consistently in the teens. Now the “shallow entrance” anecdotal report can be confirmed and visualized as an extension of shoaling from the southern bank, with a natural channel running along the northern bank.
    And now you can see the true ICW path, EAST of the red navaids, right over the non-existent “mis-charted” shoal and island!
    Once you’re safely in Brickhill River, you’ll enjoy a beautiful anchorage with all-around protection off Cumberland Island National Park. Cumberland Island is one of the largest undeveloped barrier islands along the Atlantic coast, home to a national seashore and one of the largest maritime forests in the U.S.
    You can access the national park at a small park dock or adjacent tiny beach, both for a nominal day-use fee. Nearby shore amenities include picnic tables, trails, and restrooms.
    For a hi-res detailed map of the island, visit http://1.usa.gov/NZMHsW
    Brickhill River (South) anchorage is located just off “Plum Orchard” on the map.
    Best and see you On the Water,
    Captains Mark & Diana Doyle
    http://www.OnTheWaterChartGuides.com

    Click Here To View the Georgia Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For the Brickhill River Southern Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Brickhill River Southern Anchorage

  • Update on Pascal’s Report on AICW Problem Stretch Channel Through Cumberland Dividings (Statute Mile 704)

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway. Shoaling and mischarting of the magenta fairway line reder this section of the AICW a REAL problem. Be sure to follow the link below to these water’s listing in our “AICW Problem Stretches Directory” to learn more!

    While some tide is nice, I no longer bother passing thru here at high tide as there is plenty of water on the green side. northbound, favor the greens south of the bend then keep going almost as if you’re going into that creek on the NE side. Stay close to the shore line in the turn then come back towards the center after G59A north of the turn. Well over 15′ MLW all the way. No reason to run aground here!
    Pascal aboard MY Charmer, 70′ 6+ draft

    Came through here today (June 12, 2012) at 11:30 AM which was 1.5 hrs past low tide.
    Follow Pascal”s instructions and you will find plenty off water. Lowest reading we observed was 11.4 ft. using his directions.
    Bob Poovey

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Section” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Another Report on Depths in Jekyll Creek, AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 683

    This AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is still recommended.

    Passing through Jekyll Creek now. This is the area that has had some skinny water. Have HT at 1848, +07.2′. From the bridge to the Jekyll Island Club dock, on the green side, had depths from 15.5′ to 12.6. From dock to G19, center channel, 15.8 to 13.7. Saw depths as low as 12.6 just north of G19 and on the range. From the range, center channel, didn’t see anything under 15′
    Michael J. Horowitz aboard ALTAIR

    Came through this area from the south at 12:30 PM today [June 12, 2012] and found the same problem as I have seen for three years. Shortly past Marker “19″ the bottom starts to come up quickly. 100 yards north of the marker we observed 5.1 ft and began to stir mud at six knots.
    Bob Poovey

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report from AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    This AICW troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway. Our recommendation remains to take this passage at mid to high tide.

    Cumberland Dividings mile 704, had plenty of water-saw nothing less than 18′, when we went through around 1520; LT at Cumberland Wharf at 1230, +00.4′.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Umbrella Cut a Good Alternative to St. Andrews Sound, AICW Statute Mile 686

    The choppy water problem while running the AICW’s passage across Georgia’s St. Andrew Sound results from the Waterway’s passage practically out into the briny blue, in order to clear Horseshoe Shoal, which occupies the Sound’s mid-width. Recognizing the potential for very dusty crossing here, the US Army Corps of Engineers has provided an alternate route, known as Umbrella Cut, BUT low water depths on this alternate passage can run as thin as 4 1/2 feet.

