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Archive For: NORTH CAROLINA – All Cruising News

  • Comments on Beaufort Municipal Docks, AICW Statute Mile 201

    This is not the first unhappiness with prices at the Municipals Docks we have had expressed here – see first link below for some price comparisons. Price can easily be blamed on the economy, but attitude and service should never be compromised. Despite such dockage problems, the town of Beaufort, NC is still known as a real success story along the Waterway and this wonderful port of call remains one of our favorites, anytime, anywhere! And, as Capt. Winter points out, a “must see”!

    The town marina [Municipal Docks] was always a must stop for us as we go north/south (note we live in NC). Their reputation is now better than actual, as we have watched this place go up in cost while not maintaining facilities, but more importantly, bad attitudes from the staff. Staff especially are getting bad reputation up/down the ICW. We now go to Morehead City where all the marinas/restaurants are working hard for business. Beaufort is a must see town, but there are other places to dock in order to see the town. The savings on dockage will more than pay for a cab.
    John Winter

    Click Here To View An Earlier Article on Price Angst in Beaufort

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Beaufort Municipal Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Beaufort Municipal Docks

  • Praise for East and South Lake Anchorages, AICW Statute Mile 82

    The entrance to East Lake and South Lake anchorages lies along the AICW/Alligator River’s easterly shoreline, east of flashing daybeacon #10. We strongly suggest that you NOT attempt to access this anchorage without a well functioning GPS chartplotter aboard. A portion of the approach runs through a narrow, unmarked, neck-like channel. Easy to do with a chartplotter, but very difficult with DR navigation.

    Heading northbound. Winds were howling today, gusts to 30 mph. Hopeful that the bridge would open. Great bridgetender. Went to the anchorage in Little Alligator River…nasty, crossed the river to the East & South Lakes. Followed our GPS to the middle of the South Lake. Five boats anchored here tonight in very calm water despite the 15 MPH winds. Will definitely keep this anchorage in mind the next time we are in the area. Our 5’5″ draft had no problem getting in here! (3/29/12)
    Just noticed the statement for sufficient room for 38 foot vessels, every boat in here tonight is over 40 feet. Can’t believe the room back here. So much room, a beautiful anchorage.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Anchorage Directory Listing For East and South Lake Anchorages

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of East and South Lake Anchorages

  • Praise for Deep Point Marina, Cape Fear River, AICW Statute Mile 307

    910-269-2380 The new 82-slip Deep Point Marina is located on the Cape Fear River in Southport, NC, and offers fuel and transient dockage, as well as daily, monthly and annual slip rentals. The marina is adjacent to the new Bald Head Island Ferry Terminal, which houses a snack bar (open seasonally) that offers grab-and-go food options, soft drinks, beer, wine and coffee. In addition, the Deep Point Marina is convenient to Southport's shopping, restaurants and historic district, and offers easy ocean access.

    Deep Point Marina lies in the Cape Fear River via a marked entry channel northwest of Cape Fear River/AICW marker #20 and is a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    Deep Point Marina was the best place we’ve found. The people are GREAT and helpful, place was CLEAN, and the overnight rate was the best we found. we will stop back to see them.
    Faith Olsen

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Deep Point Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Deep Point Marina

  • Report on Jordan Creek Anchorage, AICW Statute Mile 140

    Jordan Creek lies well to the west-northwest of the Waterway’s flashing daybeacon #4, along Pungo River’s westerly banks. This stream plays host to the River Rat Yacht Club, one of the most fun loving organizations of its type to be found anywhere.
    Cruisers sometimes anchor on the waters of Jordan Creek, and we do list this haven in our “North Carolina Anchorage Directory.” However, while we have always found 4 1/2 foot depths if this stream is carefully approached, the thin water reported below by Captain Beard is for real!

    I have gone in here and anchored off the club. Entrance is marked but shallow, less than 4ft.
    Earl Beard

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Anchorage Directory Listing For Jordan Creek

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Jordan Creek

  • Shoaling Reported on Approach Channel from Beaufort Inlet to Beaufort, NC Waterfront

    This shoaling seems to lie at the southern end of Radio Island between marker #22 and marker #2 at the south end of the main channel leading from Beaufort Inlet into the Beaufort waterfront. Fortunately, most of us will be able to cruise through 9-foot MLW depths without a problem, but this report does signal that these waters will have to be carefully watched for future shallowing!

