Chart View Search

Search Waterway by Nautical Mile

Select Waterway:
Statute Mile:

(Min: 0nm Max: 1095nm)

Search by Latitude/Longtitude

Degrees/Minutes/Decimal Minutes Format
Degrees/Decimal Degrees Format
Latitude:
Longitude:
(Degrees/Decimal Degrees Format Only)

Latitude:
Deg:   Min/Dec. Min:   

Longitude:
Deg:   Min/Dec. Min:   

(Degrees/Minutes/Decimal Minutes Format Only)

Close
The Salty Southeast
Cruisers' Net
Cruisers Helping Cruisers

Archive For: NORTH CAROLINA – All Cruising News

  • Interesting Article on Ocracoke, NC (off the AICW, on Pamlico Sound)

    What a great report from Captains Greg and Susan concerning one of the North Carolina’s most popular ports of call. Note that this cruising duo note the same shoaling in the Big Foot Slough Channel, on which we reported last week, but they also reflect a later report of dredging here. Follow the link provided below to check out this earlier article.
    Even if you don’t plan on visiting Ocracoke this summer, Greg and Susan’s account of the “movie” in Ocracoke, plus the offshore research trip, is well worth a read!

    Allegria is spending and extended weekend at the USNPS docks in Ocracoke, NC. This idyllic village on the outer banks is the perfect place to enjoythe summer’s heat with a cooling breeze. The docks were only half full and we got a great spot along with enough power to be comforable with our A/C. Since we are over 62 years old we can use our Golden Passports here to get a 50% discount on the dockage, quite a bargain. The channel entering the Silver Lake anchorage was extremely shoaled with barely 6′ on the green side and seabirds walking around on the red side. Fortunately, there is an USACOE dredge working there right now.
    Last night in Ocracoke, there was a feature movie played right behind our boat on a big inflatable screen, of a Disney from 2009 entitled Oceans. It had some of the most spectacular wildlife footage I have ever seen. One scene in Alaska had a pod of grey whales herding bait fish into a ball using air bubbles. Then a dozen full grown grey whale exploded to the surface en-mass from deep down. The slow motion showed their mouths, which sieve out the fish from the water, bloated and distended with their catch as they fell back. Truly do not miss this film, it is unlike anything else I have ever seen. See some clips at http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0765128/
    There is an 85′ NOAA research vessel in residence which is working on a project to locate and photograph wrecks that are offshore from the Battle of the Atlantic, the extended battle between U boats and merchant and US Navy ships that resulted in dozen of sinkings in the early part of WWII. They have a sophisticated free ranging, self propelled side scan sonar device that they release to run track lines along the bottom. When retrieved, the data can be downloaded and reviewed. This is much easier than towing the device behind a ship and running track lines. The National Geographic has a film crew documenting the project so look for a future piece on TV and in print. This is related to the Marine Sanctuary program of NOAA surrounding the Monitor archeological site just offshore.
    Greg and Susan Han
    USCG 100GT Master, Near Coastal
    Key Biscayne, FL
    Allegria — Krogen Whaleback #16

    Click Here To Read An Earlier Article About Shoaling and New Dredging on Ocracoke’s Big Foot Slough Channel

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Ocracoke’s National Park Service Docks

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Ocracoke’s Anchorage Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Ocracoke’s Silver Lake Harbor and Its Approach Channels

  • Good Words for Cypress Cove Marina, off Albemarle Sound, Columbia, NC

    Cypress Cove Marina, formerly International Yaching Center, formerly Sawyers Marina, sits on the banks of the beautiful Scuppernong River, near the tiny river town of Columbia, NC.

    Cypress Cove has a nice lift, and nice “ramp” area for boats to sit on the hard for maintenance or storage. Something important to me personally is toilet and shower facilities; I rate Cypress Cove’s facilities above average. My experience is getting a bit dated; I was there over the Winter 2007/2008. The maintenance was first class. Very small staff, but it is/was plenty, professional and proficient. Other than being careful of wind/water depth, I rate this marina at excellent. It is best to call ahead since dockage was almost full. When I was in the water I was tied to a temporary end-of-pier spot; which was very adequate since the marina is in a very protected cove. Unless someone has recently moved or is out cruising, I doubt there are any empty slips. They are a dealer for power boats, so the lean may seem a bit toward the power yachter, however, that is where the money is so I see no problem there. Can’t see anyone staying in business in this region if they specialized in sail. The maintenance “person” was knowledgeable of both power and sailing craft.
    Skipper Mark H.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Cypress Cove Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Cypress Cove Marina

