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Umbrella Cut a Good Alternative to St. Andrews Sound, AICW Statute Mile 686

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 04-18-2012

The choppy water problem while running the AICW’s passage across Georgia’s St. Andrew Sound results from the Waterway’s passage practically out into the briny blue, in order to clear Horseshoe Shoal, which occupies the Sound’s mid-width. Recognizing the potential for very dusty crossing here, the US Army Corps of Engineers has provided an alternate route, known as Umbrella Cut, BUT low water depths on this alternate passage can run as thin as 4 1/2 feet.

Cruising News:
Just a note that I recently rounded the north end of Cumberland Island and used the pass out of Saint Andrew bay marked “the hole” on the chart. Once around the north end of Cumberland it became apparent how dangerous this area is with shoals and breaking waves on both sides. Prudent cruisers should avoid this area at all cost. You could easily lose your boat here. The local tow boat captain told me he is not allowed to respond to calls out there. Too dangerous.
Chris Hadden

There is another route to avoid the worst of St Andrews Sound. You can go around the west end of Horseshoe Shoal and have over 8′ of water except for one small spot. Just south of G7 buoy, there is a sharp peak that rises to 4′ MLW. The charted depth of 8′ here is not accurate.
Richard Ross M/V Chez Nous

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the AICW’s Passage Across St. Andrew Sound

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Northern End of Umbrella Cut

Click Here To View An Earlier Posting on Umbrella Cut

Good Advice on Navigating the Georgia Section of the AICW

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 04-09-2012

It almost goes without saying, but let’s say it anyway, that the Georgia stretch of the Atlantic Intacoastal Waterway is the most difficult section of the entire Waterway passage from Norfolk, VA to Miami, FL. Such AICW Problem Stretches as Little Mud River and Jekyll Creek are enough to make any captain lose their religion.
Below, Captain Grogen gives us all some good, general advice about keeping to the best depths possible in these waters.

Time to comment on the “rules of the mud bottom channels”. The deepest part of the channel is probably NOT going to be in the middle. Water current on a falling (ebb) tide runs faster than water on a rising (flood) tide, and the faster water cuts a deeper channel. So, the deepest place in a tidal channel is the outside bend in a falling tide current. The next deepest place is the outside bend on a rising tide current. On some curves where the curve is outside for both the ebb and flood, to will find very deep water and the possibility that the curve is even outside the charts. The situation at MM 704 is a good example of that. On some S curves you will find shallow water in the center of the channel. At low tide look at the banks, along a steep bank you will find deep water close to the bank,
along a gradual bank, shallow water. In some of the cuts that have been dredged, it isn’t always obvious which way the water flows, so you just have to observe which way the water is flowing at a given tide state. So, read the channel by looking at it, and don’t follow the magenta line on your chart plotter. Frequently, your chart plotter will show you in the marsh, and there have even been some places where the deepest water is outside of the buoyed channel! When your depth finder is showing less than the chart, wonder slowly back and forth looking for the deep water, sometimes the deep channel isn’t very wide. You actually learn a lot about a channel at low tide when you can really see it.
Chuck Gorgen

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georga AICW Problem Stretch Directory

Report on AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 704

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 04-03-2012

This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway.The report and advice offered below come from our good friend, Chuck Baier, an experienced and skillful cruiser, is the former General Manager of Waterway Guide, and now authors an informative newsletter for our good friends at MarinaLife.

This is another example of how easy it is to get into trouble following a plotter and not paying close attention to where you are. At the section of the ICW known as Cumberland Dividings at Statute Mile 704, just near where the southern end of the Brickhill River meets the ICW behind Cumberland Island, following the magenta line on the plotter will put you hard aground. BUT, if you follow the channel markers, you will be fine. The channel is very shallow on the red side, especially between red markers 60 and 62. Stay waayyy over on the east side and when your plotter shows you going over land, I believe it shows a small island that is not there, you are actually in the deeper water. Electronics are wonderful, but don’t take the place of observing proper markers and using good common sense. Following electronics blindly can result in inconveniences at least, and expensive repairs at the worst. Some Skippers have found this to be a very expensive mistake, so keep alert and follow the marked channel. Dredging has been ongoing along parts of this stretch.
Chuck Baier

I agree with Chuck Baier’s comments of 04/03/12. I have passed through her twice in the last 3 weeks on a 185′ passenger vessel following Chucks advice above. No difficulties folowing the marks, but I did make both passages at greater than 1/2 tide.
Capt. Mike

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Report from Jekyll Creek/AICW Problem Stretch, Statute Mile 683

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 01-12-2012

The AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is recommended.