    NC – BEAUFORT HARBOR – SHOALING
    Shoaling to a depth of 9.0ft MLW has been reported in the vicinity of Beaufort Harbor Channel Warning Daybeacon A (LLNR 34811). Chart 11545

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Daybeacon A

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For the Beaufort Municipal Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Beaufort, NC Waterfront

  • Differing Opinions on New Bern Grand Marina off the Neuse River in New Bern, NC

    The New Bern Grand Marina lies along Trent River’s northern banks between the low-level Trent River highway and railroad bridges. It seems pretty clear both from our own experience at this facility as well as the wealth of contrary views below, that the predominant opinion is, and should be, that New Bern Grand Marina is a fine facility

    The marina and hotel are now two seperate amenities. NO SECURITY at night. The grounds are littered and it looks like a third rate glorified lawn mowing company has tried to landscape..the day I visited they blew their lawn clippings and leaves in the water for your boat pumps to get stopped up. This marina is not what it was when I visited two years ago..we are very disappointed and will not be staying there.
    Mike Thompson

    These comments are contrary to everything I have experienced at the New Bern Grand Marina. The marina is neat and clean. The staff is great, always going the extra mile to insure those of us who actually have boats there are happy and comfortable.
    Jim Powell

    The negative comments above are from a man having a bad day for some reason. We keep a boat at New Bern Grand and we couldn’t be more pleased. The staff is helpful and courteous, the docks and grounds in top shape, the atmosphere and neighbors friendly and pleasant. We get a weekly email of news, status, reminders, and are kept informed of all events.
    New Bern Grand is in the middle of downtown New Bern and is convenient to everything. The unhappy boater is right in one thing, there are now two separate business entities. It’s been transparent to the slip holders thus far.
    One other thing, though New Bern experienced a 9-foot water surge with Hurricane Irene and it’s streets were under 2 feet of water, the marina and residents suffered no real damage.
    Ben

    We stay at this marina every spring on our way north, usually for a month, and are headed there in two weeks. Called a good friend who is a longtime liveaboard there, and he confirmed that the marina has changed hands, but says he hasn’t noticed much change. We look forward to going back.
    Dennis Jay

    The negative comments above are from a man having a bad day for some reason. We keep a boat at New Bern Grand and we couldn’t be more pleased. The staff is helpful and courteous, the docks and grounds in top shape, the atmosphere and neighbors friendly and pleasant. We get a weekly email of news, status, reminders, and are kept informed of all events.
    New Bern Grand is in the middle of downtown New Bern and is convenient to everything. The unhappy boater is right in one thing, there are now two separate business entities. It’s been transparent to the slip holders thus far.
    One other thing, though New Bern experienced a 9-foot water surge with Hurricane Irene and it’s streets were under 2 feet of water, the marina and residents suffered no real damage.
    Ben

    We stay at this marina every spring on our way north, usually for a month, and are headed there in two weeks. Called a good friend who is a longtime liveaboard there, and he confirmed that the marina has changed hands, but says he hasn’t noticed much change. We look forward to going back.
    Dennis Jay

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For New Bern Grand Marina

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of New Bern Grand Marina

  • A Tall Ship Will Make Washington, NC Waterfront Docks Its New Homeport


    Washington, NC is a long-time and much valued SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, March 14, 2012, WASHINGTON, NC
    The Schooner Jeanie B, a 72′ tall masted sailing vessel, will be coming to the City of Washington and become a fixture to the community of Eastern North Carolina.

    The Washington Harbor District Alliance helped to formulate the new partnership between the City of Washington and The Schooner Jeanie B. This partnership creates a relationship that couples the vibrant waterfront in Washington, NC with the educational and family sailings of the vessel. Schooner Jeanie B will reconnect the rich history of Washington’s past which was active with tall ships with the present when she arrives March 21.
    The Schooner Jeanie B is a traditional sailing vessel that sails with Camps Sea Gull and Seafarer during the summer months and Boy Scouts of America and the Pamlico Sea Base during the spring and fall months. Jeanie B teaches principles of sailing, ship handling, and traditional navigation including using the stars to find their way. Team and character building are another benefit the campers, scouts and students experience living aboard the boat
    as they travel around the Inner Banks of North Carolina visiting various ports such as Manteo, Ocracoke, Washington and Beaufort.
    The Jeanie B also provides sailing excursions during the week and weekends from the docks in Washington, NC. She can take up to 25 passengers for afternoon and evening sunset or star gazing sails. The captain and crew of Jeanie B can put you at the helm of the 72′ vessel, allow you and your friends to raise her sails and navigate along the Pamlico River or just sit back and enjoy the peaceful sail of an afternoon or evening.
    To celebrate the arrival of Schooner Jeanie B, the City of Washington, NC welcomes her March 21 – 24 with an array of activities. Jeanie B will arrive in Washington on the afternoon of Wednesday, March 21 and that evening a lecture entitled, “Equinox, Solstice, Hallmark and Hershey. A talk on astronomical events and how they merge with our lives” will be given by Dr. Lee Sutton, owner and operator of the schooner. Jeanie B teaches celestial navigation and her arrival, to coincide with the Vernal Equinox on March 21, couples that teaching to her new home. The lecture will take place at the North Carolina Estuarium along the Washington waterfront.
    Thursday and Friday, March 22, 23, the vessel will be offering free tours from 10am until 2pm. Saturday, March 24, Jeanie will be offering free to all the public multiple sailings from the docks of the City of Washington.
    After this arrival celebration, the schooner will make Washington, NC her permanent home and be available for corporate, family or group sailings throughout the year. For additional information, please contact the Jeanie B at 804-519-0174 and schoonerjeanieb@gmail.com
    For more information Contact Lee Sutton at 804-519-0174 or Beth Byrd, Director Washington Harbor District Alliance at 252-947-1487, whda@washingtononthewater.com
    Beth Byrd
    Director
    Washington Harbor District Alliance
    102 East 2nd Street
    PO Box 1988
    Washington, NC 27889
    Cell: 252-947-1487
    Email: whda@washingtononthewater.com
    Web: www.whda.org
    Much appreciation goes out to our Corporate Sponsors and the City of Washington for their support:

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For the Washington City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Washington City Docks

  • Anchored on Taylor Creek (Beaufort, NC – near St. M. 201)

    An interesting series of events described below, but the real lesson here is how much current exists on the very popular Taylor Creek anchorage, just off the Beaufort, NC waterfront, and how carefully one must anchor, and maintain those anchors.

    We remember Taylor Creek readily, mostly because of the currents. Anchored at the eastish end, in a fairly narrow section, we seemed to either be too close for comfort to the island or too the channel. Nothing we did could change this. Our neighbor though, never seemed to move more than a couple feet. So one day, I rowed over to see how they were anchored, anxious to learn a better way.
    Turned out the woman was by herself, her husband having been taken to the hospital several days before because of a heart attack. She was besides herself because of a storm that was forecast for that evening and her rodes had wrapped around themselves so much that her scope had significantly been reduced, and she was pretty certain that one, if not both anchors had tripped (originally anchored Bahamian style). In addition, their engine was overheating and she wasn’t comfortable operating it to begin with.
    I offered to help do what I could and she enthusiastically agreed. I went back and got Jill, so the three of us could sort out her predicament. Pulled her anchors up and discovered that she was right in her assessment, although only one anchor had tripped, the wrapping having pulled it halfway up the other anchor’s rode. Got her reanchored (her engine was overheating) and Jill and I went back to our boat, happy that we did a good deed. We still chuckle when we rethink of this event, thinking that boat was so well anchored and that we could learn something from her, when it turned out it was borderline, at best.
    As it turned out her boat started swinging just as far and wide as ours did, so we learned nothing there; but, it didn’t drag throughout the storm. Her husband returned two days latter and the impression we got was that he wasn’t very pleased that we helped his wife… never said hello, even thought he motored right by us repeatedly, never said thanks. We still can’t understand that part, but none-the-less, we’d do it again if the opportunity presented itself!
    Rudy
    Briney Bug

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Anchorage Directory Listing For the Taylor Creek Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Taylor Creek Anchorage

  • New Grocery/Deli Open on Beaufort, NC’s Front Street, Within Easy Walking Distance of the Municipal Docks (St. M. 201)

    During a recent research visit to the northeastern and central NC coastline, we were delighted to be taken on a tour of a new, downtown Beaufort grocery store and deli, soon to be opened as Taylor’s Creek Grocery (525 Front Street, 252-838-1495). We saw shelves being stocked with what looked to be delectable yummies, and extensive coolers about to be loaded with all sorts of cold drinks, including beer and wine. Equally impressive was the large deli corner, where everything was shiny new, and looked to be just waiting to churn out a mouth watering selection of sandwiches.
    And, what’s best about this new facility from a cruiser’s point of view, is its location, within easy walking distance of the Beaufort Municipal docks. In fact, the store’s position at the corner of Front and Queen Streets, places it just across the road from the eastern tip of the city docks.
    We were told Taylor’s Creek Grocery would be open for business by mid-March, 2012, and, indeed, all the activity we saw would tend to suggest that this opening date is on target. So, now, in addition to Community Market (a couple of blocks from the city docks on Broad Street), and taking a courtesy car to the local Food Lion and Piggly Wiggly supermarkets, cruisers who berth at the Beaufort Municipal Docks have a very attractive provisioning possibility within easy walking distance!

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For the Beaufort Municipal Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of the Beaufort, NC Waterfront

  • Replacement of the Grayden Paul Bridge Proposed, Beaufort, NC, near AICW Statute Mile 201

    The Gallants Channel – Grayden Paul Bridge (US 70 in Beaufort, NC) is off the Waterway and this proposed construction would affect those southbound cruisers making use of the Gallants Channel to visit the Beaufort waterfront. The period of construction and its completion is not indicated in the proposal.