    Cruising News:
    Just a note that I recently rounded the north end of Cumberland Island and used the pass out of Saint Andrew bay marked “the hole” on the chart. Once around the north end of Cumberland it became apparent how dangerous this area is with shoals and breaking waves on both sides. Prudent cruisers should avoid this area at all cost. You could easily lose your boat here. The local tow boat captain told me he is not allowed to respond to calls out there. Too dangerous.
    Chris Hadden

    There is another route to avoid the worst of St Andrews Sound. You can go around the west end of Horseshoe Shoal and have over 8′ of water except for one small spot. Just south of G7 buoy, there is a sharp peak that rises to 4′ MLW. The charted depth of 8′ here is not accurate.
    Richard Ross M/V Chez Nous

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the AICW’s Passage Across St. Andrew Sound

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Northern End of Umbrella Cut

    Click Here To View An Earlier Posting on Umbrella Cut

  • Good Advice on Navigating the Georgia Section of the AICW

    It almost goes without saying, but let’s say it anyway, that the Georgia stretch of the Atlantic Intacoastal Waterway is the most difficult section of the entire Waterway passage from Norfolk, VA to Miami, FL. Such AICW Problem Stretches as Little Mud River and Jekyll Creek are enough to make any captain lose their religion.
    Below, Captain Grogen gives us all some good, general advice about keeping to the best depths possible in these waters.

    Time to comment on the “rules of the mud bottom channels”. The deepest part of the channel is probably NOT going to be in the middle. Water current on a falling (ebb) tide runs faster than water on a rising (flood) tide, and the faster water cuts a deeper channel. So, the deepest place in a tidal channel is the outside bend in a falling tide current. The next deepest place is the outside bend on a rising tide current. On some curves where the curve is outside for both the ebb and flood, to will find very deep water and the possibility that the curve is even outside the charts. The situation at MM 704 is a good example of that. On some S curves you will find shallow water in the center of the channel. At low tide look at the banks, along a steep bank you will find deep water close to the bank,
    along a gradual bank, shallow water. In some of the cuts that have been dredged, it isn’t always obvious which way the water flows, so you just have to observe which way the water is flowing at a given tide state. So, read the channel by looking at it, and don’t follow the magenta line on your chart plotter. Frequently, your chart plotter will show you in the marsh, and there have even been some places where the deepest water is outside of the buoyed channel! When your depth finder is showing less than the chart, wonder slowly back and forth looking for the deep water, sometimes the deep channel isn’t very wide. You actually learn a lot about a channel at low tide when you can really see it.
    Chuck Gorgen

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georga AICW Problem Stretch Directory

  • Report on AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway.The report and advice offered below come from our good friend, Chuck Baier, an experienced and skillful cruiser, is the former General Manager of Waterway Guide, and now authors an informative newsletter for our good friends at MarinaLife.

    This is another example of how easy it is to get into trouble following a plotter and not paying close attention to where you are. At the section of the ICW known as Cumberland Dividings at Statute Mile 704, just near where the southern end of the Brickhill River meets the ICW behind Cumberland Island, following the magenta line on the plotter will put you hard aground. BUT, if you follow the channel markers, you will be fine. The channel is very shallow on the red side, especially between red markers 60 and 62. Stay waayyy over on the east side and when your plotter shows you going over land, I believe it shows a small island that is not there, you are actually in the deeper water. Electronics are wonderful, but don’t take the place of observing proper markers and using good common sense. Following electronics blindly can result in inconveniences at least, and expensive repairs at the worst. Some Skippers have found this to be a very expensive mistake, so keep alert and follow the marked channel. Dredging has been ongoing along parts of this stretch.
    Chuck Baier

    I agree with Chuck Baier’s comments of 04/03/12. I have passed through her twice in the last 3 weeks on a 185′ passenger vessel following Chucks advice above. No difficulties folowing the marks, but I did make both passages at greater than 1/2 tide.
    Capt. Mike

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report from Jekyll Creek/AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 683

    The AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is recommended.

    1-11-12, passage thru Jekyll Creek, two past high tide of 10am saw water around G”19″ at 7′ depth from 30′ off of the green marker.
    Capt. Mike

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Report and Video from Brickhill River Northern Anchorage, AICW Statute Mile 696

    Brickhill River runs southeast between the Waterway’s unlighted daybeacon #40 and flashing daybeacon #41

    Anchored in Mumford Creek (10ft at low tide, lots of room.), off Brickhill river. Very quiet. Entered Brickhill at Dividings with shallow water. Jan 7, 2012.
    Shot this video of sunset http://youtu.be/NzHTxoGyiSI
    Sonny

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For Brickhill River Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Brickhill River Anchorage

  • More on Markers in Cumberland Dividings, AICW Statute Mile 704

    This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway, and Pascal’s report confirms earlier September reports of good depths here. Capt. McGuire addresses another of the problems in this stretch: the magenta line at red markers #60 and #60A is charted on the west side of the red markers rather than on the east side where one would expect it to be. Jim wisely reminds us to ignore the magenta line at those markers and pass them on the east side, i.e on your starboard when southbound and on your port when northbound.

