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    • Update: New Vero Beach City Marina Pumpout Mandatory Requirements


      Cruisers Net has confirmed the new regulations at Vero Beach City Marina. Please phone the marina before docking to arrange a pumpout: 772-231-2819 or 772-978-4960. 

      11/10 Cruisers Net received this cuarification from Vero Beach Marina:

      Vessels that have reservations for mooring balls are the main focus and before they secure to a ball, 
      they MUST  come to fuel dock, get their mooring ball assignment, and get pumped out or show acceptable evidence of a recent pump out with enough remaining capacity to cover their reservation time AND have the “Y-Valve” secured .
      Pump outs at the fuel dock are free…if they have to come out to your vessel the pumpout is $5 dollars. 
      If your Y-Valve is not secured, they will issue you a labeled tag for your reservation that will be used to 
      secure the Y-valve.

      New Vero Beach City Marina Pump-out Mandatory Requirements
      The Vero Beach City Marina has just instituted new requirements for any vessel coming in for a dock or mooring. You MUST now come to the fuel dock for a mandatory pump-out FIRST before going to your slip or mooring. You will also be issued a numbered cable tie for your discharge valve. This has apparently been pushed on them by environmental groups & will be enforced with “random sweeps” by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Agency (as reported in the media). 
      Russ Rackliffe

      Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s Eastern Florida Marina Directory Listing For Vero Beach Municipal Marina

      Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Vero Beach Municipal Marina and the Vero Beach Mooring Field

      1 Facebook Likes, 1 Facebook Reactions

      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Jon Hensley -  November 10, 2019 - 1:31 pm

        The poster is correct. Mandatory pump out unless you can produce a pump out log showing a recent pump out

        Reply to Jon
    • Proper Use of VHF Channels 16 and 13 by Roger Long

      Our thanks to Roger Long for this discussion on the use of channel 13 and channel 16.

      This also applies to passing and meeting discussions. Every vessel on waterways such as the ICW should be monitoring 13 as well as 16 for situational awareness about the bridges and what commercial traffic is doing. Few do so however so you will usually need to hail a vessel you are overtaking on 16 if you want to alert them. If your call is just, “Rover, this is Sea Queen passing you to port.” and all you need back it “Roger” or “Go Ahead”, then that is OK. However, if you want to ask which side, do they want a slow pass, etc., you should ask them to switch to another channel first. If someone overtaking you asks questions requiring more than a one word response, you should ask them to switch to another channel.

      Following frequent USCG admonishments a couple days ago, most ICW travelers were switching to 17 or 68 for passing discussions after an initial 16 hail. This is fine but it makes more sense to use the channel identified for the purpose. Contrary to urban legend, 13 is not a channel for commercial craft. It just sounds like it because professionals use it as intended. 13 is the Bridge (helm) to Bridge (helm) channel for exchange of navigational information between vessels in a common situation such as passing or meeting. If you listen to it in busy areas such as the Saint John River, you’ll learn that the professionals NEVER call each other on 16 first. A direct hail on 13 is appropriate and saves 16 clutter. The reason commercial vessels hail recreational vessel on 16 first is because they know most yacht drivers are ignorant and don’t waste time trying to get them the proper way first. In the Saint John River, if you listen, you’ll discover that the pilots almost always hail yachts on 13 first because they want to follow correct procedure. You can then hear the eye roll (another idiot) as they hail on 16 and ask for a switch to 13. I’ve often heard them tell yachts to please stay on 13 all the time they are in the river.

      We have a sign just below our name board that says, “Hail CH 13 to Pass”. It saves a lot of 16 airtime and button pushing. I monitor 16 (as legally required) via dual watch and switch to that for the few boats that ignore the sign. I have had many commercial professionals complement me on the sign and tell me they wish every yacht had one. An aside: Commercial vessels hate being hailed on 16 for passing and meeting calls because they are all using 13 as their primary channel and are required, unlike recreational craft, to have it on a second radio which may be located farther out of reach and which they seldom use. Calling them on 13 tells them that you know your radio procedure. I now use 13 as my primary channel on the waterways because my sign will bring most passing calls in on it. If I need to talk to someone in a hurry, it will probably be a tug and barge coming unexpectedly around a bend. They don’t come around unexpectedly as much any more because I have been listening to 13 and hearing them all along.