    NC – AIWW (NEUSE RIVER TO MYRTLE GROVE SOUND) MOREHEAD CITY HARBOR CHANNEL – BEAUFORT INLET – BEAUFORT
    (GALLANTS) CHANNEL – PUBLIC NOTICE
    All interested parties are notified that an application from the North Carolina Department of Transportation has been received by the Commander, Fifth Coast Guard District for approval of a proposed replacement of the US 70/Graydon Paul Bridge, at mile 0.1, over Gallants (Beaufort) Channel, in Beaufort, between Radio Island and Michael J Field, Carteret County, NC. The project involves a new high-level fixed bridge on a new alignment and improving US 70 to a multi-lane facility. The proposed vertical clearance will be 65 feet, above mean high water; with a horizontal clearance of 100 feet between pile bents. Comments will be received for the record at the office of Commander (dpb), Fifth Coast Guard District, 431 Crawford Street, Portsmouth, VA 23704-5004. Comments on this proposal should be forwarded to the above address attention (dpb) no later than April 5, 2012. A copy of Public Notice 5-1256, which describes the proposal in detail, can be obtained by calling (757) 271-1016 or by viewing at http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=pnBridges. Chart: 11541

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Gallants Channel

  • An Argument For Dredging North Carolina’s Oregon Inlet

    The dredging or lack thereof of Oregon Inlet has been a hot button topic along the North Carolina coastline since the 1970’s. And, discussions centering around this issue along the Outer Banks can get VERY heated.
    Oregon Inlet and its shallow water problems were the subject of a 1980’s novel, titled “The Hatterask Incident.” GOOD reading to this day!
    Oregon Inlet lies just south of Nags Head, NC, and cuts west into Old House Channel and the Roanoke Sound channel. The commercial fishing fleet on Roanoke Island at Wanchese, NC, depends upon this seaward path for access to their offshore fisheries. On the other hand, there are those (and we are NOT among this group), who would argue that the massive dredging of this inlet, as argued for by Dr. Meredith below, would be an environmental disaster.
    This is a controversy that NEVER seems to die!

    Hatteras and Oregon Inlets Shoaling:
    Bring in a Giant Dutch Hopper Dredge and do it Right!
    The time is now to contract a vessel like the Dutch built Trailing Suction Hopper Dredge Congo River. The entire Oregon Inlet could be cleaned out in a matter of weeks through the use of a 40,000 cubic meter capacity vessel as pictured in Congo River Trailing Suction Hopper Dredge website.
    A commercial trailing suction hopper dredge could discharge its dredge spoils close to the beach. In the case of Oregon Inlet dredging deposit the spoils, as close as possible, say at North Nags Head. And then let Mother Nature do the rest. The prevailing tides would carry the new sediment southward and inshore. A supplement to the South Nags Head beach restoration project. An added bonus would be a dramatic increase in zooplankton and fish populations on the newly constructed outer bar. Making South Nags Head a top surf fishing destination on the Outer Banks. Ditto for outer bar vis a vis world class surfing.
    The US Army Corps of Engineers and their little side discharge Dredge Merritt was but a joke. Another waste of your hard earned federal tax dollars. Just another federal jobs program. Ditto for the hopper dredge Currituck with its tiny 300 cubic meter payload. You see how long that lasted, don’t you? In the long run, the Currituck proved to be five times as expensive as a real hopper dredge like the Congo River.
    The Congo River with its 40,000 cubic meter payload, could completely clean out Oregon Inlet in a few weeks! And would not have to return for years, perhaps decades. Much less expensive than those never ending, make work federal dredge projects. And less expensive than building a long, terribly expensive, quickly foiled, granite rip rap North Jetty.
    Wake up North Carolina! The Federal Government is the problem, not the solution. If necessary, finance a Congo River dredging project yourselves. Contract a large commercial trailing suction hopper dredge and the shoaling of Oregon Inlet problem could be resolved in a few weeks. The Congo River Hopper Dredge would be so effective that no granite rip rap north jetty would be needed. Saving hundreds of millions of dollars. And Congo River type massive dredging project would not have to be repeated for years, perhaps decades.
    Citizens of the mid Atlantic, petition Congressman Walter Jones and your other elected representatives to, in turn, petition the central government to waive their restriction that requires only US built Hopper Dredges to do projects like this. The corrupt US Corps of Engineers has repeatedly tried with their tiny, breakdown prone dredges to open these two vital inlets. And look at all the money that has been wasted!
    If the Bush-Clinton cabal can scam America in order to allow their coconspirators in Indonesia, China and Taiwan, to import hundreds of billions of dollars worth of junk products into America….if Congress allowed this fraud upon America, surely we can spend a few million dollars to employ our Dutch allies, to come in and really clean out Oregon Inlet and Hatteras Inlet.
    Wake up Citizens of the Mid Atlantic! Ask the federal Government for a waiver and bring in a massive hopper dredge like the Dutch Based Congo River. To really open up these inlets!
    George Meredith MD
    Virginia Beach

