Chart View Search

Search Waterway by Nautical Mile

Select Waterway:
Statute Mile:

(Min: 0nm Max: 1095nm)

Search by Latitude/Longtitude

Degrees/Minutes/Decimal Minutes Format
Degrees/Decimal Degrees Format
Latitude:
Longitude:
(Degrees/Decimal Degrees Format Only)

Latitude:
Deg:   Min/Dec. Min:   

Longitude:
Deg:   Min/Dec. Min:   

(Degrees/Minutes/Decimal Minutes Format Only)

Close
Salty Southeast
Cruisers' Net
Cruisers Helping Cruisers
Georgetown, South Carolina
Port City Marina - Wilmington, NC
Zimmerman Marine
  • Captain Charmaine Reports on Anchoring By Tarpon Belly Keys (Back Route from Marathon to Key West)

    Author's Vessel, "September Sea" Anchored at Tarpon Belly Key

    Wow, what a GREAT article by our Florida Keys SSECN Correspondent, Captain Charmaine Smith Ladd. To reach the anchorage Captain Charmaine describes hard by Tarpon Belly Key, cruisers whose craft draw 5 feet or less, might choose to run the so-called, Back Route from Marathon to Key West, at least partially. To do this, run north on Big Spanish Channel, sandwiched between Big Pine Key to the west (among others) and Little Pine Key, plus several smaller keys, to the east. At Harbor Key Bank Light, you make a turn to the southwest, and slip along the northern face of the uninhabited keys all the way to Northwest Channel, which, in turn provides access to Key West.
    Cruisers bound for Tarpon Belly Keys should depart this “back route” near Statute Mile 12287, and navigate the “Cudjoe Channel” to a point abeam of Tarpon Belly Keys. This is an unmarked passage, so the use of an up-to-date, GPS chartplotter is highly suggested.
    For those whose vessel requires more than 5 feet of water to keep off the bottom, Captain Charmaine recommends navigating an arc around Bullard Bank, Monkey Bank, and Sideboard Bank to enter Cudjoe Channel from the Northeast.
    What a neat place to be once the hook is down. Read Captain Charmaine’s article below, study her pics, and you’ll see how neat it is!

    Tarpon Belly Keys, Florida Keys
    N24 43.74 W81 31.24
    by Charmaine Smith Ladd
    September Sea is often out sailing and anchoring throughout the Florida Keys. Often the question “Where do you go?” is presented to me. When told of the plethora of unique and quaint places where we anchor, the usual response is: “There’s no protection there, is there?” Or, “That’s Bayside, what do you draw?” We draw 5’8″ and have no problems navigating Florida Bay–we simply consult and adhere to our charts!
    Cruisers often forget that shoal waters surrounding an anchoring area can be just as beneficial as a body of land for protection. When looking at charts, one limits their anchorage areas if land is viewed as the only source of protection from foul weather and indicative of a comfortable anchorage. Shoal waters can provide much the same protection.

    Exploring Ruins on Tarpon Belly Key

    One fine example of this is Tarpon Belly Keys. Looking at the charts one might view it as undesirable for protected anchoring. But a closer examination shows the shoal waters around it prohibit fetch from building in the area. The only seemingly exposed area is from the Northwest, but because of the shape of the narrow channel from the Northwest, and its surrounding shoal waters, you are quite protected. It is a very comfortable and lovely anchorage.
    Tarpon Belly Key used to be a shrimp farm. There are two man-made, coral bottomed canals that are fabulous for exploration. From a distance, it appears there is a sand beach but it is sand-colored coral. Be sure to wear sturdy shoes when going up to the Key. We are careful to have an extra long painter on the dinghy so that no chafe occurs while tied up to a tree on the Key. There’s a home-made tree swing, remnants of campfires, a foundation for what used to be the main office of the shrimp farm, and lots of remains of concrete and structural steel that gives it a feeling of walking through a historic time in the Keys. You can walk, albeit carefully, atop one of the old concrete beams from one side of the canal to the other section of the Key, then follow an overgrown road and see the other canal. It is quite picturesque!
    On Cudjoe Key, seen southwest of Tarpon Belly, the great Fat Albert makes it home. Many have seen it from afar, a big weather blimp high in the sky. However, from Tarpon Belly’s vantage point, you have an incredible view of Fat Albert as it’s docked.
    Hope you enjoy the pictures of this most unique area of the Keys! There are so many places like this where you can anchor and enjoy the beauty, wildlife, and solitude. Open your anchoring choices by remembering that surrounding shoal waters can also offer great protection!
    Charmaine Smith Ladd, s/v September Sea
    SSECN Correspondent, Florida Keys
    “Bringing you the low down from down low!”
    www.SeptemberSea.com