1-11-12, passage thru Jekyll Creek, two past high tide of 10am saw water around G”19″ at 7′ depth from 30′ off of the green marker.
Capt. Mike

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Report and Video from Brickhill River Northern Anchorage, AICW Statute Mile 696

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 01-08-2012

Brickhill River runs southeast between the Waterway’s unlighted daybeacon #40 and flashing daybeacon #41

Anchored in Mumford Creek (10ft at low tide, lots of room.), off Brickhill river. Very quiet. Entered Brickhill at Dividings with shallow water. Jan 7, 2012.
Shot this video of sunset http://youtu.be/NzHTxoGyiSI
Sonny

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For Brickhill River Anchorage

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Brickhill River Anchorage

More on Markers in Cumberland Dividings, AICW Statute Mile 704

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 01-03-2012

This troublesome stretch lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway, and Pascal’s report confirms earlier September reports of good depths here. Capt. McGuire addresses another of the problems in this stretch: the magenta line at red markers #60 and #60A is charted on the west side of the red markers rather than on the east side where one would expect it to be. Jim wisely reminds us to ignore the magenta line at those markers and pass them on the east side, i.e on your starboard when southbound and on your port when northbound.

MM704, Cumberland Dividings, all Markers have finally been moved and are marking the shoal on the red side. 12 to 15MLW throughout.
Capt. Pascal Gardemer

“Cumberland Island passage south. MM Marker 704-ish –Following the ‘recommended’ magenta line/route on the AICW south bound at buoys/daymarkers after 58A needs VERY SPECIAL ATTENTION!
Markers FL R 60, Q R 60 and FL R 62Aand R 62 MUST be left to STARBOARD ! Yes I know that makes perfect sense but when you look at the chart, the ‘recommended’ path follows the magenta line passes on the wrong side. It also passes into what looks like deep water –that is WRONG. Follow your “eyes”the correct rounding of all the buoys is Red to Starboard, the chart will show this is running right across the shallows and the marsh –trust your eyes, the buoys and your depth sounder and you will not dig clams.
Jim McGuire

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

St. Marys Town Dock (off the AICW, on St. Mary River, near St. M. 713)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 12-18-2011

We have another recent posting here on the Cruisers’ Net concerning anchoring off the St. Marys waterfront, and the strong currents you might encounter while doing so (see http://cruisersnet.net/?p=75937). Captain Jack’s message below pertains to a “town dock” which facilitates dinghy landing from the anchorage in question. Even if it’s only “a hunk of concrete,” I’m very glad there is indeed a ready place to come ashore and visit this delightful village!

We tied up at the town dock [St. Marys town dock] last winter on our way down. It is really just a floating hunk of concrete, with no electricity or water. It says that there is a limit of 6 hours, but it does not appear to be enforced. We talked to people to stayed for a few days, and no one seemed to bother that we were overnight. BEWARE!!! On a falling tide the current (truly impressive!) runs perpendicular to the town dock. Getting off the dock is challenging, and we ended up with notable gelcoat scars! But I’d go back.
Jack

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For the St. Marys Waterfront Anchorage

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To St. Marys GA

Bumps in the Night in St. Marys Anchorage, St. Marys River off the AICW

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 12-04-2011

St. Marys River flows into the northern tip of Cumberland Sound and the path of the AICW, just north of Fernandina, FL, and serves as the coastal state line between Georgia and Florida. The town of St. Marys is an easy trip up the St. Marys River, departing the Waterway at flashing green marker #29, statute mile 713.