    Click Here For An Article on Columbia, NC

  • Elizabeth City Gets Better and Better, Dismal Swamp Route, Statute Mile 50.5

    Click to learn more about our Carolina Loop programElizabeth City and the Rose Buddies have been charming cruising visitors to the City Docks since 1983. Over 15 years ago, my family and I were privileged to meet the original Rose Buddy, Fred Fearing, who passed away in 2007, and we got the same warm greeting and assistance as did Ken and Francie. Isn’t it wonderful that some things do not change! The city docks are officially called Mariner’s Wharf City Docks and dockage is free for 48 hours, although we were once allowed to stay for three days when high winds prevented the Alligator River Bridge from opening. We are proud to report that Elizabeth, NC is A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    Elizabeth City has major improvements for boaters since our last stop a few years ago, thanks to former mayor Atkinson who now owns a trawler. Enjoy Saturday morning farmer’s market at mariner wharf May – October. Farm Fresh market, a great new grocery store, picks boaters up at the wharf with a phone call. We enjoyed First Friday gallery walk and new art center downtown. The new library and Albermarle museum exhibits are terrific. We highly recommend Elizabeth City to anyone cruising the area.
    Capt. Wendy Young aboard “Blue Crab” 32′ Island Gypsy, Punta Gorda FL

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Elizabeth City’s Mariners’ Wharf City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Elizabeth City Waterfront

  • Another Great Report on Deep Point Marina (Statute Mile 307, AICW/Cape Fear River)

    910-269-2380 The new 82-slip Deep Point Marina is located on the Cape Fear River in Southport, NC, and offers fuel and transient dockage, as well as daily, monthly and annual slip rentals. The marina is adjacent to the new Bald Head Island Ferry Terminal, which houses a snack bar (open seasonally) that offers grab-and-go food options, soft drinks, beer, wine and coffee. In addition, the Deep Point Marina is convenient to Southport's shopping, restaurants and historic district, and offers easy ocean access. One of the Cruisers’ Net’s newest sponsors, Deep Point Marina keeps racking up the good reviews. This facility’s marked entry channel lies northwest of Cape Fear River/AICW marker #20.

    We just left . . . the Deep Point Marina.WHAT A GREAT STOP. We recommend the Marina.The docking price is right $1.14 a foot,with free laundry and swimming pool.Their organization donated hundreds
    of dollars worth of door prizes to the southern [MTOA] rendezvous.Please stop and say hello.Located of the Cape fear river at red marker #20,next to the Bald Head Island ferry.The bald Head Conservatory has been very kind to MTOA.Try and support them.
    George Kay

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Deep Point Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Deep Point Marina

  • More Good Words for Deep Point Marina, AICW Statute Mile 307

    910-269-2380 The new 82-slip Deep Point Marina is located on the Cape Fear River in Southport, NC, and offers fuel and transient dockage, as well as daily, monthly and annual slip rentals. The marina is adjacent to the new Bald Head Island Ferry Terminal, which houses a snack bar (open seasonally) that offers grab-and-go food options, soft drinks, beer, wine and coffee. In addition, the Deep Point Marina is convenient to Southport's shopping, restaurants and historic district, and offers easy ocean access. Deep Point Marina is reached via a marked entry channel northwest of Cape Fear River/AICW marker #20. These good people are one of our newest Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net sponsors

    4/19/11- Stopped at Deep Point on our way North from St. Augustine Fl to Portsmouth NH. This is on its way to being a nice stop. Everyone was friendly and helpful. Once all the amenities are done we will be back. Very protected, good stop in bad weather.
    Capt Glenn Kiedaisch

    Thanks to Cruisers Net we found a new jewel of a marina. In Southport, NC we “just went in for fuel” to the new Deep Point marina because we noted a very good price on fuel. Rob the marina dock master made us feel so at home that we ended up staying two nights and the price was right. $1.14/ft. with our Boat US discount. The baths and showers were extra clean and new, the pool looked great and the staff was so friendly and helpful. We definitely will be returning. The people can make or break the marina experience.
    Thank you Cruisers Net for keeping us informed and helping us to save some money on fuel and I am sure this service helps to spur competition in the fuel market. I know that we don’t even consider buying fuel from a marina who will not respond to your price inquires. Keep up the great work.
    Capt’n Joe aboard S/V C-Note

    We just left The FLETCHERS at the Deep Point Marina.WHAT A GREAT STOP.Chuck and Joy are super friends and Port Captains.We recommend the Marina and a hello to Chuck and Joy.The docking price is right $1.14 a foot,with free laundry and swimming pool.Their organization donated hundreds of dollars worth of door prizes to the southern rendezvous.Please stop and say hello.Located of the Cape fear river at red marker #20,next to the Bald Head Island ferry.The Bald Head Conservatory has been very kind to MTOA.Try and support them.
    George Kay

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Deep Point Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Deep Point Marina

  • High Praise for River Dunes Marina, AICW Statute Mile 173.5

    River DunesRiver Dunes Marina, A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR, is located off the AICW’s run along Neuse River, in Broad Creek between unlighted daybeacons #1 and #2.