    Home-made Swing on Tarpon Belly Key

    Author Explores Tarpon Belly Key

    Man-made Canal on Tarpon Belly Key

    Old Dock on Shrimp Canal - Tarpon Belly Key

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Florida Keys Anchorage Directory Listing For the Tarpon Belly Key Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Tarpon Belly Key Anchorage

  • New Fuel Stop Immediately North of St. Augustine Inlet (Statute Mile 775.5)

     904-547-2219 Inlet Marina sits on the site of the old Sea Love Marina, along the AICW/Tolomato River’s eastern shores, north of St. Augustine Inlet, and hard by the Vilano Beach Bridge, will be a full fledged marina. Inlet Marina just opened with new fuel tanks installed for unleaded 89 octane gas with no ethanol and of course diesel. They currently are just a fuel stop but they are supposed to have their new restaurant opened on May 15th, called Beaches. This marina used to be the old Sea Love marina which was closed last year sometime then bought and is now permitted for 60 slips (not yet built), but they do have two floating docks, one concrete and one wood and a fuel dock. There is also a boat rental operation already there. They have a nice beach area near the dock office also. There is a lot of area behind the marina office which is planned for development with a Publix grocery planned as part of the complex and they are supposed to have a grocery delivery operation for the marina if folks want to get provisions while fueling..that is to come. The new owners are taking it slow but are committed to the new operations success. The Marina is very close to the St. Augustine inlet and on the AICW. So it is very convenient for cruisers to stop in for fuel.Inlet Marina is, as of 4/14/11, the newest SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR. Eventually, this facility, which sits on the site of the old Sea Love Marina, along the AICW/Tolomato River’s eastern shores, north of St. Augustine Inlet, and hard by the Vilano Beach Bridge, will be a full fledged marina. For now, these good folks are anxious to sell fuel to all passing cruisers. Please help us welcome Inlet Marina to the Cruisers’ Net fold!

    Inlet Marina just opened with new fuel tanks installed for unleaded 89 octane gas with no ethanol and of course diesel. They currently are just a fuel stop but they are supposed to have their new restaurant opened on May 15th, called Beaches. This marina used to be the old “Sea Love” marina which was closed last year sometime then bought and is now permitted for 60 slips (not yet built), but they do have two floating docks, one concrete and one wood and a fuel dock. There is also a boat rental operation already there. They have a nice beach area near the dock office also. There is a lot of area behind the marina office which is planned for development with a Publix grocery planned as part of the complex and they are supposed to have a grocery delivery operation for the marina if folks want to get provisions while fueling..that is to come. The new owners are taking it slow but are committed to the new operations success. The Marina is very close to the St. Augustine inlet and on the AICW.
    So it is very convenient for cruisers to stop in for fuel.

    This is the old “Sea Love” marina. Lat: 29*55’4″ Longitude: 81*17’55”
    Marina tele: 904-547-2219
    Marina Fax: 904-547-2221
    Fuel prices on April 14, 2011: (All taxes inlcuded – price shown is what boater pays)
    Diesel $4.09 tax included
    Gas, 89 octane, no ethanol $4.29 tax incl.

  • Bureaucracy Woes at Savannah City Docks, Savannah, GA (Savannah River, off the AICW)

    It’s unfortunate when communications get crossed up which can easily be the case when municipal services are involved. Despite any limitations, Savannah City Docks has…LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! We’re glad Jeff survived his run-in with bureaucracy with a sense of humor!