      A big reason for using 13 is also that it defaults to low power so that you are not sharing your navigational discussions with boats 20-30 miles in each direction. 16 defaults to high power. Even if you know to hit the H/L button, every time most radios return to 16 from another channel to to scan or operator switch, 16 will be switched to 25 watts. Almost nobody, including myself, can remember to press H/L EVERY time before making a 16 transmission to a nearby boat or marina. Getting the waterway cruising community used to using 13 properly would eliminate a lot of 16 clutter. This would be of major benefit to vessels taking the outside route. They have to listen to the “This is the trawler behind the white sailboat. We hope you are having a very nice day and would like to know which side you would like us to pass on and whether you would like a slow pass.” drivel all the way down. I have had many tell me that the fear during the fall snowbird parade that they are afraid the could not get a distress heard in event of fire or sudden flooding. Just listening to it all day long is also annoying.

      After you have figured out your passing arrangements on 13, if you want to tell the other vessel how nice it is, talk about where they are going, etc., then it is time to switch to another working channel. If your initial call to a nearby vessel is not about passing, meeting, or other exchange of navigation information, then the initial hail should be on 16 followed by switching to a working channel.

      I’ve been massively flamed on the Internet for these thoughts but have yet to have one commercial professional disagree with me.

      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Tom Murphy -  November 9, 2019 - 10:09 pm

        Thank you for your post. I'm always telling people about doing this. I get a lot of guff for being a jerk. Another nice thing about monitoring 13 is that it improves your opinion of the human race.: People on 13 are almost universally polite and helpful.
        I especially remember one time at the Savannah River crossroads. Before I ever got anywhere near the river on the ICW, I knew, from listening to the radio, that there would be three ships passing at about the same time I would arrive and slowed down to avoid arriving early. Another boat near me wondered what I was doing and I explained. I told them it was always a good idea to monitor 13 on the ICW but they didn't think it was worthwhile for a yacht to do.

        Reply to Tom
    • Florida Inland Navigational District Community Outreach Event, Nov 15, Martin County, Stuart, FL


      Martin County Florida
       Fort Pierce City Marina 1 Avenue A, Ft. Pierce, FL 34950 Toll Free (800) 619-1780 (772) 464-1245 Facsimile (772) 464-2589

      At the intersection of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and the Okeechobee Waterway, Martin County, A CRUISERS NET SPONSOR, is a hub of boating activity and of events of interest to boaters.

       
      MIATC | PO Box 1639Stuart, FL 34997

      Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Intersection of AICW/Okeechobee Waterway

      Be the first to comment!

    • DECEMBER 2019 FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS, Fishermen’s Village, Charlotte Harbor, Punta Gorda, FL


      Punta Gorda, Florida - a GREAT cruising destination

      There is always much to do around Charlotte Harbor and the “Festival of Lights” is the perfect way to celebrate the Holiday season! While berthed at Fishermen’s Village Marina, A CRUISERS NET SPONSOR, you will enjoy visiting Western Florida’s beautiful Charlotte Harbor/Peace River.

      Festival of Lights December 2019 Calendar of events
      Kathy Burnam
      Marketing/Events Manager
      Fishermen’s Village
      mkting@fishville.com
      1200 W. Retta Esplanade #57A
      Punta Gorda, Florida 33950

      P 941 575-3007
      M 941 258-1327
      F 941 637-1054

      Click Here To View the Western Florida Cruisers’ Net Marina Directory Listing For Fishermen’s Village

      Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Fishermen’s Village

      Be the first to comment!

    • Good Words for Morehead City Yacht Basin, NC AICW Statute Mile 203


      Morehead City Yacht Basin

      Morehead City Yacht Basin, A CRUISERS NET SPONSOR, is located on the southern flank of the marked channel that runs west from Mile 203 of the Waterway, just north of the Morehead-Beaufort high-rise bridge. Our thanks to Bru Brubaker for these king words.