We anchored off of st Marys town dock in march 2011. We chose a spot towards the south shore across the harbor from the main dock. After we anchored a guy in another boat came over and suggested we actually spend the night at the town dock as the current was so strong in that area. This sounded nice but I did not believe that was allowed by the town and chose to stay at anchor. The current through there was really unbelievable. Very fast. The sound of debris hitting the boat as it passed by and under us kept me up all night. Things going bump in the night. Our dingy has no engine. It rows very well but I did not dare leave the boat with it. I estimate 5 knots of current at times. The morning found wind and tide giving us a very slow drag to the west. I would not anchor here again. The downstream anchorage shown is where I would go. At least if you drag there is no one to hit and a soft landing. You need a motorized dingy though to safely get to and from town.
Chris

We tied up at the town dock [St. Marys town dock] last winter on our way down. It is really just a floating hunk of concrete, with no electricity or water. It says that there is a limit of 6 hours, but it does not appear to be enforced. We talked to people to stayed for a few days, and no one seemed to bother that we were overnight. BEWARE!!! On a falling tide the current (truly impressive!) runs perpendicular to the town dock. Getting off the dock is challenging, and we ended up with notable gelcoat scars! But I’d go back.
Jack

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For the St. Marys Waterfront Anchorage

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To St. Marys GA

New Wine, Coffee and Gift Shop in St. Marys, GA, off the AICW from Statute Mile 713

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 11-08-2011

St. Marys River flows into the northern tip of Cumberland Sound just north of Fernandina, FL, and serves as the coastal state line between Georgia and Florida. The town of St. Marys is an easy trip up the St. Marys River, departing the Waterway at flashing green marker #29, statute mile 713.

Subject: New Wine, Coffee & Gift Shop in St. Marys, GA
Cruising News:
Hi – One of my customers suggested that I let you know that we just recently opened a new Wine, Coffee & Gift shop in downtown St. Marys, GA. We have free WIFI, too, and craft beers. Oh, and did I mention our wonderful pastries and cheese, hummus and other appetizer plates? We are just a short block from the dock. Come visit! Hours are Tues-Sat. 10am-8pm and Sundays 11am-6pm.
We hope you all have a wonderful time in St. Marys during the Thanksgiving festivities and look forward to meeting you.
Thanks,
Sue Gokalp, Manager
The Blue Goose on Osborne
126 Osborne Street
St. Marys, GA 31558
www.bluegoosewineandcoffee.com
912-409-2165

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To St. Marys GA

Shoaling in the St. Marys River, off the AICW from Statute Mile 713, 11/8/11

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 11-08-2011

The St. Marys River flows into the northern tip of Cumberland Sound just north of Fernandina, FL. This reported shoaling should be of concern for anyone making a sidetrip from the Waterway to St. Marys, GA.

GEORGIA-FLORIDA-ST SIMONS SOUND TO TOLOMATO RIVER-ST MARYS RIVER: Shoaling. Week 45/11
Mariners are advised that shoaling extends 15 yards channelward between St Marys River DBN 6 (LLNR 6805) and St Marys River DBN 8 (LLNR 6810) with minimum depth reported at 2ft MLW. Chart 11489

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To A “Navigation Alert” Position at St. Marys River

Expect Rough Waters Across St. Andrew Sound (Georgia AICW, near St. M. 689)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 11-02-2011

The choppy water problem while running the AICW’s passage across Georgia’s St. Andrew Sound results from the Waterway’s passage practically out into the briny blue, in order to clear Horseshoe Shoal, which occupies the Sound’s mid-width. Recognizing the potential for very dusty crossing here, the US Army Corps of Engineers has provided an alternate route, known as Umbrella Cut, BUT low water depths on this passage can run as thin as 4 1/2 feet.
The exchange of views below has been copied from the T&T (Trawlers and Trawlering) list.