    Don’t waste your valuable time heading for this dock. I called a week ago asked for a reservation, I was told it was 1st come 1st served. NOT TRUE. After tying up (and surviving a divorce) got all set and headed off to pay, we were ready for a little nightlife after many nights up the icw on the hook. Well we phoned a lady by the name of Shawn, we were told we could not stay as there were boats coming in with RESERVATIONS! I told Shawn that we were the only boat, 42′ at the end of the 250 foot dock. She did not seem to care and suggested a dock further up river at $3.50 per foot. It is now 8 PM, five hours later, we had dinner across from the city dock and the dock is still completely empty. Now I need a divorce lawyer.
    Skipper Jeff

    I think it sounds like a scam to send business elsewhere and a call should be made to the city with a complaint about this.
    Susan Dawson

    We had a similar problem last year on Memorial Day. We were run off as well. We were told first come-first serve and when you get there there is a number to call. Nobody answered, and next thing you know a police officer came by and made us all leave.
    Sea Huddle

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Georgia Marina Directory Listing For Savannah City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Savannah City Docks

  • Cyber Cafe at Charleston City Marina, AICW Statute Mile 469.5

    Welcome to The City Marina The City Marina Wins Jack Nichol Award for Design See our feature on The Visitors Network Located on mile marker 469.5 of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the Charleston City Marina features 19,000 feet of linear dock space covering 40 acres of water.  The marina was named 2005 National Marina of the Year (Marina Dock Age Magazine), and offers state-of-the-art amenities and facilities to promise an enjoyable stay.  The City Marina's MegaDock extends 1,530 feet and is the longest free standing floating fuel dock in the Southeast.  These features, and Historic Downtown Charleston location, make The City Marina one of the east coast's most popular marinas.Charleston City Marina, A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, is our home port, so it’s natural that I like to brag about the excellent facilities, convenient location and friendly personnel.

    Even with all the marina offers, the office staff has added free coffee (compliments of BoatUS) , complimentary USAToday and two computer stations for transients’ use. Located in the Dock Office at the north end of the MegaDock, the cyber-cafe has two lounge chairs in addition to the separate computer table and stools. Free WiFi service continues to be available in slips.
    Larry

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s South Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Charleston City Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Charleston City Marina

  • Praise for Bay Point Marina (Panama City, FL on Grand Lagoon)

    To access this superb facility, you must leaven the Northern Gulf ICW, and follow the path towards Panama City Inlet. You must then cut off on a narrow channel into wide Grand Lagoon. Bay Point Marina is the first facility encountered on Grand Lagoon.
    Having visited here many times myself, I can attest to what a great place this is, and these good folks are a SALT SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!!!

    Steve,the harbormaster, had a great shrimp boil for everyone here at the Marina. In the Carolinas we would call it Frogmore Stew. There was live music, all the shrimp, sausage, corn on the cob, potatoes, desserts and drinks that you could consume.
    Also if you need a mechanic in this area, Chuck Davis is the man. His phone number is 850-596-6469.
    Roy & Elvie on Roy El’

  • Key West: Captain Jane Eats Cuban at El Siboney

    Yummmm, but I bet there were no vampires within 100 miles of Captain Jane’s vessel after this meal!

    The corner of Catherine and Margaret Streets is a healthy walk, a touch under a mile, from the Key West Bight marinas — just the right amount to allow you to imagine you earned a really good meal at El Siboney, a homey Cuban restaurant that is the best Cuban food I’ve ever eaten. The walk back will also help, especially if you finished your meal.
    We both ordered the garlic grilled half chicken with yellow rice, black beans and plantains. The folks at the next table looked over and said: Did you order the dinner special for four? Indeed, now that they mentioned it, that is what our two plates looked like and indeed, the leftovers provided a very nice second meal the next day. The chicken was crispy, appeared to be grilled under a weight or press of some sort giving it that special mix of crunch and smooth. We were two very happy campers. Black beans and rice were what they should be — flavorful, fresh and real. The plantains, crispy, caramelized and good enough to be dessert.
    We hear they’ve opened a branch in Marathon in the shopping center across from the Publix. We are hoping one of you Salty Southeast Cruisers Net Subscribers will step up to the lunch plate and check it and let us know how it is. As for the Key West original? Fantastic and the prices are very modest for anywhere, not just for Key West. A huge lunch costs less than $10 per person. A reason to brave that last bit of Hawk Channel and sail to what some say is the edge of the known world.
    PS: This was another Heidi Garbo of Garbo’s Grill recommendation — thank you Heidi!
    Captain Jane
    S/V Lady Jane