      We continue to stop at Morehead City Yacht Basin because of good protection, proximity of restaurants, GREAT dock hands, clean facility, good bathrooms, easy off and back on ICW, and the nice boaters who use this marina. If fueling and/or pumping out, pay attention to the floater in the basin; the depth is shallow outside it. The Ruddy Duck Restaurant has outstanding crispy duck in a serving large enough for lunch seconds the next day.
      Bru Brubaker

      Click Here To View the Cruisers Net North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Morehead City Yacht Basin

      Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Morehead City Yacht Basin

      Be the first to comment!

    • Open House 2019 – You’re invited! Nov 23, Bennett Brothers Yachts and Cape Fear Marina, Wilmington, NC, Cape Fear River


      Bennett Brothers, Luxury Yachts for Sale by Bennett Brothers Yachts

      Bennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina, A CRUISERS NET SPONSOR, is located on the eastern banks of the northeast Cape Fear River, just north of the Isabel Holmes – Highway 133 bascule bridge, and only a few steps from the downtown Wilmington waterfront.

      Click here for Open House 2019 – You’re invited!

      Click Here To View the North Carolina Cruiser’ Net’s Marina Directory Listing For Bennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina

      Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Bennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina

      Be the first to comment!

    • LNM: REMINDER: Channel 16 is Not for Chit Chat

      This is a reminder that is unneeded for most of boaters, but obviously there are still those, both amateur and professional, who do not know or respect the rules of the airwaves.


      MSIB 48-19 VHF Marine Channel 16 Designated for Emergency Calls Only – Sector Charleston, SC
      VHF Channel 16 (156.8MHz) is the international hailing and distress frequency. The Coast Guard continuously monitors CH 16 for any distress calls. Excessive chatter can impede Coast Guard response operations. Prohibited Channel 16 communications include: excessive chatter, obscene language, routine messages and radio tests. Mariners are reminded that prohibited radio chatter increases the risk of genuine distress calls being missed by response personnel. Automated radio checks can be conducted on VHF CH 26 and 27. Marinas can be reached on CH 12, 14, 68, and 69.

      This MSIB can be viewed at https://homeport.uscg.mil/port-directory/charleston. For questions or concerns, please contact the Sector’s 24-hour Command Center at (843) 740-7050.

      Comments from Cruisers (1)

      1. Roger Long on "Gypsy Star" -  November 9, 2019 - 8:07 am

        This also applies to passing and meeting discussions. Every vessel on waterways such as the ICW should be monitoring 13 as well as 16 for situational awareness about the bridges and what commercial traffic is doing. Few do so however so you will usually need to hail a vessel you are overtaking on 16 if you want to alert them. If your call is just, “Rover, this is Sea Queen passing you to port.” and all you need back it “Roger” or “Go Ahead”, then that is OK. However, if you want to ask which side, do they want a slow pass, etc., you should ask them to switch to another channel first. If someone overtaking you asks questions requiring more than a one word response, you should ask them to switch to another channel.

        Following frequent USCG admonishments a couple days ago, most ICW travelers were switching to 17 or 68 for passing discussions after an initial 16 hail. This is fine but it makes more sense to use the channel identified for the purpose. Contrary to urban legend, 13 is not a channel for commercial craft. It just sounds like it because professionals use it as intended. 13 is the Bridge (helm) to Bridge (helm) channel for exchange of navigational information between vessels in a common situation such as passing or meeting. If you listen to it in busy areas such as the Saint John River, you’ll learn that the professionals NEVER call each other on 16 first. A direct hail on 13 is appropriate and saves 16 clutter. The reason commercial vessels hail recreational vessel on 16 first is because they know most yacht drivers are ignorant and don’t waste time trying to get them the proper way first. In the Saint John River, if you listen, you’ll discover that the pilots almost always hail yachts on 13 first because they want to follow correct procedure. You can then hear the eye roll (another idiot) as they hail on 16 and ask for a switch to 13. I’ve often heard them tell yachts to please stay on 13 all the time they are in the river.