    Stayed at River Dunes Marina just north of Oriental. What a delight! Lovely main building with billiards, great library, super sailing photos of J boats and a great Rest. (Thurs-Sun). New tile heads, laundry, great pool and cabanas, hot tubs, workout room and even croquet on the lawn. New floating docks and $1,50/’. Free courtesy van with Oriental a 15 min. drive. Manager, CJ, is a delight as is the facility. Next time we’ll spend two or three days. A real “resort” atmosphere at a good price. Try it – you’ll like it! Cheers from Queen Ann’s Revenge @ Okracoke,
    Hank Evans

    River Dunes is a real treat! Dont pass it up and plan on staying a week.
    Knot tide down

    Cruising News:
    After reading and hearing all the positive comments regarding River Dunes Marina up the Broad Creek north of Oriental, we were looking forward to the possibility of spending some of our summer cruising season with them. When we contacted the Dock Master and inquired about transient monthly rates we were informed that River Dunes has a ‘no live-aboard policy’ for stays in excess of one week. Oh well, I guess we’ll be looking elsewhere to spend a month.
    Linda Bernabucci M/V Live Wire II Selene 43

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For River Dunes Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of River Dunes Marina

  • News from Morehead City Docks, AICW Statute Mile 205

    In the heart of downtown, the City docks are on the northern banks of the Morehead City waterfront channel, west of Morehead Gulf Docks. Reservations are made by calling 252-726-2457, but payment is made at the City Library one block from the waterfront at 9th and Evans.

    City Docks at Morehead City. Not in Waterway Guide yet. $1.50/’ including elect. Heads and showers. Pay at City Library or on phone by credit card. To book reservation call the City Library @ 252-726-3012.
    Hank Evans aboard Queen Ann’s Revenge

    Ted Garner, owner of Sanitary Seafood is a friend of ours and a MTOA port capt. He has made some renovations including putting a full service bar at the restaurant in addition to the outside deck. He is just waiting for the permits to put in a new floating dock at the restaurant which he hopes will be in by the end of June. So be patient it will come. In addition, he is a very accommodating port capt. for those who plan to be in the area and need any assistance.
    Jane Deane

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Morehead City Municipal Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Morehead City Docks

  • Report on Wilmington City Docks, Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

    The historic city of Wilmington, on the Cape Fear River about 11.5 miles off the AICW, has worked long and hard over the past decade to update their waterfront, and make it more visitor and cruiser friendly. While there is still room for improvement, cruising visitors will now find some good city docks in the heart of the downtown business/historic district, and a very fine private marina/yacht manufacturer/repair yard, a bit farther upstream.

    Wilmington City Docks: $1.50/’ plus elect. Public restrooms- locked after hours, no showers, no laundry. Hilton Hotel has new manager and cruisers staying at town docks in front of hotel are no longer welcome at Hilton pool and restrooms. Overpriced for what they deliver, but still a delightful stop. Caprice Rest. on Market St. very good steaks and service. Upstairs, quiet and delightful.
    Skipper Hank Evans aboard Queen Anne’s Revenge

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Wilmington City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Wilmington City Docks

  • Bridge Tender Marina, AICW Statute Mile 280

    Bridge Tender Marina in Wrightsville Beach, NC is located on the western side of the Waterway immediately south of the Wrightsville Beach bascule bridge (S.R. 74).

    Stayed here on May 24 2011. They no longer have showers. No laundry, lounge, showers or boater facilities. You get cable, electric and water for $1.75. Nice and close to bascule bridge that only opens hourly.
    Kerry Appleton

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Bridge Tender Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Bridge Tender Marina

  • Good Words for the Carolina Beach State Park Marina, AICW Statute Mile 297

    The long awaited remodeling and reopening of this fine facility has happened! The State Park entrance channel cuts off from the AICW, at the western end of Snows Cut, between markers #163 and #165.

    We are currently docked at Carolina Beach State Park at the west end of Snows Cut (ICW mile 292.5). Price $30/day w/240 electric and water. All new floating docks. After you enter the basin, getting into the slip is tight but not a problem. Overall we are about 48 feet and were able to fit into the slip with some hangover front and back.
    We are the only boat on one of the three docks and there are only 3 other boats in the 54 slip marina. It’s restful, clean and a worthwhile stop.
    The construction is very well done and they were able to leave just about enough room between piers so that we could fit across the fairway. You could get a 45 footer in to the 17′ wide slips and the only problem would be the wind. Twins or a bow or stern thruster would make it easier.
    Skipper Jim Bertch

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Carolina Beach State Park

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Carolina Beach State Park

  • Pungo Creek Marina, AICW/Pungo River, Statute Mile 136

    Recently re-opened this past spring, Pungo Creek Marina, ocated on Pungo Creek just south of Belhaven, NC, continues to make upgrades to a fine facility.