  • Jones Fuel Dock, Now a Thing of the Past (Statute Mile 945.5)

    Waterway veterans will remember fondly stopping at Jones Fruit dock, north of Vero Beach. Once upon a day, you could tie up here, go ashore and purchase very fresh citrus fruit from Orange Groves literally next door.
    Unfortunately, for most of us those days ended some years ago. The “dock” has been is such poor shape of late that I have not recommended stopping here since the mid 2000’s. I am very sorry to hear of the final passing of Captain Richard Jones. He will be missed up and down the AICW!

    On a sad note, we arrived at Jones Fruit Dock in the Indian River and found everything locked up and the dock empty. We learned from a neighbor that the owner passed away last Saturday, March 26. We had never had the chance to visit the dock before, but had heard from other loopers that it was a stop we should make. We pressed on, but 2 or 3 other looper boats behind us did tie up for the night. The neighbor had no idea what would become of the place.
    Larry & Jane Pfeifer
    on Bavarian Cream

    Here is the Obituary.

    http://tinyurl.com/3trfv6d

    Ted Stehle, Editor
    WaterwayGuide/Skipper Bob Publications

    Thats a real shame
    Jim Lowry

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Old Location of Jones Fruit Dock

  • The Beauty and Danger of Bahia Honda Anchorage (Florida Keys)

    Bahia Honda Anchorage

    The Bahia Honda Channel/State Park anchorage, which is the subject of Captain Charmaine’s article below. lies west of Marathon, and can only be entered from the Hawk Channel side, as a low level bridge prevents access from the Inside/ICW route. Even vessels approaching from Hawk Channel must cruise through a narrow section of the old Bahia Honda Bridge, where a short section of the span has been removed to facilitate navigation. We already have a “Navigation Alert” set at this old span, due to an entry in the Local Notice to Mariners about the bridge deteriorating.
    Now, Captain Charmaine gives us even more to think about in regards to this anchorage. Follow the second link below Charmaine’s article to view this anchorage in Chart View!

    March 29th 2011

    The Beauty and Dangers of Bahia Honda Anchorage
    by Charmaine Smith Ladd

    Bahia Honda Key is gorgeous. There’s something there for everyone at this incredible State Park. There is an RV Park, Marina (albeit for shallower drafted vessels), lots of nature trails, nearly 3-1/2 miles of paved road for jogging, biking, and walking. There are steps set between lush palms where you can walk atop the old railroad bridge and see captivating views for miles! Bahia Honda also boasts 2-1/2 miles of natural white sand making several beautiful beaches that are hard to best. The crescent beach of the anchorage is lovely. There is a comfy beach house for changing and outdoor showers to rinse off the saltwater after a relaxing swim. The Keys has never been known for its beaches. Bahia Honda puts us on the “beach” map!

    The ample anchorage is set between the remains of the old Henry Flagler Railroad (destroyed by the famous 1935 Labor Day Hurricane) and highway U.S. 1. In fair weather, this anchorage is ideal with its plethora of breathtaking foliage and million-dollar views of the beach. Once you’ve anchored, remember the current can be swift between the bridges, so don’t be too quick to jump into the water and swim to the nearby beach until you know it is safe to do so. You can also dinghy over to the friendly marina and tie up there. It is a short and enjoyable walk to the beach.