    Dear Captain Claiborne S Young,
    It was only because I have been fighting with the Virginia Beach dredging bureaucrats that I even came to know about the requirement that only US Built hopper dredges can be used for US dredging! What a farce!
    Think about that. We have foreign made super tankers, colliers and container carriers plying US waters every day. To the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars each year. Now, why in the hell would we keep want to big Dutch hopper dredges out…especially when they can do a much better job for much, much less.
    Go forth and shout this from the hilltops. You have a bully pulpit!
    Search George Meredith MD dredging pipeline marsh restoration etc for more details
    Thanks,
    GM

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Oregon Inlet

  • McCotters Marina Update (Feb. 2012) – off the AICW on Pamlico River, near Washington, NC

    McCotters Marina, Washington, NCThe year of 2011 was a real challenge for one of our favorite marinas along the central North Carolina coastline. In January (2011), a disastrous boat fire swept through part of McCotters Marina, destroying any number of vessels. Many of you subsequently participated in the Cruisers’ Recovery Fund sponsored jointly by the Salty Southeast Cruisers’ Net and Waterway Guide, to help bring relief to those whose boats were lost or heavily damaged. And, that fund raising effort was a RESOUNDING SUCCESS!
    Then, as mentioned below, in August, Hurricane Irene rained more destruction on this facility! Two of the remaining covered slips/boathouses were destroyed.
    Well, things have really looked up since then for this SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS’ NET SPONSOR!!! Check out all the many improvements and recovery efforts described below, and then, PLEASE, whenever possible, patronize this facility. Captain Mark Henley, marina owner, and his fine staff will make you feel more than welcome!

    McCotters Marina Update
    February 2012
    McCotters Marina is better than ever! Even though 2011 presented some challenges for this North Carolina landmark our full service marina and boat yard is bouncing back stronger than ever.
    As many of you may know a boat fire in January spread to the docks, destroying the North Boat House that had stood watch over Broad Creek for over a half century. Then hurricane “Irene” stormed through in August claiming the two remaining boat houses. These two events brought an end the “boat house era” at McCotters.
    Through it all the McCotters Crew has continued to serve the boating community providing dockage, on-land storage, boat repair, maintenance, custom canvas and sails, sail repair, rigging, boat brokerage and a ships store.
    Going forward McCotters will be in the unique position of offering the regions most experienced repair and maintenance crew combined with new docks. We are excited to report that three of the four docks are already open and construction of the fourth dock is well under way with completion within weeks.
    The McCotters crew wishes to thank its many loyal customers for their continued support over the last year and invites boating friends old and new to come be a part of the rebirth going on at McCotters.
    New slips available on a first come first served basis. Come see us!
    Mark Henley

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For McCotters Marina

    Click on Chartlet Below to Open a Chart View Window,
    Centered on the Location of This Marina:

  • Praise for The Boatyard at Hampstead, Top Sail Beach, NC, AICW Statute Mile 264.5

    The Boatyard at Hampstead, NC, lies on the west side of the Waterway at Marker #90, 1 mile north of Harbour Village Marina and 1 mile south of the Top Sail Beach swing bridge, adjacent to Anchors Away Boatyard. Their phone is 910-270-2194

    We used The Boatyard at Hampstead during a recent boat sale while working as the yacht broker, and found this yard to offer excellent service, very pleasant to work with, and very conscientious.
    The owners, Pamela and Gerald Foy, took over the yard a year ago, April 2011. This full service yard is just off the ICW north of Wrightsville Beach, very convenient to those cruising the ICW. They are listed on Active Captain as a “1st choice”.
    Calvin Cornish and Wendy Young, MTOA #2641
    “Blue Crab” 32′ Island Gypsy, Punta Gorda FL

    The Boatyard at Hampstead’s web address: www.theboatyardathampstead.com

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of The Boatyard at Hampstead

  • Word of Caution re Anchoring in Elizabeth City, NC, Dismal Swamp Route, Statute Mile 50

    While most cruisers opt to either tie up at the free Mariners Wharf City Docks or anchor south of the HWY 158 bridge, Mark is correct that the little cove north of the bridge at mile 50 does appear to be a good anchorage, but is not. However, south of the bridge puts you much closer to the downtown area. Also, note that the facility described as “a marina on the south shore” below, is really the private Elizabeth City Yacht Club.Either way.
    However you visit, don’t forget Elizabeth City is a SALTY SOUTHEAST CRUISERS NET SPONSOR!