My progress south will take me across St. Andrews sound on Wednesday. Marine weather forecast for the area is NE 10-15 knots seas 4-6 off shore, choppy inland. What would you expect the sound to be like?
Bob
Chateau de Mer

Any east wind will cause issues particularly if in opposition to the tide e.g. ebb. There is an alternate route that is doable depending on stage of tide and draft of your boat. 6′ in St Andrews is very short and mean. Enjoy the Golden Isles and cut the shoal at your own risk if crossing the sound.
Joe
M/V “Carolyn Ann” GH N-37

We went through the area yesterday. It was beyond awful in the Sound, so we turned to starboard up the Satilla River to marker 8, turned to port and worked our way through the deeper water back to Cumberland River. This is NOT the charted alternate route, but much shorter and worked for us. It was about 2 hours after high tide and we were able to make it through. We draw 5′. Not flat, but the giant elephants in St. Andrews made it a no-brainer for us.
Take a look, and good luck!
Stephanie Wakelin
M/V September Song

We traveled through this route [Umbrella Cut] today about one hour after a 7′ high tide. We draw 6′ and never saw less than 5.5′ under our keel. Nice alternate to the breakers rolling in the sound.
glebreton

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the AICW’s Passage Across St. Andrew Sound

GREAT NEWS – Live Aboard Cruisers Now Welcome in Georgia Waters

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 10-07-2011

The message below comes to us from Charlie Waller, owner of Isle of Hope Marina (A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, and past president of the Georgia Marine Business Owners Association.  Charlie and his organization have been working tirelessly to get the archaic, often ignored, but still a threat, regulation limiting boat owners to a 30 day stay aboard, changed.  Congratulations to “GAMBA,” and everyone else who worked for this change.
As Charlie explains below, now, by filling out a simple form, cruisers can stay aboard for up to a year in Georgia waters! Finally, a real victory for the cruising community!!!

Claiborne,
Good News!
The State of Georgia has just modified the Live-Aboard rule so that it will be legal and practical to say on board your boat in Georgia for more than 30 days. A rule change will allow boaters to fill out a simple form to receive permission to be onboard for up to one year in Georgia so long as the boat is docked at a marina that meets the state’s minimum requirements for pump-out facilities. Isle of Hope Marina and just a couple of other marinas currently meet those standards, but I expect that other marinas will upgrade their facilities to take advantage of this rule change. I am heading a committee that will be working with the DNR to finalize the application form in the next few weeks. The rule change will be effective January 1, 2012.
Charlie Waller
Isle of Hope Marina

Below, we present a wide cross section of responses from the cruising community to this change in Georgia’s live-aboard regulations, As you will see, some cruisers are very appreciative, others question why any regulation is needed and/or justified, and at least one fellow captain points out the process of applying to live aboard in Georgia waters for more than 30 days is not necessarily “simple.”

We had a similar problem in Washington State years ago. The head of our DNR just flatly wanted no live aboards at all. We formed the Washington Live Aboards and fought and won. The big issues now is raw sewage being dumped and soap when washing your boat.
The best advise I can give is get together with the marina owners and managers, develop rules dealing with sewage and pump outs. Be proactive and get in front of the issue. Getting teamed up with marinas gives you more credability and greater influnce.
Final thought, don’t bad mouth the state and govermental officals its difficult to further your point of view if they’re pissed at you.
We work closely with Seattle, Tacoma and Everett and they are all pro live aboards and help keep DNR in check.
Detlev Willoughby
President Tacoma Live Aboards, VP of the Washington Live Aboards

The Seattle situation is still evolving, but it is shaping up to be about greywater. The City of Seattle has proposed limiting liveaboards (where marinas will accept them) to 25% of available slips. Current LABs will be allowed to stay, but once they leave the marina can’t rent to another LAB until they come below the 25% cap. The City has also proposed imposing a fee on marinas that accept LABs and additional administrative burdens. We all know that this will discourage private marina owners from renting to LABs and that the costs will flow downstream. My question re the Georgia situation is: what happens at the end of one year? That’s a good development for cruisers wanting to stay more than a month, but what’s the impact on full time residents of the state?
Gail L.