    Pungo Creek Marina update: The ships store is now up and operating, along with wifi covering the entire docks. The new dock rates are 50.00 a night, and the size of the vessel doesn’t matter. There is also a nice t-dock to lay up on, as well as easy access to the fuel pumps. (5-17-11)
    Capt. Larry

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Pungo Creek Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Pungo Creek Marina

  • Report on Mile Hammock Bay Anchorage, AICW Statute Mile 244.5

    Mile Hammock Bay anchorage lies just off the AICW, hard by (just north of) the Waterway’s intersection with New River and New River Inlet.
    Mile Hammock Bay lies within the sprawling Camp Lejeune US Marine Base, and Corps activities can sometimes disrupt anchorage by pleasure craft in these waters, occasionally to the point where you can not drop the hook here at all.

    We anchored there for the night on the 4th. Four other boats, plenty of room. The Marines were doing touch and goes with a tiltrotor nearby and then at about 11:00pm they went to work with more Helos and made a whole lot of NOISE for about an hour and then it was quiet the rest of the night.
    We anchor there twice a year. Once in a while they do amphibious exercises and it can be in the middle of the night and they sometimes make serious wakes doing it, so it’s a good idea to get all your knick knacks secure.
    I used to live on short final south of the Glenview Naval Air Station when they were still flying Privateers and Cougars, both LOUD. I can sleep through anything as a result, so I’m not bothered by the noise. Besides, their noise is for our benefit – bless them.
    The holding is not uniformly good around the anchorage as you will see if the wind gets stronger. Bottom is muck on top of hardpan and if you are where the muck is thinner, more on the east side, you may not get the holding you think you have. We always back down and sometimes switch anchors fluke to plow and it often takes two or three tries to get it to stick.
    If you use the place, and there is any threat of serious wind, keep an eye on what your neighbors are doing with respect to anchoring and if it isn’t adequate, move. we’ve twice moved out of what turned out to be the path of boats dragging up the Marines’ ramp.
    All this notwithstanding, we love the place and use it because it’s the only place that makes any sense between pipeline and adams creek beach given our 6 knot speed.
    We don’t anchor in wrightsville beach anymore. The current and any serious wind make the place tricky and if you don’t really know what you are doing getting secure holding can be difficult. Again, it’s not you, it’s the neighbours – you’ll know who they are. “Rope” rodes and at most 25 foot scope.
    Skipper John Ferguson aboard m/v arcadian

    On rare occasions the Marines do close the anchorage. We came past a few days ago and they were doing helicopter maneuvers but there were boats anchored in the basin. So the answer is, it depends.
    Capt. Chuck

    We anchored in Mile Hammock Bay last night, May 18th. Very nice anchorage. We had no problem holding in 15 mph winds. Winds died overnight. There were some small camo boats the marines were practicing maneuvering when we came in but they were over by the boat ramp, no problem. Not much else going on. Four boats total in the anchorage. We recommend it.
    Skipper Steve Franko aboard Yesterday’s Dream

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Anchorage Directory Listing For Mile Hammock Bay Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Mile Hammock Bay

  • Bennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina Needs Support From the Cruising Community (Cape Fear River – Wilmington, NC)

    Bennett Brothers, Luxury Yachts for Sale by Bennett Brothers YachtsBennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina is a superb marina and repair yard facility near downtown Wilmington, NC, on the Cape Fear River. These good folks are also a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR.
    Ms. Tricia Bennett, President of this fine organization, has asked the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net to help rally support within the cruising community to obtain the necessary permits to dredge their facility. It’s my understanding the state has already approved, but now they need a little help with the “fed boys.”

    Dear Claiborne:
    I am writing to see if we get some support from your cruising community for maintenance dredging at the Cape Fear Marina. As you know, we been located on the Northeast Cape Fear River since 1997 and some of the slips have silted in. We have applied for all the permits required and it is now time to get some public support! We are not looking to expand the marina, just make sure all the slips have enough water. Details of the entire permit process and background can be found at www.saw.usace.army.mil/wetlands.. We are an NC Certified Clean Marina and want to make sure we can accommodate folks in all our slips! .
    Letters supporting our marina maintenance dredging can be sent by mail to:
    Mr. Dave Timpy
    Wilmington District
    Corps of Engineers
    69 Darlington Avenue
    Wilmington, NC 28402
    Thanks very much for spreading the word. We really appreciate it!
    Best Regards,

    Tricia
    Patricia Donovan Bennett
    President
    BENNETT BROTHERS YACHTS, INC.
    Cape Fear Marina

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Cape Fear Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Bennett Brothers Yachts/Cape Fear Marina

  • A Visit to Joyner Marina, AICW Statute Mile 295

    Joyner Marina has risen from the one-time location of Oceanic Marina and is found almost due east of the AICW’s eastern entrance into Snows Cut.