    CAUTION when anchoring near 50 mile mark! Right at the 50 mile mark, there is a Marina on the South shore. It’s close to the highway, and it gives the appearance of a nice place to anchor … figuring nice folks are nearby, (with about 30 boats docked at the marina), and nothing else. And it appears that if necessary, one can dingy up and get to shore if needed. HOWEVER … look close at the charts! There are very ugly serious underwater hazards out from the pier, both to the East and West of that 50 mile line on chart. Looking out away from the pier to the NNW and North East, these nasty hazards are visible when the wind blows hard from the North for a few days. There is a particular nasty sunken barge NNW of the pier!! A Tow Boat had a very hard time pulling a 40’ cruiser off a sunken barge last year. The story is this area was used as a graveyard for numerous wood barges back in the day.

    This area is a good place to anchor, as long as you stay very far from shore, and are East of the 50 mile line. If you see evidence of a sunken barge up near the shore, there is likely another big one 200 to 300 feet closer to you that you cannot see. If you stay directly North of this pier/marina/yacht club, you’ll be fine. The club boaters know of these hazards, and will watch out for you when coming and going. There’s plenty of room for a boat to anchor and local boats to work around you. On a direct line from this pier, I’m guessing one has clearance from obstructions to no more than 100 feet to the West, and at maybe 300 feet to the East. That pier is the Pasquotank River Yacht Club. We hope to mark these hazardous soon. We’ve been unsuccessful with getting any government agency to take it on, so we may try to do it ourselves. We usually have no slips available, but don’t hesitate to holler and say hi! However in an emergency, don’t hesitate to beach it between pier and our club house which you can see just SW of pier. Some members have beached there to clean the bottom. If you see anyone hanging around the pier, and want to dingy over for fresh water, that shouldn’t be a problem; hopefully you can talk someone into handing you a hose to let you fill up. We know it’s a bit awkward getting water downtown.
    Mark H.

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Mariners Wharf [Elizabeth] City Docks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Elizabeth City, NC

  • Report from Lockwoods Folly/ AICW Intersection, Statute Mile 321

    Lockwoods Folly Inlet (NOT the AICW) was closed to navigation in October of 2011 and as reported below, dredging is underway. We will update the condition of the inlet as we get word, but for now, even though the depths at the intersection of the Waterway and inlet are good, you should still avoid the inlet passage!

    1-20-12
    Lots of dredging going on as we go through this area. we have no problems and we showed 16 feet as we passed the inlet. Just after fell to 8-10. this is low tide at 8:30 AM
    Penny and Dick
    Penelope catamaran

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s “AICW Problem Stretches” Listing For the AICW/Lockwoods Folly Inlet Intersection

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To This AICW Problem Stretch

  • Baird Creek Adventure, Upper Neuse River, off the AICW near New Bern, NC

    Baird Creek, charted as Beard Creek,liess on the north shore of the upper Neuse River north of Wilkinson Point. As Cat. Ben points out, it is marked by a single marker #1. All of us who have done any gunk-holing will enjoy this delightful tale of keel versus bottom, which will also explain why this particular creek is NOT in our North Carolina Anchorage Directory. Thanks for sharing, Capt. Ben.