I think the title of this piece should be changed to “Liveaboards now tolerated at a few marinas in Georgia.” The word “welcome” does not come to mind. Like other long-term cruisers I prefer to anchor out, which means I won’t be living aboard in Georgia waters any time in the near future. By the way, I still highly recommend the beautiful ICW waters of Georgia for those who like to anchor and get away from it all–just don’t stay in one place for more than 30 days.
John Kettlewell

THANKS FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL CRUISERS
Bill

Thanks Charlie!!!
Betsy Basch

Oh Goddie! The awful is now only bad.
Why should I need a States permission to live on my boat? And why should I be forced to pay for dockage to do so?
I use a composting head and had have no need for pump-out facilities. My water and electric needs are also self met. I much prefer to live on the hook.
Bad precedent to set or accept. My opinion is that Georgia is still a place to pass through until this law is totally abandoned.
Philip

Charlie has done a great job along with many other people to help the liveaboard community.
We & MANY others each year just go off shore to avoid Georgia since they still JUST DON’T get it. They need to make their portion of the ICW navigatible at ALL tide levels. Our money their loss!
We feel sorry for all the businesses that are struggling, but until Georgia catches up with the rest of the world we & many others will just go off shore & NOT put up with the hassel!
Mike M/V Elan

Actually it is a little more complicated than just “filling out a simple form”. The 30 day law has not changed, now you must file for an extension of the 30day rule. You have to file for the extension to the Commissioner of the Georgia DNR. The commissioner, in his or her sole discretion, may grant or deny any request for an extension of time to occupy a live-aboard.
Again it is not just a simple form you must meet the following Eligibility requirements:
1. No live-aboard may be occupied in Georgia coastal waters subject to the jurisdiction of the CMPA for more than 30 days during any calendar year unless the live-aboard owner has been granted an extension of time in writing by the Commissioner.
2. The applicant shall submit a written request for an extension to the Commissioner.
3. The Commissioner shall promptly consider any written request that meet the following requirements.
a. The applicant submits the request on the application form provided by the Department to the Commissioner, c/o the Coastal Resources Division, One Conservation Way, Brunswick, Georgia 31520.
b. The Coastal Resources Division receives the request at least 15 calendar days prior to the requested extension start date.
c. The applicant certifies that the live-aboard has a secured mechanism to prevent discharge of treated and untreated sewage.
Examples of secured mechanisms considered to be effective at preventing discharge include, but are not limited to, closing the seacock and padlocking, using a non-releasable wire tie, or removing the seacock handle (with the seacock closed).
d. The applicant certifies that they will not discharge any sewage, treated or untreated, into Georgia coastal waters subject to the jurisdiction of the CMPA.
e. The applicant certifies that the live-aboard is capable of being used as a means of transportation on the water and is capable of safe, mechanically-propelled, navigation under average Georgia coastal wind and current conditions.
f. The applicant identifies the eligible marina at which the live-aboard operator will moor the live-aboard.
g. The applicant provides written documentation of a slip rental agreement with an eligible marina.
h. The applicant states the reasons for requesting the extension and the period of time for which the extension is requested.
Doesn’t seem that simple to me! Is working with the government ever simple? When you give them all that information you have given them all they need to through you out of the state and band you from ever entering the state on your way to Florida.
What about the fines when you break one of their laws?
There is no fee or tax this first year!
What other state do you have to go before a Commissioner to live in that state?
Kevin R. Quinn

I don’t see this as a victory for cruisers at all. It is a victory for the marinas. Many of us anchor whenever possible and stay away from marina life and all its distractions and expense. Trust me, I will continue to go outside and bypass Georgia altogether. My dollars are much better spent elsewhere.
Jerry Simpson

At long last. Thanks to all who brought this about. It makes sense.
Diana Prentice

I have to agree with the other posters–the title of this blog entry is complete propaganda. Shame on you for trying to spin this as some great win/win situation for boaters. As if we are too stupid to figure out for ourselves what the real facts are! Pathetic.
That form is the opposite of simple, INO. And way too intrusive, asking too many questions that have zero to do with the idea of living for a while in Georgia waters.
The sad thing is, that with this guy ‘fighting’ for us boaters, we can expect that the status quo for Georgia to boaters will continue for the foreseeable future. The Georgia ‘solution’ isn’t a solution at all, as obviously made note of ad nauseum above by most boaters responding. So I agree, we will continue to avoid lingering in Georgia waters. I can’t imagine how much money the marinas lose in Georgia because of the attitude of the State.
Alan Avante

Go to the bahamas instead. I was going to cruise North for a change, but with Georgias new regs and St. Augustines new 10 day anchoring limits upcoming why should I spend my money and time where I am not wanted. Please do not spend money in any places that are not cruiser friendly.
Dave C.