    In the anchorage, there is great protection from the east. However, any foul weather from the North or South can blow inadequately secured boats into one of the bridges. This has occurred many times in the past. But it does not have to happen.

    Last night (March 28th), it was reported that a sailing vessel was dismasted while anchored in Bahia Honda. A squall of weather blowing NNE hit the Keys around 22:30 with sustained winds of 25 knots, gusts up to 40. Before going to Bahia Honda to anchor, one must realize that even though the weather forecast may be for sunshine and lollipops; sudden and fast moving squalls do begin to occur this time of year. Bahia Honda anchorage, in the opinion of this writer, is fabulous if limited to a day sail as the month of March ends and the squally weather and winds begin.

    Opening into Bahia Honda Anchorage From Hawk Channel

    The report on the VHF from the Coast Guard said the boat was was taking on water and possibly sinking. With the wind direction, the vessel must have blown from south to north and hit the old Flager bridge. The old pilings there are quite substantial, a fiberglass hull is simply no match for those mammoth pilings. It was later stated that two passengers were soon rescued from the vessel in peril. At this time it is not known whether or not the vessel sank. It is great to know no one was hurt in what undoubtedly was a life-threatening situation.

    It is not clear whether or not the vessel had a working engine. On that note, it is unwise for any vessel without motor capability to anchor in the Bahia Honda anchorage. In the past, many a vessel without engines have sailed into Bahia Honda to wait for more favorable winds. As my mother used to say, “Be careful what you wish for…you just might get it…and all that comes with it.” That adage is a good one. This time of year one may very well get far more winds than wished for. Without a working engine one would be at the mercy of the winds. There is no mercy when anchored in between two bridge spans with no means to otherwise maneuver.

    The bottom line here is that this is just another one of the many horror stories people have read or heard about Bahia Honda’s Anchorage. Truly, there is a time for everything. With knowledge and attention, one can anchor there with no problems at all. September Sea has been there at least ten times staying as long as a week to ten days and we have never had a problem with holding. And yes, we have encountered a few storms before realizing there is a time of year not to anchor there! But we never dragged there–however, lots of other boats certainly did while we were there! We always anchor close to the beach where the sand and grass are plentiful and the difficult rocky bottom as far behind us as possible. We do not anchor in Bahia Honda overnight this time of year as hurricane season grows nearer.

    Be informed. Bahia Honda is wonderful!! One must use their head so their vessel and passengers will stay safe. You will love Bahia Honda’s anchorage, but at the right time of year and for the proper length of stay. In the Keys during this time of year one must watch the weather many times a day. If you don’t have radar, use NOAA weather on the VHF. In any anchorage in the Keys one can usually hail another vessel on either VHF 16 or 68 to inquire about weather. And don’t forget to use your instincts. Last night I noticed the breeze had cooled significantly. That was all the notice needed to turn on the VHF NOAA weather forecast and check radar.

    Bahia Honda. Beautiful, captivating, and wonderful for the entire family…but anchoring there can indeed be dangerous when not fully informed.

    Charmaine Smith Ladd, s/v September Sea
    SSECN Correspondent – Florida Keys
    “Bringing you the low down from down low!”
    http://www.SeptemberSea.com

    Great article on one of our absolute favorite anchorages. No trip to the Keys is complete without a log entry for Bahia Honda, even if it is just for lunch!

    Captain Charmaine's Vessel ("September Sea") Anchored in Bahia Honda

    Worth Waiting
    Columbia

    Hello,
    All of the above stated is true. From the beauty of the park and beaches to the dangers of the anchorage.
    I did spend a night there in the squall conditions described above.
    However since I had read about the strong currents I had two anchors down not even considering that there might be a squall. The winds that night were predicted ENE which would be from behind the island giving us protection if they increased. But the squalls came from the ESE where there was no protection, surprise, surprise. We got pounded on an off for hours in the middle of the night. Sitting under the dodger in the companionway all the while I was thinking, if I drag I’m going to drag into that bridge.
    But since my anchors are over sized and one rode is all chain, with plenty of scope out we did not drag.
    I night to remember.
    Cap Jules
    S/V Nemesis