    Docked early in the day here. we biked to the beach (within walking distance) and then had a good lunch at Sea Witch (about a 2 mile ride). Marina offers 25 cent a foot discount for Boat Us.
    Ron & Audrey aboard Lucky Girl

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Joyner Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Joyner Marina

    Click Here To View An Earlier Article on Joyner Marina

  • New Fans of Elizabeth City, NC, Dismal Swamp Route, Statute Mile 50.5

    Click to learn more about our Carolina Loop programElizabeth City and the Rose Buddies have been charming cruising visitors to the City Docks since 1983. Over 15 years ago, my family and I were privileged to meet the original Rose Buddy, Fred Fearing, who passed away in 2007, and we got the same warm greeting and assistance as did Ken and Francie. Isn’t it wonderful that some things do not change! The city docks are officially called Mariner’s Wharf City Docks and dockage is free for 48 hours, although we were once allowed to stay for three days when high winds prevented the Alligator River Bridge from opening. We are proud to report that Elizabeth, NC is A SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    We are presently in Elizabeth City and have found the city to be a very warm and friendly place. The Rose Buddies met us at the FREE dock and we were helped to dock and invited to wine and cheese as well as helpful info about the city. i was taken by a member to get propane cheers and fuel. He would not accept anything. We had a wonderful time visiting with the Rose Buddies and gained much info about the city, museum, and places to shop. We had a great meal at Groupers and a fine lunch at Quality Sea Food . This afternoon we visited the Museum and spent much time going through their quality exhibits. This is a must stop for anyone traveling the AICW and the Dismal Swamp.
    Ken & Francie Bushee

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Mariners’ Wharf City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Mariner’s Wharf City Docks

  • Important Navigational News for AICW Problem Stretch at the Northern Mouth of Alligator River, AICW Statute Mile 80

    Due to a combination of shoaling and incorrect depiction of aids to navigation on some older editions of chart 11553, the intersection of the AICW and the northern mouth of Alligator River has gained the reputation of being currently the worst AICW problem stretch on the Tar Heel coastline. Fortunately, below Captains Chuck and George give good advice on how to successfully navigate these troubled waters, and the second posting below notes the replacement of destroyed marker #7, reported earlier here on the Cruisers’ Net, with a temporary, unlighted can buoy. The USCG has thankfully added a red nun buoy marker #8A and if you follow the advice below, you should have no problem, but cross your fingers and toes anyway.

    Claiborne,
    Beach House transited the mouth of the Alligator River yesterday and here is what we found. On the red side between R “6″ and “8″, even near the markers we had 9 feet. The green side is deeper with 12 feet holding about 75 feet off G “7″ and going to G “9″, again holding off about 75 feet. The marker for G “9″ has been replaced and is in fine condition. The Coast Guard has placed a red nun, R “8A” where everyone has cut through and run aground. So if the markers are followed correctly there is no reason for anyone to run aground. We will keep you posted on any further developments. From Norfolk to Adams Creek we have found nothing but good depths. We are heading south.
    Chuck

    Cruising News:
    Hi guys…was at the Alligator River Marina earlier this week and there is a new nun buoy 8a that has been placed in the ICW channel just south of daymarker #8. Heading north this should be left to port but there is good water right next to the marker in the channel. I expect it is there to keep people off the shoal to the west. You may want to follow up with the CG on this…but it was there on 5/15! All best…
    Capt. George Barr

    We passed northbound through this North Alligator River section discussed here this morning – May 1. It is important for cruisers to know that Flashing Green “7″ has been destroyed and has been replaced by the CG with an unlighted small Green can. This “7″ Green can is hard to see as you approach from the South, but is positioned exactly as the old light since about 2′ of the old pole is above the water next to it. All the advice here about getting near Green “9″ and running to Green “7″ and keeping well off of Red “8″ is right on the money. We saw 11 feet or more at all times. We heard a motor cruiser who said he ran the Magenta Line report 3′ and a near grounding.

    Click Here To View An Earlier Posting about the AICW/Northern Alligator River Problem Stretch, That Also Gives Good Navigational Advice For These Waters

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Northern Alligator River

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch at the Northern Mouth of Alligator River

  • More Problems At AICW/Northern Mouth of Alligator River (near Statute Mile 81)

    Belhaven Waterway Marina is located on Pantego Creek in Belhaven Harbor at the 135 Mile marker on the Intracoastal Waterway We are in the center of downtown Belhaven just a short walk from the HardwarI have lost count of the number of postings we’ve had here on the Net about the Waterway’s run through the northern mouth of broad Alligator River, just as this stream meets up with Albemarle Sound. That’s why, some time ago, we designated these waters as an “AICW Problem Stretch.”
    If you will be traversing this stretch of the AICW anytime soon, be SURE to follow the link below to our listing of these waters in our AICW Problem Stretch section.
    Thanks to Captain Mason for his very kind words concerning the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net. Yes, indeed, as the spring 2011 spring migration goes forward, PLEASE help us get the word out to our fellow cruisers about the quantity and quality of info available here on the Net, and all at no charge, without the need for a users name or password!