Good Passage through Umbrella Cut Alternate AICW Passage near Statute Mile 696 to 686

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 09-26-2011

The Umbrella Cut Route northbound takes you from Mile 696 in Cumberland River through Floyd Creek, across the Satilla River and into the Little Satilla to rejoin the AICW at Mile 686 in Jekyll Sound. This is often considered the route of choice when the primary passage which passes through St. Andrew Sound, and almost out into the briny blue, is kicking up.

We used the alternate route on 9/19 heading south. We entered Umbrella Cut at almost exactly mid tide, according to the tide chart, but more likely equivalent to about 2/3 high tide due to a strong NE wind and our observations. We traveled at about 7-8 kts all the way through and took about an hour. Our depth readings were 10′ at A5 and A6 at the entrance to Umbrella Cut, the lowest on the whole route of 5.5′ at A10, 8.5′ at A24 to A26, and 7.5′ just south of A26.
Our boat is a 44′ long Endeavour TrawlerCat with a 3′ draft.
Ralph Small, M/V AmmyBoo

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Northern End of Umbrella Cut

Click Here To View An Earlier Posting on Umbrella Cut

Report of Good Depths, AICW/Cumberland Dividings Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 704)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 09-26-2011

This troublesome stretch that lies at the intersections of the Brickhill River, Crooked River and the Waterway, and we are happy to report good depths for now, especially in contrast to the shoaling in the spring.

Just to reassure that there are apparently no adverse changes since spring, we passed thru here on 9/21 heading north at 1 hour past low tide, per tide chart. The lowest reading we had was 15′ at R 60. The readings from R62-G63 to G59A were all just over 20′.
I ran approximately 100′-150′ off the Red markers and about 50′ off the Green markers. As others have said, forget your chartplotter and charts here, just keep your eyes on the markers which were all in place on the 21st and keep to the Green side.
Ralph Small, M/V AmmyBoo

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the Cumberland Dividings

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Passage Report from Jekyll Creek/AICW Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 683)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 08-18-2011

The AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is recommended. Carl provides us with another passage report through this very shallow creek

I passed this problem spot yesterday (17 August) Northbound in my 35 foot sportfisherman which draws 3 feet. I got distracted and veered slightly east of the channel, just south of “19″. Realizing my mistake I headed due West, but then seemingly couldn’t find a channel. There was a brief period where I showed 11 feet but that vanished quickly and I was forced to navigate through lots of 8 foot water at least to Marker 19, and possibly a short distance further. What is impressive about this is that the tide at that moment was +6.3 feet, nearly high tide! That means there’s only 1.7 feet of water at low tide.
Skipper Carl

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Reports on AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 683)

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 05-30-2011

The AICW/Jekyll Creek Problem Stretch has had shoaling for some time now with reports of depths below 5ft at low tide. Mid to high tide passage is recommended.

I followed my usual path thru Jekyll but found less water than on previous trips with as little as 5′ mlw in spots. Either I messed up on that run or shoaling got worst over winter. I’ll keep playing the tides…
Captain Pascal

We traveled this stretch on 4/27/11 at 1 hr.before low tide mid channel and saw no less then 7′. Follow the range markers listed as RW on the charts around the curve past Jekyl Wharf Marina.
Capts.Steve & Di Koch