    MM704, Cumberland Dividings, all Markers have finally been moved and are marking the shoal on the red side. 12 to 15MLW throughout.
    Capt. Pascal Gardemer

    “Cumberland Island passage south. MM Marker 704-ish –Following the ‘recommended’ magenta line/route on the AICW south bound at buoys/daymarkers after 58A needs VERY SPECIAL ATTENTION!
    Markers FL R 60, Q R 60 and FL R 62Aand R 62 MUST be left to STARBOARD ! Yes I know that makes perfect sense but when you look at the chart, the ‘recommended’ path follows the magenta line passes on the wrong side. It also passes into what looks like deep water –that is WRONG. Follow your “eyes”the correct rounding of all the buoys is Red to Starboard, the chart will show this is running right across the shallows and the marsh –trust your eyes, the buoys and your depth sounder and you will not dig clams.
    Jim McGuire

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • St. Marys Town Dock (off the AICW, on St. Mary River, near St. M. 713)

    We have another recent posting here on the Cruisers’ Net concerning anchoring off the St. Marys waterfront, and the strong currents you might encounter while doing so (see http://cruisersnet.net/?p=75937). Captain Jack’s message below pertains to a “town dock” which facilitates dinghy landing from the anchorage in question. Even if it’s only “a hunk of concrete,” I’m very glad there is indeed a ready place to come ashore and visit this delightful village!

    We tied up at the town dock [St. Marys town dock] last winter on our way down. It is really just a floating hunk of concrete, with no electricity or water. It says that there is a limit of 6 hours, but it does not appear to be enforced. We talked to people to stayed for a few days, and no one seemed to bother that we were overnight. BEWARE!!! On a falling tide the current (truly impressive!) runs perpendicular to the town dock. Getting off the dock is challenging, and we ended up with notable gelcoat scars! But I’d go back.
    Jack

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For the St. Marys Waterfront Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To St. Marys GA

  • Bumps in the Night in St. Marys Anchorage, St. Marys River off the AICW

    St. Marys River flows into the northern tip of Cumberland Sound and the path of the AICW, just north of Fernandina, FL, and serves as the coastal state line between Georgia and Florida. The town of St. Marys is an easy trip up the St. Marys River, departing the Waterway at flashing green marker #29, statute mile 713.

    We anchored off of st Marys town dock in march 2011. We chose a spot towards the south shore across the harbor from the main dock. After we anchored a guy in another boat came over and suggested we actually spend the night at the town dock as the current was so strong in that area. This sounded nice but I did not believe that was allowed by the town and chose to stay at anchor. The current through there was really unbelievable. Very fast. The sound of debris hitting the boat as it passed by and under us kept me up all night. Things going bump in the night. Our dingy has no engine. It rows very well but I did not dare leave the boat with it. I estimate 5 knots of current at times. The morning found wind and tide giving us a very slow drag to the west. I would not anchor here again. The downstream anchorage shown is where I would go. At least if you drag there is no one to hit and a soft landing. You need a motorized dingy though to safely get to and from town.
    Chris

    We tied up at the town dock [St. Marys town dock] last winter on our way down. It is really just a floating hunk of concrete, with no electricity or water. It says that there is a limit of 6 hours, but it does not appear to be enforced. We talked to people to stayed for a few days, and no one seemed to bother that we were overnight. BEWARE!!! On a falling tide the current (truly impressive!) runs perpendicular to the town dock. Getting off the dock is challenging, and we ended up with notable gelcoat scars! But I’d go back.
    Jack

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For the St. Marys Waterfront Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To St. Marys GA

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