    Hi Claiborne,
    Here is a try of your new address. I hope you are feeling much better. The following was told to me by a good friend, and it is about his friend.
    This person was coming up Alligator River, heading into Albemarle Sound. He was running twenty five knots in a 47 foot Eastbay. You guessed it, he was following the magenta line on his chart and chartplotter, and hit bottom at the curve just south of number 7 and 8. The impact tore his engines off their mounts and destroyed props, shafts and rudders. The damage estimate is above $50,000. He was fortunate not to be seriously injured.
    For the few minutes it takes to review your website before each day’s run, such hazards can hopefully be avoided. We now find many cruisers who have internet access on their vessels with aircards. This issue has been noted on your website for years now, including a post from me. This area is also well covered in various publications. I really wish we in the cruising community could get the information out better about your incredibly valuable website. It is hard for me to believe that there are still a few cruisers out there who do nothing but look at the charts and their chartplotter. Fortunately most we talk to review your website as much as I do. I wonder if a flag with a logo of your website could be made available. It might prompt questions from the few who do not know of it. I would be proud to pay for and fly such a flag.
    Recently, we were returning to Norfolk from our favorite marina, Belhaven Waterway Marina, after some work there, and were followed through this area by a 42 foot Krogen. This person had softly hit bottom here on the way south.
    I led him through, and told him about your website, which he was aware of, but had not reviewed. I think he will now.
    Again, I wish you all the best.
    With warm regards,
    Norman Mason
    Peggy Sue, Monk 36

    This just brings to mind something a tugboat captain once told me about the ICW. He said to drive the markers not the chart-keep the yellow squares (usually on the green side) to starboard and the yellow triangles (usually on the red side) to port. This would have prevented that damage to the Eastbay. We now have a very happy shipyard! This group on Facebook is providing some very useful intelligence on our migration once again. A great service to ICW users. Keep up the posting.
    The above is for heading North-the addendum was to keep the green markers between you and the ocean. Reverse this for heading south.
    Also,
    To run aground on this point your going to have to pass to the WEST of the red marker on the tip of the point of land that sticks out from the west bank of the Alligator River-pretty dumb if you ask me…If you look at the markers not the chart you will be fine. Also if your not sure where your supposed to be then stop. Your supposed to pass between the red and green. It just makes a little turn here around the sand bar…..I see a boat in trouble here every trip.
    The hardest thing for a captain to do is slow down.
    Tedd Greenwald

    Transited this area in early April this year with an experienced crewmember. Like me he “refers” to the chartplotter but “uses” his eyes. We cleared this area with no trouble but unfortunately watched a boat behind us go aground!!!
    Capt. Larry Weiss

    I’m the Eastbay that made the mistake of relying upon the magenta line and thought I’d offer some reflections, in hopes of helping others. I sincerely wish I had known of this site [Cruisers’ Net] and will do a LOT more research in the future, including spending hours of bandwidth here. I am relatively new to cruising and unfortunately believed (ignorantly so) that I could rely on current charts. I guess my many years of flying taught me to religiously count on them, especially when they are current. Nuff said and believe me, it won’t happen again.
    My approach speed was closer to 18 kts right before entering the dog leg past the green 9. I slowed to about 15 entering the turn (NE) when the ground started coming up. There were no boats ahead of me to notice any other course.
    The depth finder said 5′ (below the hull) and then 3 so I immediately shut down the props to idle. There was a large hit, but not really a grounding. I heard a “metal on metal” sound. We were completely stopped but floating (albeit just barely). I could feel the keel bouncing on a hard surface as the chop ran by.
    My starboard engine was all that was affected and appears to have taken the full hit; pulling the engine off it’s mount and slightly moving the strut. There is no damage, not even a scratch, to the hull. The starboard prop and shaft were moved 8-10″ aft and the prop was impacting the rudder… possibly the “metal on metal” sound. The port engine, strut, prop and shaft were fine.
    A couple of boats came by, about 100 yds east of my location, both going from green 9 to green 7 and said they were in good water. I was facing due east at the time as the tide and chop continued to rotate me about a point. It was clear the starboard prop was hung up on something hard.
    Using the port engine and bow thruster, I was able to slowly continue to rotate (until facing due west) and back off whatever the starboard prop was sitting on, eventually getting to the line between the green 9 and green 7, which is the preferred course.
    We motored to the Alligator Marina (nice people who know quite well what the problem area is… saying they see 2-3 every month) and the next morning was able to get it to a marina for repairs. At present, I have no estimate for repairs but am confident it’ll be a lot less than $50k, but in any event. it was clearly my fault for not researching the area more.
    I guess I just wanted to weigh in and admit my error and at the same time, correct the rumors which do seem to get a bit out of hand.
    Finally, it seems like even in this period of “no money Corps” that the preferred course on charts and chartplotters could be simply adjusted for these kinds of areas when it’s apparently been known for a long time that a problem with a magenta line exists. I realize they don’t have funds to dredge, but it doesn’t seem like changing charts would be difficult since the cost is ours when we buy updates.
    Well, while I was a pilot, we used to say there were only two kinds, “those who have landed gear up; and those who have yet to..” I guess the same goes for boating and I’m now in the former.
    Cheers, Jerry