    I was there on the night of March 28th, having just returned from Cuba. The boat that hit the bridge was a 22 foot Pacific Seacraft. His engine was not working properly and he went back very quickly once he started dragging, although he tried to let more scope out – I had a spotlight on him to assist. The boat was not dismasted and Boat US was there to take he and his wife off the boat, which was then towed back into the anchorage and re-anchored, then towed to a marina the next day. I myself dragged onto the beach that evening and had to be towed off by boat US, and again was re-anchored well out where my boat comfortably handled the conditions.
    The safe part of this anchorage is well off the beach, where the current has not scoured the sand and it is possible to get decent holding. Close to the beach is NOT where you want to be despite what the OP says – the current rips through there and with the right winds, will pull your anchor out as it did mine. This by the way is the advice that Boat US will give you as well.
    Wally Moran

    Check out: [LINK IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE] http://www.flkeysnews.com//2011/03/30/324001/severe-storms-wallop-the-keys.html
    Susan Kennedy

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Florida Keys Anchorage Directory Listing For the Bahia Honda Channel Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Bahia Honda Channel Anchorage

  • Updates on AICW/Little Mud River Problem Stretch (Statute Mile 655)

    Again, Captain Bob takes this trouble spot within less than two hours of high tide and offers some advice to his fellow cruisers.
    Please note that the Little Mud River section of the AICW, is the WORST problem stretch of the entire run from Norfolk to Miami. Trying to interpolate the tidal tables, it looks as if we must subtract 6 to 7 feet from the soundings below to discover what depths would be at MLW. That means we could easily be looking at a mere 3 feet of water near markers #190 and #195.
    TIME YOUR PASSAGE THROUGH LITTLE MUD RIVER FOR HIGH TIDE ONLY!!!!!!

    10-29-10 Little Mud River (A Walk in the Park) Anchored in Duplin River night before, Great Anchorage
    Short Distance to Little Mud River. High Tide was 1200 Noon. Arrive Little Mud River 1-1/2 Hours before HIGH TIDE.
    Marker R190 10 Ft,
    Marker G195 10 Ft.
    Exit Mud River @ 1247 PM.
    Draft Five Ft we had five under the keel Minimum all the way. Good Run.
    Instead of folks posting horror stories they need to take life easy and do these areas of concern two hours before high tide.
    Captains Bob and Helen
    aboard M/Y ALLEZ

    We just passed the Little Mud River. We hit it at exactly low tide. Uh oh. We made it through OK however. The minimum depth I saw was 6.5 feet near marker 194. We met a tug going north. He said that he didn’t have a depth sounder, but that he draws 8 feet and he made it through fine, also at low tide. Go figure.
    Captains Dick and Libby Mills

    Good evening all, went through today 11/2/10 at 2:00 PM local, just about low tide & only saw 6.9 ft, just stay in the MIDDLE & you will be fine! Winds today were between twenty to thirty & did not seem to affect the depths.
    Captains Mike & Barbara aboard M/V Elan
    2011/03/09
    We did basically the same thing that Captains Bob and Helen did, anchoring in Duplin river the night before passage through the Little Mud River section. We hit it at about an hour before high tide and had a trouble free passage. (s/v MarLyn, S2 30ft, 5ft draft)
    Skipper Mark

    Transited Little Mud River 3/27/11 at half tide. 8-9 ft through mid channel.
    Skipper Stephen

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Little Mud River

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To The AICW Problem Stretch

  • Major New Publication Available on Florida Anchoring

    Our sincere thanks to Captain Mary Dixon for forwarding the link below. We have read the document in question, and it IS LENGTHY and very wordy, BUT it is perhaps the last word on virtually ALL the issues surrounding the complex and emotionally charged Florida anchoring issue.

    Cruising News:
    New publication on Florida anchoring
    [LINK IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE]http://www.flseagrant.org/joomla/images/PDFs/anchoring%20away_03_09_11_full_web3.pdf
    Mary Dixon

Cruising News and Reference Directories
Boat Broker Partners