        We have a sign just below our name board that says, “Hail CH 13 to Pass”. It saves a lot of 16 airtime and button pushing. I monitor 16 (as legally required) via dual watch and switch to that for the few boats that ignore the sign. I have had many commercial professionals complement me on the sign and tell me they wish every yacht had one. An aside: Commercial vessels hate being hailed on 16 for passing and meeting calls because they are all using 13 as their primary channel and are required, unlike recreational craft, to have it on a second radio which may be located farther out of reach and which they seldom use. Calling them on 13 tells them that you know your radio procedure. I now use 13 as my primary channel on the waterways because my sign will bring most passing calls in on it. If I need to talk to someone in a hurry, it will probably be a tug and barge coming unexpectedly around a bend. They don’t come around unexpectedly as much any more because I have been listening to 13 and hearing them all along.

        A big reason for using 13 is also that it defaults to low power so that you are not sharing your navigational discussions with boats 20-30 miles in each direction. 16 defaults to high power. Even if you know to hit the H/L button, every time most radios return to 16 from another channel to to scan or operator switch, 16 will be switched to 25 watts. Almost nobody, including myself, can remember to press H/L EVERY time before making a 16 transmission to a nearby boat or marina. Getting the waterway cruising community used to using 13 properly would eliminate a lot of 16 clutter. This would be of major benefit to vessels taking the outside route. They have to listen to the “This is the trawler behind the white sailboat. We hope you are having a very nice day and would like to know which side you would like us to pass on and whether you would like a slow pass.” drivel all the way down. I have had many tell me that the fear during the fall snowbird parade that they are afraid the could not get a distress heard in event of fire or sudden flooding. Just listening to it all day long is also annoying.

        After you have figured out your passing arrangements on 13, if you want to tell the other vessel how nice it is, talk about where they are going, etc., then it is time to switch to another working channel. If your initial call to a nearby vessel is not about passing, meeting, or other exchange of navigation information, then the initial hail should be on 16 followed by switching to a working channel.

        I’ve been massively flamed on the Internet for these thoughts but have yet to have one commercial professional disagree with me.

        Reply to Roger
    • Bahamas Chatter: New Customs fees question

      Explorer Charts - the best charts for the Bahamas and Exumas

      Bahamas Chatter is produced by Explorer Chartbooks, A CRUISERS NET PARTNER, which has long been the standard navigational supplement for enjoyable, informative, and safe cruising through the beautiful Bahamian waters and island visits.

      Bahamas Chatter: New Customs fees question
      New Customs fees question

      Posted: 07 Nov 2019 02:09 PM PST

      I see the new fees for a 35 foot boat are $300 for three months and $600 for a year. What are the fees for 4 months?? Is it that you have three months at $300, then after that you have to pay for the entire year at $600 more or is it $300 more making it $600 for the year? If you are checking in and want to stay 4-5 months do you just pay the $600 for the year then?? Please only reply if you are sure of your answer. Thanks.
      PS I like the idea of reciprocating the US entry fee for Bahamian boats coming to the USA.

      Comments from Cruisers (3)

      1. Stephanie DiBelardino -  November 13, 2019 - 8:05 am

        I have confirmation from boaters that have recently arrived in the Bahamas that there are no changes to the cruising fees. No one knows what will happen in 2020. The Bahamian government has a history of announcing changes effective immediately.

        Stephanie Martino DiBelardino

        Reply to Stephanie
      2. Scott Coles -  November 8, 2019 - 1:46 pm

        Although none of this has been tested yet as I understand the new fees do not go into effect until January 2020 I would imagine that it would work much like before. When you check in you buy a cruising permit. In the past, that was good for a year and cost $xx. Now you only get 3 months for $xx or a year for twice that amount. So when you check in you should know which you want to purchase. Do not confuse the cruising permit which is "attached" to the vessel with a visa which is "attached" to the individual person(s). In the past we have been granted 150 day visas and other times the max that they would give was 90 days. The visa can be renewed by appearing in person at the appropriate place. For us this was in the Marsh Harbor government building. I don't know how that is working mow. It would be best to request as much time as you can get the first time so as not to need it renewed.

        Reply to Scott
      3. Stephanie DiBelardino -  November 8, 2019 - 1:44 pm

        I am a seasonal resident of Grand Bahama. I am making contacts now to get you the correct answer.

        Reply to Stephanie
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