    I can’t help myself – I just have to ask – why are people so obsessed with that magenta line? It seems to be a dangerous habit – as we’ve seen with the two prior postings – so why do people depend on something drawn by an unknown (who knows who drew it, or when, or what their capabilities were at the time, or just how outdated the information is)? Far better to use your eyes, your instruments and your charts to determine your own best course.

    Jerry replies:

    Capt Smith:
    I guess, to answer your question, “why are people are so obsessed with that magenta line” it’s because that’s the ONLY true aid to navigation available when you’re unfamiliar with the area. The question seems to insinuate that someone is wearing blinders and not scanning the terrain. In my opinion, I find that insinuation (at least in this instance) to be an easy attack, a bit loose and off the mark.
    In the Alligator River instance, clearly the magenta line was drawn with a dogleg for a reason AND it continues to be the OFFICIAL recommended course (which clearly needs to be changed). The chart specifies that the magenta line is defined as “Channel, course, track recommended”. There is NO PHYSICAL evidence out there when cruising that magenta line that would cause you to question the recommended and charted course. Only having been there, talking to others or reading this site would allow you to know not to follow the course specifically. That’s called “prior knowledge” and can’t be gained by looking around.
    I have also experienced a pretty bad grounding with another Captain who decided NOT to follow a doglegged magenta line (outside of Pensacola on the ICW), choosing instead to head directly from green to green. Just as in the Alligator River instance, there was NO PHYSICAL evidence available that suggested anything out of the ordinary. He used his “eyes” and not the chart… Was that wrong as well?
    I now know the Alligator River problem area pretty well. BUT, I would very much disagree that short of prior knowledge, nothing out there exists that would cause anyone to question the chart and proceed straight from green 9 to green 7, in DIRECT CONFLICT with the latest publication of a charted course.
    In my instance, I did exactly as you suggested,,, “used my eyes, instruments AND charts”. If there was anything out there that would have caused my eyes to question the instruments and finally the charts, I’d like to have it pointed out. It doesn’t exist. The ONLY reason not to follow that magenta line is to have prior knowledge, of which I claim sole personal and painful responsibility.
    Would we be having this same discussion if I posted the Pensacola grounding I spoke of? What about a time when a grounding occurs because you didn’t follow the magenta line?. I’ll wager an insurance company will be MUCH more difficult to deal with in getting the repairs accomplished in that instance. How can you explain a bad grounding when you’re OFF the magenta line? In my background, THAT would be called “Pilot Error”.
    Bottom line is, the magenta line is the best that we have, when lacking any other physical evidence. And in this instance at least, that line needs to be changed so that those of us who have never been there before can safely navigate the area without “prior knowledge”.
    Jerry

    I didn’t intend to point a finger at you [Jerry] in particular…. it was more of a generic comment. When I look at a chart, I guess you could say that I’m colorblind when it comes to that magenta line. It never enters into my line of sight – I don’t even see it. Never have, and never will.
    Capt. Mike Smith

    Claiborne, Beach House transited the mouth of the Alligator River yesterday and here is what we found. On the red side between R “6″ and “8″, even near the markers we had 9 feet. The green side is deeper with 12 feet holding about 75 feet off G “7″ and going to G “9″, again holding off about 75 feet. The marker for G “9″ has been replaced and is in fine condition. The Coast Guard has placed a red nun, R “8A” where everyone has cut through and run aground. So if the markers are followed correctly there is no reason for anyone to run aground. We will keep you posted on any further developments. From Norfolk to Adams Creek we have found nothing but good depths. We are heading south.
    Captain Chuck