    Cruising News:
    The long keel, forever hallowed be its name.
    I may not lay claim to being the dumbest boater, but I strive for the top-five.
    In North Carolina, we have three types of bottoms, pecan-sandy, chocolate-pudding mud, and occasionally rocky-road-oyster shoal. Hungry yet? We love to gunk hole. It’s almost not an adventure if I cannot jump out of the boat and pull it along with the rope or kedge the anchor. Where’s the fun in being sensible? Markers in our waters are usually inaccurate because last month’s hurricane made a shoal where the channel used to be. Soft groundings come with the territory.
    What has saved us in our limitless search for shallow waters and low-cost barnacle scrapings has been our beloved full keel. That and our craft tops out at about eight knots. With a wind. In shallow waters I have the deep sagacity to reduce speed to around 3 knots, so as not to bump anything too hard. One day, I hope to be a smarter captain, but our current mode of gunk-holing has provided hours of adventure, angst, and amusement to my first mate, and I for one refuse to deprive her of the joys of seeing mud churn off our stern. She’s become quite the expert at spotting it.
    On our last adventure, we decided to explore the deep reaches of the Northern Neuse River on Baird Creek just after Thanksgiving. It is marked by a single green “1” daymark and a smattering of private PVC pipes with colored tape jammed in the ground. If you were a golfer, you would call this one hazard-filled course. For a boater it generally tracks around 5 feet deep if you are mostly lucky and very careful. Ours is a single-screw trawler with the aforementioned full keel. Believe me, this captain needs it. Drawing a hair over 42 inches of water, I make it a point to scout out sailboat masts in any unfamiliar harbor, because it’s a good bet that that captain will need a full five feet to knock around in there. Seeing a few masts, we gingerly entered Baird Creek in the afternoon, threw out anchor and proceeded to lounge a bit. I had some minor wiring repairs to do with the generator, so went about that a little after some engine cooling.\
    Around dusk we fired up the generator, only to realize the repairs made did not fix the root problem, which was the transmission of current from the output leads to the rest of our craft. Including the Two-cycle AC (It’s November and a little chilly. After some mutual frowning and head-scratching, my first mate advises me that with the low temperature forecast, we might do better comfort-wise back at our slip, about 10 miles up the Neuse. So after some long deep breaths, inhale/exhale style – to draw in air for the work ahead of course, I agreed with my mate and decided to get about hoisting the anchor.
    Now, this is where the real adventure begins – Anchor, up, no worries. Despite scrubbing and rinsing we still brought a good amount of chocolate pudding aboard as we pulled chain in the dark. In addition, what I failed to notice upon coming into little Baird Creek, was that the wind had shifted to the North, blowing water up the Pamilco Sound and draining the Neuse a bit – lowering the water with one of the Neuse’s famous – or infamous – wind-tides. Our depth finder gets psychotic under 4 feet and we start showing about 700 feet of water whenever this happens – so 700 feet showing usually means we’re near a touch-point, and we were seeing this. We get going about a hundred yards and feel the slow, gentle shudder of bottom. OK- no good. Adrenaline and dismay. We back off a little, free ourselves, and try in a different direction. OK, not so bad, but not for long. We find bottom again. Gentle shudder. Chocolate pudding again. It’s pitch black out except for the small lights of the relatively few homes on Baird Creek. So we back off again and track slowly and surely very close to some of the homes with modest piers. This seems to work. Eventually, gingerly, and nervously we were able to exit Baird Creek with our running gear and some portion of our wits intact. But I can assure the reader any future trip there – in or out – will be in daylight and with a south wind keeping the water high in the Neuse. For Baird Creek – boater beware!
    Thanks once again to King Neptune for providence and our long keel for its patience – it’s saved us from ourselves many a time.
    Capt. Ben
    M/V Sand Castle
    Neuse River

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Beard Creek

  • Belhaven Town Dock Open for Business, Pantego Creek, AICW Statute Mile 135.5

    Construction on this municipal dock was begun this past fall and its completion is very welcome news for folks wanting to visit the charming town of Belhaven. Docking is free with a 24 hour limit and the dock also provides dinghy dockage for cruisers anchored in the nearby Pantego Creek Anchorage.

    Just thought you might like to know the Belhaven Town dock has been finished. I have attached three photos of the 1st two boats to dock. The BYC (Belhaven Yacht Club) found and assisted the town of Belhaven in getting the grant to do this project.
    Andy Fisher

    Cruising News:
    Had the opportunity to be the first boat docked at the ‘New’ Bellhaven Town dock. Spent the night of 28 December there while aboard a Pearson 424… found pleanty of water for the 6′ draft. We took soundings in the dingy before we went in, and found 8′ all the way in (stay close to the old pilings). The entry channel has good water just stay in the middle until you see the new dock (near the hospital). Stayed the night with a friend on a Southern Cross 31 and were joined by another sailboat the next day. Local paper came out and officially pronounced the dock “open” (we made the front page).
    The dock was constructed with money from a grant, and while no signs are up now, there is to be a 24hour limit. Trash disposal is available, and there is a public restroom across the parking lot. Close to the hardware store, and restaurant… great stop!
    S/V Faith

    Great News! I will make it a regular stop. And if there is any $$$ left over, how about installing a HarborCam so I can see from the waterway if there is room at the dock? Just asking.
    Roger Hitchner
    Painter, Hershine 41

    Amenities? I don’t see power hookups,etc.
    Al Ross

    There is power and water as well a pump out.
    At the very end of the main channel just before the bridge. Have to go in through a very small channel lined with rickety pilings. Looks improbable, but it is there. Wouldn’t have found it without the photos.
    Keith

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Anchorage Directory Listing For the Belhaven/Pantego Creek Anchorage

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Belhaven, NC

  • Jarrett Bay Boatworks Recommended For Dry Storage (Statute Mile 197)

    Captain Bill and Kathleen’s response below is in answer to a question which originally appeared on the AGLCA mailing list, asking for dry boat storage recommendations north of Beaufort, SC. Well, Jarrett Bay is actually located north of Beaufort, NC, on the Core Creek Canal section of the AICW.
    This is a superb facility for dry storage, and for any sort of repair work. There are many repair firms on-site, including our friends at Core Creek Marine. And, oh yes, even though Bill and Kathleen say Jarrett Bay is “not a marina,” there is some transient dockage available by the fuel dock, and both gasoline and diesel fuel can be purchased.