May 2011: came thru northbound and 7′ MLW was the lowest reading i found mostly near G19 and along the range. I passed about 150′ off G19 then turned right on the range. Stayed on the range till past R16 (passed about 75′ away).
No depth issue between the bridge and the wharf. You just have to take it slow and found the best water as the “channel” is very shallow. On a previous run in April, I did find some 5′ spots around G19 not far from where i passed on this trip.
Pascal aboard MY Charmer, 70′ 6+ draft

May 28, 2011. Northbound on a 50′ trawler with 5 foot draft. Passed marker 20A at 4:56 pm. Passed marker 10 at 5:19 pm
20A depth 14.1 feet
20 depth 13.3
19 depth 13.4
17 depth 13.7
16 depth 14.1
13 depth 14.5
11 depth 17.6
10 depth 22.3
I hope this is useful.
Darrel Peters Aboard “Present Moment”

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

Entrance to Umbrella Creek Shoaling, Off the AICW at Statute Mile 687, 5/8/11

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 05-08-2011

The primary mouth of Umbrella Creek, with anchorages close to the alternate Umbrulla Cut AICW Passage, lies off Jekyll Sound west of the Waterway, departing statute mile 687. Umbrulla Creek’s entrance should not be confused with the Umbrella Cut AICW route, which lies north and west of Umbrella Creek. Our nearby recommended anchorages for these waters can be reached via Umbrella Cut, thereby avoiding the shoaly entrance to Umbrella Creek, from Jekyll Sound, as described below.

May 7th, 2011
We tried to enter the umbrella creek to drop the anchor, the sandbar at the entrance is not 8 feet as shown on the chart, our echo sounder showed us less than 5 feet . Further north, the area is shoaling as well, care should be taken!
Manfred

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For Alternate Route Anchorages

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To A “Navigation Alert” Position at Umbrella Creek

A Visit to Lang’s Marina in St. Mary’s GA, off the AICW from Statute Mile 713

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 04-24-2011

The St. Marys River flows into the northern tip of Cumberland Sound just north of Fernandina, FL. The town of St. Marys is an easy trip up the St. Marys River (Georgia-Florida state line) departing the Waterway at flashing green marker #29, statute mile 713.

St. Mary’s is a little gem with super friendly people and good food. Doc’s was a cool place with live jazz one night. My wife liked the martini bar at Seagle’s. Lang’s Marina was a great bargain at $1.00 per foot, docks were in great shape with very helpful folks who were tied up there. On the down side, the marina bathrooms appeared to have last been cleaned several months earlier. Also, the $15 price for pump out was over the top and had to be paid in cash directly to the marina dockmaster. Hmmm.
Skipper Bill Brubaker

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Lang’s Marina

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Lang’s Marina

Report and Advice on Jekyll Creek, AICW Statute Mile 683

Posted by Larry Dorminy | Posted on 03-30-2011

As many of you already know, the Jekyll Creek section of the AICW, south of St. Simons Sound, is one of the worst “AICW Problem Stretches” on the entire run from Norfolk, VA to Miami, FL.

5 ft at almost low tide on 3/24/11 40 ft inside G19. Channel very narrow. Go very slow.
Skipper Stephen

I cruise this section of the AICW often. If you are heading south I would hit Jekyll Creek at mid tide and rising because you will want to hit the Brickhill River (south end) and AICW at high tide. Because that is a very bad section as well.”
James Rogers

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Jekyll Creek

Cumberland Island (off the Southern Georgia AICW, near Statute Mile 711.5)

Posted by Claiborne Young | Posted on 03-21-2011

The best way to visit Cumberland Island is to leave the AICW a short hop north of marker #34, then work you way north along the wide, but mostly unmarked Dungeness Greyfield Channel which parallels the western shore of Cumberland Island. Drop the hook off the Park Service dock, also known as the “Sea Camp Dock,” and dinghy ashore. Once there, get ready for some of the most breathtaking scenery imaginable!

I would also add Cumberland Island just before Jekyll. You have to anchor, but you are only a very short distance from the dinghy dock. Great history, estates, hiking and a wonderful beach on the ocean
side, plus the wild horses.
Jack Robinson

Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Anchorage Directory Listing For the Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of The Dungeness Greyfield Channel Anchorage