    May 10, 2011
    Interesting discussion and i’m glad the incident with the East Bay wasn’t too serious.
    Couple of points i’d like to make, which apply not just to the Alligator River but to the entire ICW.
    1)- Watch the charts and look for the location of ATONs and how far off the channel they are located. How many time do we hear stories or read comments about someone running aground inside Green or Red XXX? being between the sticks isn’t enough… there are many places where the marker is way off centerline and actually sits in pretty skinny water.
    Look for shoals near an ATON and if it comes close or extends into the “channel”, take this into account to give that spot a little extra clearance.
    Look for creeks, especially near inlets. This is often where shoaling will take place. A good example of this is the stretch just north of the Ben Sawyer Bridge in Charleston. Breach Inlet and its small creeks doens’t seem like much yet at every intersection you will find some shoaling (as much as 7′ MLW right now)
    2) the Magic-enta Line is a guideline, a suggestion. Usually this is where dredging will be done, and it’s also where most tugs are likely to run, making it the most likely places to find the deeper water. But, there is no guarantee and again look for signs of trouble like marker locations as mentioned previuosly, but also things like side creeks bringing silt into the channel, doglegs, etc…
    typically when approaching a known or possible trouble spot, I will first try the magic-enta line but will take it slow and watch my sounder, often poking on either side for best water if depth decrease on the line.
    3)- your depth sounder is your most critical instrument! more important that your radar and fancy GPS overlay, and maybe even more important than your plotter. Make sure you know where the transducer is and how much you have under the transducer. Props for a power vessel, keel for a sailboat. If you set an offset, make sure it’s accurate and make a note of it.
    Use the shallow depth alarm. Mine is set at 9′ (for a boat with a 6 1/4 draft). While the bottom can come up faster, it can alert you and save a prop!
    4)- In doubt, take it slow. again, watch your depths and the charts. If something doesn’t look right on the charts (see nr 1 above), slow down! Typically, when i get down to 10′, I slow down to fast idle. At 9′, I go to slow idle and if it really gets below 9′ I start coming in and out of gear. (again with a 6+ draft). At such low speed, I usually have enough time to throw the boat in reverse and back out of seriously shallowing water before hitting anything. The boat i run doens’t have the luxury of a keel and has 3′ props hanging off the bottom!
    5)- And above all, use the tides! usually, just 1 to 2 feet of tide is all you need to make transiting some of the worst stretches a less stressful experience. While sometimes schedule constraints may get in the way it’s often possible to get 6 to 8 hours of running with enough tide to enjoy the trip.
    Pascal aboard MY Charmer, 70′ 6+ draft

    Question from Jerry:
    Is the “Red 8A” placed on the east side of the shoal area?
    Just curious graphically where they placed it. If so, it seems like they’ll HAVE to modify the magenta line on the charts as that would place it west of the channel and the new “Red 8A”. Thanks for the update.
    Jerry

    Red “8A” is about half way between G “7” and G “9” marking the starboard side of the channel going south or the port side heading north. Chuck

    And since the shoaling is from the west, we assume that Red Marker 8A has been placed east of the shoaling. There would be very little dogleg remaining.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For Northern Alligator River

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Recommended Hair Salon in Beaufort, NC, AICW Statute Mile 204

    After several weeks of fighting the briny, there’s nothing like a good hair salon or barber shop to make us feel human again. Thanks, Barbara, for your recommendation!

    I went to a great Hair Salon this week right on the water by the Beaufort city marina. Go to Jack Best Hair Salon, 412 Front Street. I had my hair colored and cut by Ron Hux; he did a great job and I would highly recommend the salon. You can reach Ron at 252-728-0951. It is a small shop so you may want to call ahead for an appointment.
    Barbara Cordello

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Beaufort, NC

  • Queen Anne’s Revenge Exhibit in Beaufort, NC, AICW Statute Mile 204

    In 1718, the notorious pirate Blackbeard lost his flagship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, when it ran aground in Beaufort Inlet. The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort reveals the treasures and mysteries of Blackbeard’s flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, with a new exhibit opening June 2011. The exhibit illuminates the life of pirates aboard the ship from 1717 to 1718, with artifacts, interactive features and fun facts. The museum is located at 315 Front St on Beaufort’s waterfront and is free to the public.

    For those of you heading through NC, in Beaufort on June 11 will be the Opening Exhibit of the recovery of Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge from the Beaufort Inlet.

    http://www.ncmaritimemuseums.com/beaufort.html
    http://www.beaufort-nc.com
    http://www.historicbeaufort.com
    http://www.beaufort-nc.com/
    Frank & Chris Erwin MTOA #2214

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Beaufort, NC

  • Beaufort Public Library in New Location, Beaufort, NC AICW Statute Mile 204

    The Carteret County Library in Beaufort, NC has moved to a new location: 1702 Live Oak Street, Suite 100, Beaufort, NC 28516-6139, Phone: (252) 728-2050. http://carteret.cpclib.org. While not within walking distance from the marinas, bicycling might be possible. Live Oak Street is Hwy 70, running east and northeast through Beaufort. And remember that Beaufort Municipal Docks has a courtesy car.

    The library in Beaufort has moved out of town and is no longer in walking distance of any of the marinas.
    Lee Beere

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Beaufort Municipal Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Beaufort Municipal Docks

Cruising News and Reference Directories
Boat Broker Partners