    I would recommend Jarrett Bay in Beaufort, NC off the ICW. You can get their contact info off the internet at They are a repair and storage yard, not a marina. They have an excellent facility and staff, very experienced at storing boats in a manner that avoids hurricane damage. We used them for repairs on our Hatteras when we were passing through on the loop two years ago. We were very satisfied. Ask for Roger Wetherington and tell him Bill Root referred you.
    Bill & Kathleen Root

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Jarrett Bay Boatworks

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Jarrett Bay Boatworks

  • A Good Stay at Whittaker Creek Yacht Harbor, Neuse River, Oriental, NC near AICW Statute Mile 181

    Whittaker Creek Yacht Harbor lies on the point separating the two major branches of Whittaker Creek, northeast of Oriental Harbor’s flashing daybeacon #1.

    Whittaker Creek Yacht Harbor just northwest of Oriental NC is one of the most relaxing stays I have experienced in 5 years of cruising. The $11.00 a day slip with electricity included (that’s right Eleven) way more than made up for the less than new docks. It’s a short bike ride to a lot of fine restaurants and coffee shops. There’s a marine consignment shop with more stuff than I’ve seen in the Defender catalog. There is a hardware store close by, a grocery store, a marine supply store and a West Marine. They’re all within walking distance but might be to far for someone not used to walking, They are all withing less than 10 minutes biking distance.
    I spent three weeks there during the end of November and beginning of December, the best part of my stay was all the great people I met. I was invited to the Orphan Sailor Thanksgiving feast and spent quality time on board other sailor’s boats enjoying adult beverages. I highly recommend visiting, the owner, Knute, will make you feel welcome. If your boat draws more than 5’5″, you have to enter when there is no wind or when the wind is from a northerly quarter, a southerly wind drops the channel depth to less than 6 ft. It’s 6 1/2 ft with no wind and more than 7 with a wind from the north. For those unfamiliar with the Carolinas, there are no lunar or solar tides and the water levels are influenced by the winds.
    Henry Zalegowski on S/V Turn’er Loose

    Click Here To View the Cruisers’ Net’s North Carolina Marina Directory Listing For Whittaker Creek Yacht Harbor

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Whittaker Creek Yacht Harbor

  • Captain Wally’s Beaufort, NC Impressions (Statute Mile 201)

    The extract below is taken from Captain Wally Moran’s “LiveBloggin’ the ICW” (http://bloggingtheicw.blogspot.com/). He gives some good info about one of our very favorite ports of call, but we must disagree with him about there not being any propane within walking distance of the Beaufort Town Docks. He should have check the Cruisers’ Net’s “NC LPG/CNG Availability” directory at http://cruisersnet.net/marinas/010-north-carolina/?lpg-cng. By doing so, he would have discovered a long walk would have taken him to Teels Gas Service at 813 Cedar Street (252-728-7039).

    Beaufort is the first major ocean access harbour on the ICW, if you don’t count Norfolk, at its head. Most of the traffic now is sportfishermen, recreational boats and the occasional freighter. It’s also the first location where you run into substantial tide and current. Those three feet (approx) of tide create a very strong current that affects how you anchor and how and where you put your rode down. Holding in the anchorage is good though, so once you’ve done a proper job of backing down, you can safely nod off.
    The waterfront is one of the nicer ones on the ICW, with a good number of decent pubs overlooking the Beaufort waterfront along its boardwalk. Opposite the waterfront is Radio Island [actually Carrot Shoal – editor] – on occasion you’ll see wild horses there, although I never have for some reason. Beaufort is also where I usually see my first dolphins on every trip south. And for real wildlife, there’s my friend Will and his lime green cat!
    Two major downtown Beaurort highlights are the Maritime Museum and the Wooden Boat Building museum, where they actually build wooden boats. The Maritime Museum has an amazing library with thousands of out of print nautical titles, and probably something for everyone. The Maritime Museum at one time used to have a loaner car for transients – that service is no longer, thanks to lawyers and lawsuits making it prohibitively expensive to do so.
    That’s unfortunate, because shopping is too far to walk – as is a propane refill, which is truly unfortunate, because the tank for my boat heater JUST RAN OUT, and it’s going to be chilly tonight. I’ll have to hook up the cooking propane. Fortunately, I’ll be in Wrightsville Beach tomorrow, and they DO have a loaner car and the propane refill store is very close.
    Wally Moran
    LiveBloggin’ the ICW
    http://bloggingtheicw.blogspot.com/

    Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Beaufort, NC Region

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